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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Classic That Worms Its Way Into Your Dreams
"Night of the Living Dead" is a classic that worms its way into your dreams. Truly amazing stuff. Back when Romero and Russo wrote and films this, they did not yet realize they were created a whole new subgenre of horror. Much as I like the remake, the undead are creepiest in the shadows of black and white film.
I'm writing to respond to one reviewer's...
Published on July 12 2004 by Travis Langley

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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars This is the re-edited version!
The MOVIE is 5 stars.
This DVD is 1 star.
This is the re-edited version of the original classic. If you want the original classic them go elsewhere. If you want to see a new "version" - not a remastered version! - but a new "version" with new soundtrack, editing and scenes then this may be for you. If you want the original classic then go...
Published on Jan. 19 2004 by OverTheMoon


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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars This is the re-edited version!, Jan. 19 2004
By 
OverTheMoon (overthemoonreview@hotmail.com) - See all my reviews
The MOVIE is 5 stars.
This DVD is 1 star.
This is the re-edited version of the original classic. If you want the original classic them go elsewhere. If you want to see a new "version" - not a remastered version! - but a new "version" with new soundtrack, editing and scenes then this may be for you. If you want the original classic then go elsewhere to look for it!
You have be warned.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Classic That Worms Its Way Into Your Dreams, July 12 2004
By 
Travis Langley (Arkadelphia, AR United States) - See all my reviews
"Night of the Living Dead" is a classic that worms its way into your dreams. Truly amazing stuff. Back when Romero and Russo wrote and films this, they did not yet realize they were created a whole new subgenre of horror. Much as I like the remake, the undead are creepiest in the shadows of black and white film.
I'm writing to respond to one reviewer's nitpick and another reviewer's well-intentioned mistake. Complaining that most of it is in mono is like complaining that it's in black and white. That's how the original was made, plain and simple. Another reviewer complained about how horrible the version with added footage is. That individual is right about that version, but that's the 30th Anniversary Edition and NOT the Millenium Edition. The 30th Anniversary Edition with added scenes and weird, distracting music is too horrible for words, and not even in a "Plan 9 From Outer Space" so-bad-it's-funny way. The Millenium Edition is simply an official DVD made from a cleaned up print, with extras like the interviews. If you want to see the real "Night of the Living Dead" and get some cool extras for your money, this is the way to go.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Living and dead, Feb. 22 2007
By 
E. A Solinas "ea_solinas" (MD USA) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME)    (TOP 10 REVIEWER)   
As with any other horror genre, the groundbreaking zombie movie is the best. "Night of the Living Dead" is a cult gem that has inspired every zombie movie after it, with its low-budget look and cast of excellent, unknown actors. And, of course, the flesh-eating undead who are rising to kill the living.

A crashed satellite starts emitting radiation, which somehow causes the dead to rise out of their graves to devour the living. Don't ask how, because it doesn't matter. Barbara (Judith O'Dea) is visiting a grave with her brother -- when suddenly a shambling, dead-faced man murders him, and chases her down the road to a farmhouse, where she manages to hide.

But she's not alone -- a kindly man named Ben (Duane Jones), a young couple, and a family are also hiding there. And without weapons or protection, they have very little chance of survival. The refugees barricade themselves for protection -- but now there are hundreds of zombies closing in. They must fight with fire and their wits... but it may not be enough to save them all.

"Night of the Living Dead" is one of those horror movies that chills viewers right down to the marrow. Romero creates a nightmarish, claustrophobic atmosphere in his movie, where no matter where you go, you're trapped -- and the humans might kill you if the zombies don't. The finale is a tragic, but very realistic twist.

Originally filmed in murky black-and-white, Romero manages to make this film feel creepy even when the zombies aren't there. And while they're hiding in the farmhoruse, he takes the time to make it realistic -- the refugees grate on each other in a believable way ("I ought to drag you out there and FEED you to those things!").

But then things get creepy, gross AND action-packed, when they slip out to fight the zombies. Romero switches the tone from eerie to downright terrifying -- the characters just reek of desperation -- and builds it up to a slam-bang finale. And along the way, we get terrified people fending zombies off with torches -- what could be better?

Duane Jones is the standout performance here: he's strong, kindly, take-charge and resourceful, but he also knows how to kick undead butt. By the finale, his character is the one that is remembered. But he was backed by excellent actors in Judith O'Dea, Karl Hardman, and dozens of zombie extras. Those people were amazing!

