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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A 5 star film given a 1 star treatment for DVD transfer
All the Presidents's Men is a truly wonderful film.
Unfortunately, it was also one of the first films to be released on the DVD format. Because the format was experimental, the studios were not willing to spend lavish amounts of money to create a DVD when the format might not even sell to the public (see Sony's Mini-Disc). So in what was a sound business decision,...
Published on Nov. 4 2000 by Amazon Customer

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars won't play in canada
I've seen this movie a couple of times and really enjoyed it so when it came out in blue ray I jumped all over it. Was totally disappointed that the product had a sticker stuck on the back of sleeve making it look like it was produced in United States but it was actually made in Mexico and won,t play in my blue ray player. I bought this off amazon.ca about 6 months ago...
Published on Feb. 24 2012 by mike nicholls


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5.0 out of 5 stars One of the great journalism movies of all time., April 17 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: All the President's Men (VHS Tape)
Everything you always wanted to know about Watergate, but were afraid to ask. This movie shows the journalism work behind a great story - a dreadfully true story. Monicagaters, take a long look at this story and you'll see what a real threat a president can be to our country. Though this movie only points out Nixon's involvement in the cover-up, his men were guilty of spying on political opponents, those who disagreed with Nixon or pissed him off. It's well documented that Nixon also spied on journalists who wrote unfavorably about him. Nixon exemplified what we should never have in our highest office. And this movie tells the story in a very easy to understand manner. The sad story of the fall of one of my most admired presidents. Do I contradict? I don't think so. Hoffman and Redford are perfect for the roles of Bernstein and Woodward, as is Robards as Ben Bradley in his Oscar winning performance. If this movie doesn't scare the hell out of you as to what our government officials are capable of, nothing will, because it's TRUE!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Complex, Yet Fascinating, April 6 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: All the President's Men (VHS Tape)
Fascinating account of Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein, the two reporters who unraveled Watergate. The acting is top-notch (but how could it not be, with Dustin Hoffman?). The story is complex and leaves you thinking. A favorite. One qualm, though -- the movie had 9 'f' words and was rated PG? Nonetheless, a great film.
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5.0 out of 5 stars DEEP THROAT?, March 5 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: All the President's Men (VHS Tape)
Why does everyone but me think DEEP THROAT was one person? Or even a male? I think DEEP THROAT was two people: Rosemary Woods, and John Dean. Woods leaked the info to try to get him to resign before he went to prison. Dean spewed forth enough to save himself. Rosemary Woods was Deep Throat out of a profound loyalty to Nixon, and Dean was Deep Throat II out of a profound loyalty to himself and his family. Thats what I saw.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great Movie to Recruit Journalism Majors, Feb. 7 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: All the President's Men (VHS Tape)
This is a great movie. During my teens in the 1970s, I never read the book or saw the film of "All The President's Men." I discovered the film during this past year (1998). I love to watch this movie. And I've always liked Nixon and thought he was a great President. To me, whether you supported Nixon or not is beside the point. Watching Woodward and Bernstein slowly and methodically investigate and uncover important information, their dogged determination despite doors being slammed in their faces, made this film exciting to watch from beginning to end. They had the assignment of a lifetime.
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5.0 out of 5 stars It all started with a little something called Watergate..., Nov. 26 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: All the President's Men (VHS Tape)
I cannot appreciate the impact this film had back then. But I can state that writer William Goldman and the late Alan J. Pakula have left a lasting impression in Hollywood's storied history of political scandals. One however cannot underestimate the hard edge, intense performances of Robert Redford (the innocent newcomer Bob Woodward with hidden talents) or Dustin Hoffman (the ingratiating headstrong Carl Bernstein), both of whom infuse immense talent into this tale of Watergate's deception, desperation and ultimately, hope. The foreboding atmosphere... the cynical and sometimes vicious circle of characters... all make for a spark and crackle of a movie. All too true. Once viewed, never forgotten.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The power of an independent media!, May 8 2004
Should one pursue truth at whatever cost? This is essentially what this movie is about if we divorce it from the reality it is meant to represent. At what price should one stop one's pursuit and accept the world as it appears to be? Thankfully, Bernstein (Dustin Hoffman) and Woodword (Robert Redford), or Woodstein as they were 'affectionately' called by their superior, did not put a price on truth, and in their search brought down the highest power in America. This is a great testimony of the power of the media to affect and even change society.
