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5.0 out of 5 stars Funniest Sports Flick Ever!
"Caddyshack" combines terrific comic writing, a top-notch cast at the top of its game, and America's love affair with the silly game of golf to form comedy gold.
Using the most cliched plotlines imaginable (the "cools versus the rules," and "the little guy needs to find his way in life"), "Caddyshack" nevertheless breaks a lot of new ground with its timeless...
Published on June 29 2004 by Scott Schiefelbein

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Kenny Loggins' Finest Moment ?
I have to remember NEVER to go back and watch, as an adult, those movies I loved when I was a kid. Despite my unnaturally fond memories, I must now confess that I find CADDYSHACK to be so poorly and crassly realized that it has caused me to regret my childhood.
What good can be said of this idiotfest? It's got a cute gopher (who is hardly in the movie), a great...
Published on Oct. 10 2001 by tashcrash


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Kenny Loggins' Finest Moment ?, Oct. 10 2001
By 
tashcrash (South Shore, MA) - See all my reviews
I have to remember NEVER to go back and watch, as an adult, those movies I loved when I was a kid. Despite my unnaturally fond memories, I must now confess that I find CADDYSHACK to be so poorly and crassly realized that it has caused me to regret my childhood.
What good can be said of this idiotfest? It's got a cute gopher (who is hardly in the movie), a great Rodney Dangerfield (likewise wasted, except for his wonderous opening scene), and an almost funny Bill Murray (at least he's trying).
All else is abominable. Ted Knight, a great and undervalued comedian, is left painfully stranded (after this, "Too Close for Comfort" was a major step up). The whole, poorly acted, half baked (and unresolved) teenager subplot makes MEATBALLS seem profound by comparison. It even fails as a sex comedy. And do we really need a seduction scene with Chevy chase and massage oil? How masochistic did the producers think their audience was in 1980?
As for the the ludicrous, accompanying dvd "documentary": is it just me, or are Harold Ramis and Chevy Chase competing for the most self-satisfied, smug position in Hollywood's washed up hills? They're every bit as unwatchable as their slug of a movie.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Funniest Sports Flick Ever!, June 29 2004
By 
Scott Schiefelbein (Portland, Oregon United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Caddyshack (VHS Tape)
"Caddyshack" combines terrific comic writing, a top-notch cast at the top of its game, and America's love affair with the silly game of golf to form comedy gold.
Using the most cliched plotlines imaginable (the "cools versus the rules," and "the little guy needs to find his way in life"), "Caddyshack" nevertheless breaks a lot of new ground with its timeless characters. Chevy Chase plays golf-stuf/playboy Ty Webb, who mangles philosophy while performing dazzling golf feats on the Bushwood Country Club course -- yes, the name "Bushwood" is revealing. Chase has never been better than in this film, and it's almost sad to see how phenomenal he once was when you stand this performance next to the dreck he's put out in recent years.
The underappreciated Ted Knight plays Webb's nemesis, Judge Smails, an uptight petty aristocrat who plays essentially the same role as Dean Wermer in "Animal House." Smails is Elmer Fudd to Webb's Bugs Bunny.
Rodney Dangerfield is also in the film, playing essentially himself as an obnoxious real estate developer with zero fashion sense -- ask ten people to name the character Dangerfield plays in "Caddyshack," and you'll stump ten people. But it's likely that most of those ten will be able to quote Dangerfield's character: "Lovely boy -- now I now why tigers eat their young!" "You're a caddy, huh -- for Italians, this is skilled labor." "This is the ugliest hat I've ever seen, I bet when you buy this they give you a can of soup . . . but it looks good on you, though."
And last but not least, the immortal Bill Murray plays Carl the Groundskeeper. Carl is charged with ridding Bushwood of a gopher, a varmint who loves nothing more than vandalizing golf courses and dancing to Kenny Loggins. Murray, in a performance bordering on madness, tries various futile strategies to nab the gopher, including sniper rifles, decoys, hoses, and plastic explosives, but it's his mumbled soliloquies that are the most hilarious. Murray's imagined golf game, whacking flowers with a rake, is one of the funniest scenes in any movie, ever.
Our "hero," Danny (Michael O'Keefe), is a minor character completely overwhelmed by these other characters, but his storyline is the thread that ties all the other subplots together. He cheats on his girlfriend Maggie (Animal House alum Sarah Holcomb, inexplicably with an Irish accent) with the gratuitous slut, Judge Smails' niece Lacey Underall (Cindy Morgan), and finds himself pitted against the Judge in the climactic golf match.
