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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Out Of Africa (blu ray) Universal 100th Anniversary Edition...vast improvement over 2010 BD release.
VIDEO:

This Universal 100th Anniversary Edition release of Out Of Africa arrives at blu ray with MPEG-4 AVC 1080p 1.85:1 encode. Universal's ground-up restoration and subsequent transfer represents a significant improvement over its previously released BD in 2010. Colours have been fine-tuned and primed to perfection. Skin tones are natural. Black levels are...
Published on April 1 2012 by Dr. Joseph Lee

versus
5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Somewhat overrated star vehicle --- I just don't get it
I assumed that any film that rampaged through the Oscars the way this one did would be rewarding on so many levels. I must be missing something. What I saw was a beautifully filmed but rather ponderous vehicle to two mega-stars who circle around each other like glittering birds that do not want to muss their magnificent plumages. Emotionally, I have rarely found a...
Published on May 27 2004 by chefdevergue


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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Out Of Africa (blu ray) Universal 100th Anniversary Edition...vast improvement over 2010 BD release., April 1 2012
By 
Dr. Joseph Lee (Toronto, Canada) - See all my reviews
(TOP 10 REVIEWER)    (#1 HALL OF FAME)    (REAL NAME)   
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VIDEO:

This Universal 100th Anniversary Edition release of Out Of Africa arrives at blu ray with MPEG-4 AVC 1080p 1.85:1 encode. Universal's ground-up restoration and subsequent transfer represents a significant improvement over its previously released BD in 2010. Colours have been fine-tuned and primed to perfection. Skin tones are natural. Black levels are rich. Detail is reasonably refined and generally filmic. (4/5)

AUDIO:

The DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 track remains the same as the 2010 release. And it is still excellent. It provides some wonderfully rich and satisfying recreations of the African soundworld: from the quietest buzzing of insects to the thundering roar of a devastating fire. Dialogue is uniformly front and centre, quite clear. John Barry's soundtrack is also very enjoyable. (4.5/5)

AWARDS:

In 1986, Out of Africa won 7 Academy Awards, including Best Picture and Director for Sidney Pollack, Best Cinematography for David Watkin. Best Original Score (John Barry), Best Sound, Best Art Direction and Best Screenplay.

COMPARISON BETWEEN 2010 AND 2012 RELEASE:

I bought the 2010 release because I could not resist the sale of less than $10. That 2010 release actually houses both the blu ray and DVD versions of this movie on ONE disc! How cheap can one be. The new 2012 release has one BD-50 blu ray disc plus a separate disc for DVD.

As noted above, the video of the latest release is vastly superior to the 2010 one, but does it worth to double dip? Read on...

UNIVERSAL REPLACEMENT PROGRAM:

For those of you who has bought the lousy 2010 blu ray disc, I have good news for you. Universal has started a Replacement Program, applicable for consumers with U.S. and Canadian mailing addresses only.

You have to email them first to request a replacement: [...]

Universal's reply was actually quite prompt and will instruct you the steps to get your free replacement. You have to mail the disc only (without packaging) to the address stated in the email at your own expense, with all the information requested, plus a copy of the email. Hopefully, you will receive the Universal 100th Anniversary Edition version as a replacement. Good luck.

If you have not bought the 2010 blu ray version, this latest release is highly recommended. As usual, Amazon.ca has put in the reviews for the standard DVD version in the blu ray section. Please be careful and check the date of the review before wasting valuable time reading outdated materials.