Stripped-down and stark, "Night of the Living Dead" is the sort of movie that should never be watched at night, and might make you look twice before going outside. Creepy, innovative and bizarre.
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4.0 out of 5 stars DEFINITELY WORTH OWNING !, July 6 2006
By 
The Critic "Movie Maniac" (Windsor, Ontario) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
As a long time George A. Romero fan I didn't know what to expect when I purchased this DVD. A newly colorized version of "Night of the Living Dead" with 5.1 surround sound and a completely restored black & white version of this 1968 cult classic for one low price. I have never been in favor of colorizing black & white films but after seeing the colorized version I have a new appreciation for this film. If you're a George A. Romero fan what more could you possibly want two incredible versions on one disc at an affordable price. If you don't feel like spending the big bucks for the millennium edition, then this DVD edition is the way to go. The remastered picture and sound are excellent, better than any of the inferior copies out there and definitely better than anything I've ever seen. It's a great effort put out by 20th Century Fox Studio and Legend Films and I'm happy to finally own it.

DVD Features Include:
*All-new color version and restored black-and-white version
*Audio commentary by Mike Nelson of TV's Mystery Science Theater 3000
"Separated at Death" celebrity zombie game
*Vintage horror trailers
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5.0 out of 5 stars Get it this B & W version, Oct. 28 2004
My favorite horror film of all time is NOTLD and when I heard of the new colorized version I was naturally curious. The colorized film looks ok, but not all together too natural looking. I found that the colors worked best on inanimate objects such as trees etc, and in outdoor settings. The flesh tones are acceptable but none the less a good effort. Bottom line is that you can almost pass this off in some places as a color film but only for seconds at a time as frequently something will catch your eye that will shatter the illusion. A bright red shirt for example or an off grouping of strange, clashing colors almost make this too surreal in parts. The fire however colored really nice. I think that it would have benefited also if the contrast was toned down slightly as I think the film looks too colorful at times. Instead of blending, the colors clash too strongly sometimes. The colorized version was taken from a restored version of the film thus the quality and sharpness looks quite good and there are 5.1 and DTS audio tracks available. The special features include a restored black and white version of the movie, not as good as the Millennium Edition DVD transfer which is THX approved but this is very good and the next best edition available at the moment for such a cheap price. The B&W edition only offers the original mono track though but no chapter stops. Also included is a game where you have to guess what celebrity looks like one of the zombies from the film. A pretty useless extra that you will only ever look at once. The commentary track by Mike Nelson is pretty useless too in my opinion. It offers very little info besides the names of the actors, all the while Nelson throws out little comments that are an attempt at humor, mostly putting down the film. There are a few funny comments but most of them aren't. This is comparable to sitting around with a bunch of friends making fun of a movie where everyone just throws in their own comment mocking something. But since this is one of the best horror films ever made, there is little to mock. Overall, I enjoyed at least checking out the results of the color experiment, but the B&W original version is where it's at. The price can't be beat and I would definately recommend that you pick it up for the restored B&W version primarily and treat the colorized version as if it were an extra. I don't think you can be disappointed in this if you don't own any other version of NOTLD. Get this for the original B & W restored version of the film. You will not find such a good transfer at such a good price. The film by itself gets the full 5 stars, so I have no problem giving this release 5. The audio on the B & W could have been better but the original mono is acceptable. If this dvd had only include the colorized version I would have only given this 2 stars, because for one, this movie should not be cheapened by offering a colorized version only, (major points for including both) and the color 'experiment' wasn't entirely successful to stand on its own as something extra special.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A Good Way To End Up Dead, May 30 2004
By 
T. Lobascio (New Jersey United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
George A Romero's zombie horror classic, Night Of The Living Dead, is a watershed film for the genre. It has spawned a few sequels, a remake, countless imitations, parodies, and influenced generations of filmmakers. Of the countless DVD versions of the film that are out there, the Millennium Edition seemed to me, the best best.