Not much of a plot. The movie's greatness is in its execution. The writers (Brian Doyle-Murray and Harold Ramis) find the underlying humor in the country club lifestyle and the unique culture that surrounds golf and skewer everything in sight. Be on the lookout for comic stereotypes . . . from the spoiled rich brats to the doctor who's never in the office to the profane pastor, nobody is safe. Fortunately, "Caddyshack" knows to stay just on this side of crude (coming nearest to the line with its classic "Jaws" parody involving a Baby Ruth) -- this is a witty film, not a cruel film.
This movie is a must for every guy's film library. Just be careful -- there's always a temptation to quote "Caddyshack" out on the golf course. Be warned, only about 5 million people have done it before you, and the novelty's wearing off.
Also be warned -- "Caddyshack" sparked quite possibly the worst sequel ever, "Caddyshack 2." Do not watch that movie!
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5.0 out of 5 stars "50 Bucks Says You Slice It Into The Woods!", April 26 2004
By 
The JuRK (Our Vast, Cultural Desert) - See all my reviews
I believe CADDYSHACK will always be a sentimental favorite for anyone who saw it when it was released back in the summer of 1980. We were all still catching our breath from 1978's ANIMAL HOUSE and Hollywood was trying to make lightning strike again.
John Landis and John Belushi went on to THE BLUES BROTHERS, also released in the summer of '80, but, as loud and as entertaining as it was, BLUES never delivered the laughs like the Deltas did two years before.
Doug Kenney, the mastermind behind ANIMAL HOUSE, went on to write and produce CADDYSHACK but, according to an Esquire profile after his tragic death shortly after, he was pretty coked out by then. The studio bosses referred to it as "that coke movie down in Florida." Harold Ramis, directing his first film, admits that it like "film school" since he felt like he was learning as he went.
Despite all of this, CADDYSHACK was hilarious. I think the second half loses steam, most of Chevy Chase's scenes were flat, and the central character isn't very likable or all that funny--but Rodney Dangerfield, Bill Murray and Ted Knight more than make up for any criticisms.
I'll never forget watching it the first time in a crowded theatre. Rodney burst onto the screen with such a comedic energy that you could hear everyone perking up when he'd show up. And I didn't hear anything but laughter for five mintues after he said, "What, did somebody step on a duck?"
How many comedies have offered so many quotable lines?
(Turn the subtitles on sometime and read what Bill Murray actually says during his "Dala Lama caddy" and "Cinderella story" speeches--all improvised, from what I hear!).
re: "The 19th Hole" documentary: did they play the entire master shot of the Chevy Chase and Bill Murray scene because they DIDN'T get along or was there some other reason?
(It's pretty well documented that they disliked each other--and even got into a fistfight on SNL--before shooting CADDYSHACK).
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5.0 out of 5 stars Caddyshack-Golf at its funniest, April 17 2004
This review is from: Caddyshack (VHS Tape)
"It's in the hole." Is only one of the great-remembered lines in the comical, 1980's golf film, Caddyshack. One might think that the words themselves is not funny, but when delivered by Carl Spackler (Bill Murry) a demented greens keeper, who is living out a fantasy of making a hole in one, using the tops of well groomed flower tops as golf balls. As the flower pedals are scattered all over the ground from the blow of an imaginary golf club, (sickle) you can't help to laugh at the hysterical scene. The brilliant script, written by Brain Murray and Harold Ramis (who also directed the film) is packed full of numerous hysterical lines which are used today when we are out on the golf coarse, laughing at our incompetent golf games.
The story kicks off as a snobbish head of a ritzy golf coarse, Judge Smails (Ted Knight) tries to take advantage of an high school student, Danny Noonan (Michael O'Keefe) who is interested in law school, but needs the job as a caddy to pay his way through college. Judge Smails is put in his place as a wealthy land developer, Al Czervik (Rodney Dangerfield) come on the scene and wants to build condominiums on the exclusive golf coarse. Ted and Rodney go at each other throughout the entire film, which leaves the viewer on the floor, laughing uncontrollably. If that's not enough, Ty Webb (Chevy Chase) a quiet co-founder of the coarse gets involved and gives his on hilarious performance as the middle man, pulled in many different directions. And of coarse, the most remembered character is the lonely green's keeper, Carl Spackler (Bill Murry) who is having his own private war with a gopher that has been digging up the golf coarse.