If, like me, you are not completely familiar with the Watergate scandal then watching this movie would be a great way to familiarize yourself with some of the facts. We follow Woodword and Bernstein as they get on the trail of something bigger than anyone expected. Unfortunately, the adrenalin that must have been pumping through both men as they followed leads and made discoveries does not come through in this movie. Most of the time is spent trying not to miss the conversations or squinting to see what is written on the little pieces of paper scattered about.
Some reviewers have called it an American classic and the consensus is that this movie deserves a five star rating. Although I would in most cases agree with the majority opinion I have to dissent here and these are three of my reasons.
Firstly, although the acting was great, there is that missing element of suspense and excitement. Secondly, toward the end, some of the information is presented to the viewer through a typewriter with very small print which makes it quite difficult to read. I should have used subtitles I guess, but this shouldn't have been necessary for a movie in English. Lastly, the extras on the DVD should have at least included a documentary type piece to supplement the movie; instead of assuming that everyone knows all there is to know about Watergate. You may argue that this is just quibbling for its own sake, but to give it 5 stars would be lying to you. That being said, if you can put up with some of the 'faults' that I have listed and have an interest in politics or journalism, then I would recommend this movie to you.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars "I don't mind what you did. I mind how you did it.", March 9 2004
Alan J. Pakula's "All the President's Men" chronicles the investigation that exposed one of the darkest chapters in American history. So profound was the impact of Watergate on the national psyche that the public's trust in its government has never been completely restored since President Richard Nixon resigned from office. Politically and historically, Watergate is a fascinating subject. However, as a subject for a feature film, it is decidedly less captivating.
Washington Post reporters Bob Woodward (Robert Redford) and Carl Bernstein (Dustin Hoffman) are working on a story about a break-in at the National Democratic Headquarters. Nothing seems out of the ordinary at first but the duo soon learns that the Nixon Administration may be involved. Woodward and Bernstein's investigation gains steam and eventually an enormous cash slush fund and mysterious payments to government officials come to light. When all the pieces of the puzzle finally come together, both men discover that they have been pursuing the biggest national story in recent memory.
The life of a reporter is typically not glamorous. Big-time stories rarely fall ready-made into a reporter's lap. Endless hours must be spent chasing leads which might lead to paydirt or might lead to a dead-end. "All the President's Men" captures the life of a reporter perfectly - and that is its problem. Watching Woodward and Bernstein running from one source to another hoping to uncover that one crucial clue that will unlock the mystery that is consuming them generates only minimal excitement. Furthermore, knowing beforehand that the identity of Deep Throat has still not been revealed works against the film because you know in the back of your mind that you are not watching the whole story behind Watergate. In the final tally, Redford, Hoffman and Jason Robards are all great but all three actors are stuck in a film that has few electric moments.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Talk, talk, talk, talk.... Oh Look! They're talking again!, Feb. 27 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: All the President's Men (VHS Tape)
I am not old enough to have even been alive when the Watergateincident occured. As a project for school, I was forced to watch Allthe President's Men, as we are studying the '70s. I found that it was the most boring movie I have ever seen. The entire movie was spent watching Robert Redford and Dustin Hoffman talk to each other, talk on the phone, and talk to people. They threw out so many names that my head was spinning. I found myself just wishing for the movie to end. The highlights of the movie, in my opinion, were the one guy's afro, and the incredibly outdated technology. The movie had only one joke in it, which was funny, but the rest of the movie just dragged on and on. I found that I could not get engrossed in the movie. It was everything I could do just to keep my eyes open. When it was over, everyone was wondering the same thing: did all the movies suck so badly that THIS was the best they could come up with? How else could it have won so many awards? Maybe I am not a fan of journalism movies. If you're really interested in the Watergate scandal, if you like watching people be arrogent, nosey, snobs, or if you want a movie that'll put you to sleep within minutes, then I'd suggest watching this movie. Otherwise, read the following, and then see a better movie: There was a big scandal in Washington. Two reports linked people from all levels of the government to the break in, until they linked the president. (Actually, they don't mention the president as being connected.) The president resigns. End of story. Now you have just saved yourself 2 or more hours. The only thing you've missed is a lot of boring talk. If you really like to listen to that much talking, I'll write the word 'talk' 800 times, and you can read it. Otherwise, take my advice, and don't even bother with this movie. On a scale of 1-10, I would rate this movie -8. It was SO horrible! I'd rather watch Barney, or the Teletubbies for an hour than watch this again!