Shot in black and white, on a shoestring budget, during the post Kennedy era of the late 60's, the film that had trouble finding a distributor tells a simple story, that still holds up. Seven people secluded in a Pennsylvania farmhouse, face continous attacks from "living dead" corpses, seeking to eat their flesh. The group, which includes a married couple and their daughter, a pair of young lovers, and an African-American man, try to keep their sanity as the zombies try endlessly to enter the house. Soon, it is determined that, the only way to stop the them, is to burn them or issue a severe blow to their heads. News reports on the radio tell of the ever increasing hordes, taking over the eastern United States, while the small band of survivors rapidly loses ground in the battle to both keep peace with one another and somehow stay alive.
Sure, the film has plenty of cliches and over the top dialogue, still, those are part of the reasons the film works. All one has to do is consider the time period the film was made. In my opinion, the film represents the first time truly "shocking" horror was ever attemted. Up to that time the best one could hope for was science gone awry or things like The Blob. The country itself was in the midst of a turbulent period. Anarchy was almost everywhere. Like the times, Romero's zombies were up front, shocking, in your face, and their numbers were growing. The cast, led by Duane Jones, was filled with no names, who seemed to be there, as much for the experience, as anything else.
The audio commentary tracks feature director Romero and snipets from select crew the surviving cast members. They are very good tracks for both fans and newcommers alike. The extras offers an example of, one of the many aforementioned film parodies, called "Night of the Living Bread". The stills gallery includes a few rare color photos from the production. You'll also get some background and history on Romero's company, called The Latent Image, as well as see scenes from his "lost" film, "There's Always Vanilla"-a treat for fans of his filmmaking style. There's 10 minute video interview with co-star Judy Ridley and the final audio interview conducted with reclusive star Duane Jones in the 80's. You will see a poster gallery, complete with both foreign and domestic release materials, original props, have access to the complete shooting script, and cast members' personal scrapbooks. And last but not least, the disc also has, a series of Romero directed TV spots and Short films--making for not only a tribute to the film but Romero as well--a true time capsule on DVD. Don't forget to read the liner notes by Romero and fellow horror legend Stephen King.
The Millennium Edition DVD has something for everyone and is the proper way to enjoy a true classic--Night of the Living Dead
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5.0 out of 5 stars George A. Romero's classic black & white zombie ghoul movie, May 22 2004
By 
Amazon Customer (The Zenith City, Duluth, Minnesota) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
Once upon a time a young girl and her brother traveled three hours from home to place flowers on the grave of their father. The brother started teasing his sister, telling her in a creepy voice, "They're coming to get you, Barbara." However, the joke ended up being on him because they were coming to get Barbara, only they got him first.
I first saw "Night of the Living Dead" when I came home one afternoon and discovered that the Iowa City Public Library Channel on cable was showing the film. I have to admit, I was rather surprised that this cult classic horror film would be on at a time when kids could come home and discover it on television since one of the living dead is naked and the whole point is that they have risen from the dead to eat human flesh. All of this only goes to prove that "Night of the Living Dead" is a horror movie that is even scary in the daytime with all the lights on and the sun shining brightly through the window.
"The Night of the Living Dead" is a true classic horror film, which is rather surprising when you take into account that director George A. Romero made the film in 1968 for $114,000 without a cast of first time actors (extras who playing the zombies were paid $1 and a t-shirt that said "I was a zombie on Night of the Living Dead"). Filmed in black and white with Romero as the cinematographer, this film has a technical proficiency that is missing from other low-budget classics such as "Dementia 13" and "Carnival of Souls." You can take or leave the various sequels to this film, some of which definitely ahve their moments, but this one has to be on everyone's Top 10 list when it comes to horror films.
The horror comes from the situation and the simple effectiveness of the slow moving, silent zombies in their growing numbers, their arms reaching out to find human flesh to eat. Barbara (Judith O'Dea) runs to an abandoned house, where she is joined by Ben (Duane Jones). After fending off the first attack of the living dead, they discover five more people hiding in the basement: Harry Cooper (Karl Hardman), his wife, Helen (Marilyn Eastman), and their daughter (Kyra Schon), along with a young couple, Tom (Keith Wayne) and Judy (Judith Ridley). Harry wants to hide out in the basement, but refuses to be trapped down there, and the two spend more time arguing about what to do than doing anything. They listen to the radio and watch the TV, learning that the dead are rising to eat the living, and try to figure out a way of getting out of the death trap in which they find themselves. Meanwhile, the little girl in the basement is slipping away.