I hope the review and the above tip are helpful to you.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A song of Africa; and: What price freedom?, April 25 2004
By 
Themis-Athena (from somewhere between California and Germany) - See all my reviews
He often tries to distill his movies' themes into a single word, Sydney Pollack explains on "Out of Africa"'s DVD. Here, that word is "Possession:" The possessiveness of the colonialists trying to make Africa theirs; to rule her with their law, settle on the local tribes' land, dress their African servants in European outfits (complete with a house boy's white gloves), import prized belongings like crystal to maintain the comforts of European civilization, and teach African children to read, to remove their "ignorance." And the possessiveness of human relationships; the claim of exclusivity arising from a wedding license, the encroachment on personal freedom resulting if such a claim is raised by even one partner - regardless whether based on a legal document - and the implications of desire, jealousy, want and need.
As such, the movie's story of Danish writer Karen Blixen's (Isak Dinesen's) experience in Kenya is inextricably intertwined with her love for free-spirited hunter/adventurer Denys Finch Hatton. Just as she spends years trying to wrangle coffee beans from ground patently unfit for their plantation and create a dam where water that, her servants tell her, "lives in Mombassa" needs to flow freely, only to see her efforts fail at last, so also her romance with Finch Hatton blossoms only as long as she is still (pro forma) married, and thus cannot fully claim him. As soon as the basis of their relationship changes, Finch Hatton withdraws - and is killed in a plane crash shortly thereafter, his death thus cementing a development already underway with terrible finality. In her eulogy Karen asks God to take back his soul with its freedom intact: "He was not ours - he was not mine." Yet, both Kenya and Finch Hatton leave such a mark on her that, forced to return to Denmark, she literally writes them back into her life; again becoming the "mental traveler" she had been before first setting foot on African soil, using her exceptional storytelling powers to resurrect the world and the man she lost, and be united with them in spirit where a more tenable union is no longer possible.
While "Out of Africa" is an adaptation of Blixen's like-named ode to Kenya, several of her other works also informed the screenplay; as did Judith Thurman's Blixen biography. And it's this combination which in screenwriter Carl Luedtke' and director Sydney Pollack's hands turns into gold where prior attempts have failed; because Blixen's book is primarily, as Pollack explains, "a pastorale, a beautifully formed memoir [relying] on her prose style, her sense of poetry and her ability to discover large truths in very small ... details" but lacking "much narrative drive" and thus, "difficult to translate to film." In addition, Blixen was largely silent about her relationship with Finch Hatton, which however was an essential element of the story, thus dooming any attempt to produce a movie without extensive prior research into this area.
Meryl Streep was not Sydney Pollack's first choice for the role of Karen, for which luminaries including Greta Garbo and Audrey Hepburn had previously been considered. Looking back in the DVD's documentary, Streep and Pollack recount how his change of mind came about (and ladies, I just know her version will make you laugh out loud). But while unfortunately neither her Oscar- nor her Golden-Globe-nomination turned into one of the movie's multiple awards (on Oscar night alone, Best Movie, Best Director and Best Cinematography, Art Direction, Music and Sound), she was indeed the perfect choice. Few contemporary actresses have her range of talent and sensitivity; and listening to tapes of Blixen reading her own works allowed her not only to develop a Danish accent but to become the story's narrative voice in the completest sense, from Blixen's persona to her perceptions and penmanship.
Much has been made of the fact that as Finch Hatton no British actor was cast but Robert Redford, with whom Pollack had previously collaborated in five successful movies, including the mid-1970s' "The Way We Were" and "Three Days of the Condor." But as Pollack points out, Finch Hatton, although a real enough person in Karen Blixen's life, in the movie's context stands for the universal type of the charming, ever-unpossessable, mysterious male; and there simply is no living actor whose image matches that type as closely as Redford's. Indeed, in this respect his character in "Out of Africa" epitomizes his "Redfordness" more intensely than *any* of his other roles. Moreover, all references to Finch Hatton's nationality are deleted here; so this isn't Robert Redford trying to portray a member of the English upper class, this is Redford portraying Redford (or at least, his public image) - and therefore, it is only proper that he didn't adopt a British accent, either.
Praise for this movie wouldn't be complete without mentioning the splendid, Golden-Globe-winning performance of Klaus-Maria Brandauer, one of today's best German-speaking actors, in the role of Karen's philandering husband Bror. (And if you think he's duplicitous here, rent such gems as "Mephisto" and "Hanussen" - or, for that matter, "James Bond: Never Say Never Again" - and you'll see what creepy and demonic really is when it's grown up). And of course, "Out of Africa" wouldn't be what it is without its superb African cast members; particularly Malick Bowens as Karen's faithful major domus Farah and Joseph Thiaka in his only known screen appearance as Kamante, Karen's indomitable cook. Several fine British actors complete the cast, providing enough British colonial feel even for those quibbling with Redford's casting; to name but a few, Michael Kitchen as Finch Hatton's friend Berkeley Cole, Michael Gough as Lord "Dee" Delamere and Suzanna Hamilton as Felicity (whose character is based on Blixen's friend and rival for Finch Hatton's attentions, Beryl Markham).
In all, "Out of Africa" is a grand, lavishly produced tribute to Africa, nature, freedom, adventure and love: Karen Blixen's "Song of Africa" brought to the big screen - and one of the profoundest love stories ever written by life itself.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, July 3 2014
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Perfect thx!
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5.0 out of 5 stars OUT OF AFRICA, March 7 2014
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This review is from: Out of Africa (1985) (DVD)
Even though this is an older movie, it is a classic. It arrived when it was supposed to and in very good condition. Thanks for taking the care and attention.
Irene Stratton
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4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent movie, Dec 13 2013
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The only problem was the sound, not up to par. Could have been improved. Picture far better than the original.
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5.0 out of 5 stars We loved the movie, it was in very good condition and we were happy to get it., July 26 2013
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It is one of my favorite movies, and I have watched many times and enjoy it very much. I am very pleased to have been able to buy it. Thank you for making it available.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Just as good now as when it came out, July 19 2013
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This movie deserved the Oscars it won. Some movies seem dated, but this one would be in the run for an Oscar even now.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Out of Africa, June 19 2013
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This review is from: Out of Africa (1985) (DVD)
I bought this for a friend who loved the book. I wrapped it so she didn't know what it was. She was so moved. I'd never seen the movie and thought it a little slow at first, but, gosh, beautiful. I want to read the book now. Thanks for making my friend so happy.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Out of Africa, April 6 2013
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This review is from: Out of Africa (1985) (DVD)
One of my favourite movies. Beautiful scenery and cinematography. I have such a fascination with Africa, and its wildlife and people.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful, March 27 2013
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You will never get tired of watching this.The story is timeless and Meryl and Redford and almost un beatable duet.
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Out of Africa [Blu-ray]
Out of Africa [Blu-ray] by Meryl Streep (Blu-ray - 2010)
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