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0 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars All The President's Wimps, June 13 2002
By 
This review is from: All the President's Men (VHS Tape)
I didn't like this movie very much. I only rented it because Stephen Collins was in it as Hugh W. Sloan Jr. I liked his role because I like him and he's very attractive guy for being 55 years old. I like him best in this movie. He's also very very good as Eric Camden on the hit ABC television show 7th Heaven. Way to go, Stephen!
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0 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars THEN REDFORD MADE THE KENNEDY-STOLE-1960-ELECTION MOVIE??, June 6 2004
"All the President's Men", based on the book by Woodward and Bernstein, was impossible to resist for Redford. Nixon! Oh boy! Again, Hollywood passed up the Kennedy-stole-the-election story. What a shock! You have to hand it to these guys, though; they have talent. "President's" was masterful, thanks in large part to Goldman, who knew how to condense the story. Redford tried to play it close to the vest, and comes close to making it come off as straight and narrow. The actual truth portrayed betrays the lack of objectivity, however, at the Washington Post. Redford is Bob Woodward, a former Navy officer and a Republican. This is revealed to Carl Bernstein (Dustin Hoffman) who gives him a furtive look upon learning this shocking truth. Jason Robards is Ben Bradlee, the Post's editor. We all know the story: The DNC is broken into by Cubans with White House phone numbers in their address books, and in investigating the burglary Woodward and Bernstein suspect a larger plot, which they uncover through dogged journalism that cannot be denied. The two writers are shown to be complete heroes. Hal Halbrooke plays "Deep Throat", the White House insider who gives Woodward the leads he needs to keep investigating. To this day his identity is unknown, and it remains entirely plausible that he was invented out of whole cloth.
The story is the story, and there is no room for liberal bias in that. To Redford's credit, he does not demonize the Republicans or sermonize. Implicit threat against the pair are made, but not expanded into anything. G. Gordon Liddy did volunteer to "off" Jack Anderson for revealing CIA assets in the U.S.S.R., but there is no evidence that Nixon's Republicans ever thought about blowing Woodward and Bernstein away. Domestic political murders, as best as I can tell, are the province of the Democrats. Even in Oliver Stone's "JFK", it is Lyndon Johnson who supposedly was in on the plan to kill the President.
The bias in "All the President's Men" is subliminal, but leave it to yours truly to see it. First, there is the acronym CREEP, which stands for Committee to Re-elect the President. There have been numerous such committees over he years, and they always go by the acronym CRP. But Woodward and Bernstein turned it into CREEP. Gotcha. There is also a scene in which Bradlee, who in real life was a drinking buddy (and God knows what else) of Kennedy's, getting the news that the story is progressing and has real legs.
"You run that baby," he tells Woodward and Bernstein, then does little jig as he leaves the office. This is telling. Redford and director Alan Pakula allowed it, probably because it let them impart their own happiness over Nixon's downfall through the character. In another scene, Robards/Bradlee tells the reporters, "There's not much riding on this. Just the First Amendment and the Constitution of the United States."
Now just hoooold on there, Ben. Was Watergate really about the Constitution? Was that august document threatened? This begs the question, Where was Bradlee and Post publisher Katherine Graham when the Constitution really was threatened by their pal JFK, who stole the 1960 election? Where were they when their pal Bobby Kennedy was wiretapping Martin Luther King? Democrat operatives had to break into homes, hotels and offices to wiretap Dr. King just as the Plumbers had to break into Dr. Fielding's office, and Larry O'Brien's. A free press is undoubtedly the cornerstone of Democracy, but it functions best when it is not populated by over-inflated egos who think they are the soul arbiter of freedom of expression.
STEVEN TRAVERS
AUTHOR OF "BARRY BONDS: BASEBALL'S SUPERMAN"
STWRITES@AOL.COM
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All the President's Men
All the President's Men by Alan J. Pakula (DVD - 2010)
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