The only real weakness in the film is the attempt to explain why the dead are walking around as flesh-eating ghouls (a redundantphrase to be sure), which has something to do with a satellite and scientific mumbo-jumbo that really does not mean anything to the people trying to survive against the growing horde of zombies. Fortunately, the "why" does not matter in this story; just the "how" in terms of taking these creatures down. Besides, if anything clinches this one it is the end of the film, both with its final twist, and the use of grainy still photographs to show the end of the tale. Few horror movies, whatever their budgets, have an ending this memorable.
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5.0 out of 5 stars He said "They're coming to get you Barbara," and they were, May 14 2004
By 
Amazon Customer (The Zenith City, Duluth, Minnesota) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
Once upon a time a young girl and her brother traveled three hours from home to place flowers on the grave of their father. The brother started teasing his sister, telling her in a creepy voice, "They're coming to get you, Barbara." However, the joke ended up being on him because they were coming to get Barbara, only they got him first.
I first saw "Night of the Living Dead" when I came home one afternoon and discovered that the Iowa City Public Library Channel on cable was showing the film. I have to admit, I was rather surprised that this cult classic horror film would be on at a time when kids could come home and discover it on television (one of the living dead is naked and they do like to eat human flesh), but Iowa is a state that thinks caucuses are a good way of selecting presidential nominees, so what can I say? But this is a horror movie that is even scary in the daytime with all the lights on.
"The Night of the Living Dead" is a horror classic, which is rather surprising when you take into account that director George A. Romero made the film in 1968 for $114,000 without a cast of first time actors (extras who playing the zombies were paid $1 and a t-shirt that said "I was a zombie on Night of the Living Dead"). Filmed in black and white with Romero as the cinematographer, this film has a technical proficiency that is missing from other low-budget classics like "Dementia 13" and "Carnival of Souls." You can take or leave the various sequels to this film, but this one has to be on everyone's Top 10 list when it comes to horror films.
The horror comes from the situation and the simple effectiveness of the slow moving, silent zombies in their growing numbers, their arms reaching out to find human flesh to eat. Barbara (Judith O'Dea) runs to an abandoned house, where she is joined by Ben (Duane Jones). After fending off the first attack of the living dead, they discover five more people hiding in the basement: Harry Cooper (Karl Hardman), his wife, Helen (Marilyn Eastman), and their daughter (Kyra Schon), along with a young couple, Tom (Keith Wayne) and Judy (Judith Ridley). Harry wants to hide out in the basement, but refuses to be trapped down there, and the two spend more time arguing about what to do than doing anything. They listen to the radio and watch the TV, learning that the dead are rising to eat the living, and try to figure out a way of getting out of the death trap in which they find themselves. Meanwhile, the little girl in the basement is getting weaker.
The only real weakness in the film is the attempt to explain why the dead are walking around as flesh-eating ghouls (which is, I believe, redundant), which has something to do with a satellite and scientific mumbo-jumbo that really does not mean anything to the people trying to survive against the growing horde of zombies. Fortunately, the "why" does not matter in this story; just the "how" in terms of taking these creatures down. Besides, if anything clinches this one it is the end of the film, both with its final twist, and the use of grainy still photographs to show the end of the tale. Few horror movies, whatever their budgets, have an ending this memorable.
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5.0 out of 5 stars one great film, excellent social satire, May 10 2004
George A. Romero's "Night of The Living Dead" is one of my all time favorite movies. Not only is it an excellent horror film (one that helped convince me to pursue cinema as a major in college), but it is also an excellent social satire, exploring the heated race relations of 1960s America. Another interesting element in the film is that there is no strong, central female character. The lead female role, Barbara, slowly deteriorates emotionally throughout the film. She is portrayed as weak and emotionally unstable, while the lead male role, Ben (an African-American), plays the role of the hero. Ben's presence in the film is determined by what he can do for the others in the movie, he acts as the provider and takes charge of the situation. For example, it is his idea to board up all the windows and doors in the house, and even smacks Barbara in one of her hysterical episodes gaining power and control over her. John Berger addresses this idea of men gaining power based on their actions in his book "Ways of Seeing." In contrast, Barbara is a stereotype of the helpless blonde, typical in many horror movies. Her helplessness is not only seen through her deteriorating mental state, but is also shown in other ways. She is shown to be physically weak within the first ten minutes of the film when she trips and falls over nothing while trying to run away from a zombie. While Barbara remains this stereotype throughout the film, Ben's race and gender intersect in a very interesting way. He is a male, therefore he takes charge of the situation that he faces. Typically, he would succeed. However, he is black, and society at this time in America would not want him to succeed. Therefore his character has to die in the end, to comment on the suppression of black Americans when this film was made.