The above summery does not do the film justice. With an all star cast and a hilarious script, a soundtrack full of 1980s rock. How can you go wrong? Golfer enthusiasts, who see this hysterical comedy, will be chanting the funny punchlines every time they have a chance to, on the golf coarse. This is why I highly recommend this film and give it 5 stars.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Chevy Chase and Bill Murray are funny, March 4 2004
This is one of the funniest comedies ever to be made. It can be crude at times but not as crude as some movies out here today. The golpher is the best thing in this movie. Without the golpher this movie would be nothing at all. In this 20th anniversary special edition of this film, we get a trailer, production notes, cast and crew biography's, and a great documentary. I think a commentary would be nice on this disk but we don't get one. Warner always does stuff like that. But, like i always say, what can you do about it. I don't know why people don't like this movie so much. I couldn't believe the bad reviews this movie got. Anyway, this is good, but just skip the sequel. It was one of the worst movies ever made. Chevy Chase and Bill Murray are very funny in this film. They are the light of the movie, so is the golpher like I said. Althou this film isn't for your kids, you'll love it and it should belong on your shelf if you like comedy's and Chevy Chase or Bill Murray. So sit back and enjoy this classic comedy.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Fore! Stars, March 3 2004
By 
Robert Morris (Dallas, Texas) - See all my reviews
(TOP 10 REVIEWER)    (HALL OF FAME)   
Directed by Harold Ramis and first released in 1980, this film has since developed a following of faithful and devoted people who never seem to tire of seeing their favorite scenes again and again and again. Everything gets off to a lively start, thanks to Kenny Loggins' singing of "I'm Alright." Most of the film is alright also. Rodney Dangerfield (as the rich and vulgar real estate developer Al Czervik) dominates every scene in which he appears as does Bill Murray (as neurotic/psychotic assistant groundskeeper Carl Spackler). In fact, they have very weak competition, with the possible exception of Ted Knight (as Judge Smails) for whom Czervik immediately becomes an infuriating nemesis. Ramis and his collaborators on the screenplay apparently could not decide on a primary plot so there really is none; rather, at least three different story lines, with the adversarial conversations between Smails and Czervik generating the most laughs. Spackler has his own adversarial relationship (with gophers) which also generates some sight gags. Meanwhile, Danny Noonan (Michael O'Keefe) cannot obtain a caddy scholarship without self-important Judge Smails' approval and assistance. And meanwhile, Ty Webb (Chevy Chase) wanders in and out of various scenes. We learn little about him and care even less. Dangerfield's Czervik really is the gravitational center of the plot; the film generally sags when he's off-camera. I am not nearly so eager to see Caddyshack again as many others obviously are but I certainly appreciate its best moments and wish there were more of them.
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3.0 out of 5 stars "Caddyshack": Endearing, Quoteable, and a Cult Classic, Feb. 19 2004
By 
Daniel R. Sanderman (Portland, OR United States) - See all my reviews
If you like golf, or know someone who does, you will probably get a kick out of "Caddyshack." Interestingly enough, what starts out as a film focused upon the lives of various caddies at an exclusive country club becomes a film about the various golfers (fleshed out by a very strong cast). Chevy Chase is, hands down, my favorite actor in the film. His slapstick humor is right on the money in "Caddyshack." I get tired of certain characters, noticeably Dangerfield and Murray, but there is enough interest in the subplots to keep the film on its feet. Many of the scenes seem to be half-improvised and yet it does not fall apart as one might expect.
The truly enjoyable effect of this movie is what will happen in the next couple of days after watching it. If you have any knack for remembering lines, you will be quoting it to yourself constantly. This film provides a ton of one-liners that are remarkably peculiar and hilarious. Just take a look at the "Quotes" section above. Included in this DVD version is a documentary that interviews all of the main characters and provides a lot of information for die-hard fans about the making of the film.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Doesn't Live Up to the Hype, Feb. 9 2004
By 
Christopher D. Heer (Gurnee, IL USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Maybe my problem was high expectations.
I kept hearing that this was a classic comedy, up there with Animal House and Stripes and whatnot. I somehow had never managed to see this movie, so I figured it was about time.
I was sorely disappointed. While it certainly had some funny moments, there simply weren't enough of them. One can perhaps forgive Harold Ramis since it's his first picture, but you'd never know this was the genius who would later deliver Groundhog Day and Analyze This.