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5.0 out of 5 stars "They're coming to get you....", May 3 2004
By 
S. A. Littleton "orpheus99" (PSJ, FL) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Johnny and Barbra head through the country in route to the cemetery their departed father currently resides at. Though he may not remain dead much longer. George A. Romero's seminal cult classic starts off in a somber tone with an ominous title sequence culminating with his own credit superimposed opposite an American flag. Ostensibly we're witness to a mundane annual trip to the gravesite of a half remembered pops. Johnny and Barbra are siblings, and the former preys on the latter's fear of her surroundings. "They're coming to get you, Barbra!" he insists. It's all in jest of course. Johnny means her no harm. As they depart, Johnny notices an intoxicated looking man lumbering about and exclaims, "Look! There's one now!". As the odd man comes closer he indeed does attack Barbra, and thus begins one of the genres most appealing outings.
Johnny is quick to assist in repelling Barb's attacker, engaging in a fists to cuffs with the gaunt creature. Johnny falls, cracks his head against stone granite, and lies prostate. Barbra's on her own. She decides to make a run for the car, and upon securing herself inside, realizes she hasn't the keys. Oh dear. The odd man isn't so lumbering that it takes him very long to reach Barbra in her steel prison, and soon he's bludgeoning the car's window with a brick. Our protagonist isn't catatonic quite yet however (though she occupies most her later screen time in this state), and she has sense enough to release the emergency break. As she coasts down the dirt road, the odd man staggers after her in a fevered pursuit. The car makes an impromptu stop at the base of a tree, and Barb makes another dash out in this evermore peculiar world. This time she makes it to a more fortified locale, a farmhouse.
Once inside she makes an exploration of the premises. She discovers the phone is out and the owner(s) have a thing for taxidermy. Our heroine seems to be on the brink of a complete mental breakdown when Ben comes crashing in. Now about Ben, well, Ben's the man. He takes charge of the situation going immediately to work on further fortifying the farmhouse. He also relates to Barbra a rather strange occurrence concerning a group of men, not dissimilar to Barbra's pursuer, who were terrorizing people outside a diner. Barb's pretty out of it though, and begins to rave on about Johnny, and demands they go back to his rescue. Such a vehement frenzy she exudes that it behooves our hero Ben to smack her one for her own good.
Later, they discover more people. There are the Coopers; Harry, Helen, and there young daughter who's received a nasty bite from one of the ghouls. Also a young couple; Tom and Judy. They've holed up down in the basement. When Ben asks Harry why he hadn't come up when he heard the screaming, he insists he was unsure if it was of any use. "For all we knew you could have been one of those things!", he exclaims. Tensions run high as Ben claims command of the upstairs and Harry the basement. Both men have good ideas, but refuse to work together. Ultimately, this lack of cohesiveness will lead to their doom.
Night of the Living Dead, much like it's two sequels, isn't so much about the zombies as it is about the relationships between people forced to band together. The farmhouse bunch form a sort of micro colony, and the actions of one effect the well being of them all. It's also very much a product of it's time. Coming out in the same year that saw both the assassinations of Martin Luther King Jr., and Robert Kennedy, and with the war raging on, the movie is certainly indicative of it's time. It also owes a great deal to Richard Matheson's novel "I Am Legend", which also deals with society upheaval.
Beyond that, and why it's truly so endearing, is it's great storytelling. The story unfolds slowly at first and then starts to rip along at a relentless pace. There are many scenes that induce audience participation. Rummaging the farmhouse for supplies, and waiting eagerly for the next T.V. or radio announcement. Then, contemplating the next move of action. The movie really has you becoming involved with the group. The horror elements are all there to, including one very grizzly scene involving a trowel. The films infamous final moments are indelible and certainly do much to solidify it's place in cinema history. Night of the Living Dead is really the beginning of a decade of genre classics. It's gorilla filmmaking style laid the tracks for such classics as The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, and it reminds us of a time when horror films were about a little more than just making you jump from your seat.
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