Chevy Chase's character is odd and cool, and certainly a cut above the stupid slapstick roles he'd get later, but ultimately not interesting enough to hold the picture. Rodney Dangerfield plays, well, himself, but if you really want to see him do his fish-out-of-water thing, he's better in Back to School. Ted Knight chews the scenery so badly it will make you wince with pain.
As for the actual storyline...well, there's no *there* there. It follows the old porn standby of using just enough of a plot to tie the beginning to the end, in the hopes that the comedy will be enough. In some movies, it is, but not this one. Too much of the humor is puerile and doesn't elicit more than a chuckle or two. Slapstick can be hilarious, but it isn't here. The Baby Ruth scene -- revered by so many -- mystifies me. Is there some hidden second joke that I don't see, or is all the fuss really about a candy bar in a pool that looks like, well, doody? Har har har. Very clever.
On the plus site, Bill Murray is great as a weird, brain-damaged assistant groundskeeper.
Overall, not worth the time.
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5.0 out of 5 stars So I got that goin' for me, which is nice., Jan. 25 2004
By 
"samroot" (Fulton, MO United States) - See all my reviews
Caddyshack, Starring: Chevy Chase, Rodney Dangerfield, Bill Murray and Ted Knight, and directed by Harold Ramis, is an old favorite mine from a long time ago, in a different life (military service). It has a special place because it was the best movie available for many months, so we watched it many times, and not just for the T and A! Caddyshack is a romantic comedy but there is allot more comedy than romance. A teenager, Danny Noonan, needs to win the caddy tournament to be able to afford college. He works as a caddy at Bushwood, a "snobatorium" according to perspective member Al Czervik (Rodney Dangerfield), a self made millionaire real-estate baron, who is loud, full of wisecracks and doesn't always follow the rules. Bushwood has all the stereotypical rich: Judge Smales (Ted Knight), who runs Bushwood, Dr. Beeper (Dan Risen), and the bishop. The struggles between Judge Smales and Czervik are the real plot of the movie which climaxes with a golf match for money.
Danny caddies for Ty Webb (Chevy Chase), a very wacky, rich, bachelor, and learns a few valuable lessons about golf, like "There's a force in the universe that makes things happen. And all you have to do is get in touch with it, stop thinking, let things happen, and be the ball." Golf at Bushwood is not getting any better because a gopher has tunneled in from Czervik's construction site across from the club. The assistant groundskeeper Carl Sparkler's (Bill Murray) job to get rid of the gopher and throughout the movie his attempts are thwarted due to the gopher's superior intellect.
This movie is loaded with scenes that are sitcoms in themselves, such as the scene where Ty plays through Carl's "pad" (one of the storage sheds on the course), has a few hits on some home brew and weed (rumor is the entire scene is adlib). The swimming pool scene is a classic ("Everyone out of the pool!"), as well as the final drudge match at the end. I believe this to be one of the best comedies of the '80s and watch it when I feel a need for Rodney's brand of sarcasm. Cranking the tunes, watching TV, tapping a keg, sounds like a party, right? Rodney brings them all to the fairways of Bushwood! Will Danny win the Caddy tournament? Will Ty and Czervik get Judge Smales money? Watch this classic comedy and find out.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Ultimate in Low-Brow Humor..., Nov. 25 2003
By 
Some movies aim at mankind's nobler ambitions, appealing to the intellect and refreshing the soul; others go straight for man's baser instincts. Caddyshack definitely falls in the latter catergory. With a thin plot, a shoestring budget and scenes that seem like they were almost completely improvised, one would think that Caddyshack would be a disaster. But, suprisingly enough, the movie takes these ingredients that usually signal a potential bomb and make it one of the funniest and most quotable movies of all time. This is largely due to the inspired casting choices: Chevy Chase as a Golf Stud-...-amateur Buddhist philosopher Ty Webb, Rodney Dangerfield as a loudmouthed Real Estate salesman and Bill Murray as Karl the hapless groundskeeper. These actors make the juvenile humor that usually makes me yawn with indifference into great slapstick and inspired goofiness. If this movie hadn't been made, Sports Center would be without hundreds of its best quips, scores of College Students would have nothing to say to each other while ignoring professors etc. Sure its toilet humor, but it shines magnificently in my opinion because it withstands the strain of multiple viewings without diminishing its quirky and often stupid humor.
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Caddyshack: 20th Anniversary Edition (Sous-titres français)
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