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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Time Machine still a timeless classic
Rod Taylor, Alan Young, and Yvette Mimieux star in George Pal's "The Time Machine", a great sci fi movie based on the novel by H.G. Wells.
Taylor plays George an inventor in the late 18th century (1899 to be exact) who makes a machine that can go back in time.
At first his colleagues are skeptical, but when they see George's small model machine that...
Published on July 5 2004 by GreatMovieCriticRobertfromUS

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Warners has done it again!!! Unfortunately!!!
I can understand if a viewer has only seen a VHS release of this film, worse still a rental copy, that this DVD would probably exceed expectations. Some of us though have seen the Laserdisc as well so our expectations of the DVD were a little higher. Frankly, I think Warner has given "The Time Machine" a better than average transfer for Warner. I also don't think that is...
Published on Oct. 3 2002 by Christian Lehrer


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4.0 out of 5 stars Review for "The Time Machine", May 21 2004
By 
Katie Stuart (Gibsonia, PA United States) - See all my reviews
The Time Machine had a great effect on me. I found it to be enjoyable and it had very fascinating theories throughout. What I liked most in the book was the interesting characters, H.G. Wells' style of writing, the parallel of Eloi and Morlocks to society now, how the book always kept my attention, and finally I liked how the narrator left us questioning the conclusion of the novel.
First, I liked how interesting the characters were simply because that is a vital aspect to a good novel. I was impressed by the Time Traveller, and how he was determined to prove his machine to be a success. The characters whom attended his dinners always seemed a little skeptical of his ideas and theories. The Time Traveller explains his discovery of the fourth-dimension and the Psychologist interrupts stating,"You can move about in all directions of space, but you cannot move about in Time" (III.13.16).
The second thing I liked about the novel was the authors' style of writing. Wells remained descriptive throughout the book. For a novel based on imagination and theories, I found it important that Wells had kept some reality in it. (Reality being the descriptive details in the novel.) With all these crazy ideas going on in the book, Wells had to keep our minds somewhat intact to what his visions were. The Time Traveller describes the Eloi's as being "very beautiful and graceful creatures, but indescribably frail. His flushed face reminded me of the more beautiful kind of consumptive-that hectic beauty of which we used to hear so much"(III.34.33.)
Another aspect of the novel I enjoyed, was the parallel of the Eloi and Morlocks to society now. We begin to understand that the Eloi and Morlocks are humans after great evolution and time. It amazed me to see how society completely divided itself between graceful creatures and creatures of the underworld.
The fourth thing I liked was how the book kept my attention the whole way through. I constantly wanted to know what was going to happen next or how the Time Traveller was going to escape the Morlocks and get back to his machine.
Finally, I really enjoyed how the narrator concludes the Time Travellers disappearance. The narrator says,"The Time Traveller vanished three years ago. And, as everybody knows now, he has never returned"(XII.124.18). I liked this because it made you question whether the Time Traveller had vanished into the future forever, whether he had always been from a past time and had gone back, or what was to come of him? So, as it began with one mans' imagination, it ends with your own.
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5.0 out of 5 stars H.G. Wells Classic story is done Proud!!!!!, April 23 2004
By 
Peter Smith "petersm52" (Northern Wisconsin, United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I cannot say how faithful this movie is to the book, however it is an outstanding science fiction movie. The cinematic techniques available for this movie are not as garish as you might see today, but are nonetheless very effective in supporting the cracking screenplay. Rod Taylor's potrayal of Wells is spot on and deserving of special note. The sets are also exceptional with the period furniture and architecture very well done. It is a classic story well adapted to the screen. I recommend this movie to all true science fiction and Time travel fans.
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2.0 out of 5 stars campy, April 9 2004
By A Customer
Part of the problem with TTM, is that it was made in an era where technological restraints made it impossible to duplicate Wells story. Still, the deviation from the book, makes the movie hard to take. It's "Lost in translation".
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5.0 out of 5 stars Time Travel. Morlocks. Eloi. Love. What else do you want?, Feb. 28 2004
By 
MR Ellinas "Nicholas Ellinas" (London, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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You know something, the Eloi remind me of myself.
They are disorientated, not knowing what the hell is going on, and just going places they just don't wanna go, but go, because they don't know that they don't want to go to that place they are going to!!! Read it again, it'll make sense.
This movie is the best of the best when it comes to time travel flicks. George Pal couldn't have done a better book to film transfer. Music is eerie and Roddy taylor is perfect as the time traveller and is believable as a 19th century inventor.
Watch the Documentary on DVD, it's presented by Roddy and is over 45mins long. A must watch.
This is top of my list. A real gem. But I would still rather travel in time in a car, than a sofa chair, that looks like my grannys.
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5.0 out of 5 stars THE TIME MACHINE-OLD VS. NEW, Jan. 30 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Time Machine, the (VHS Tape)
I like the original Time Machine movie of 1960 much better than the new one because rod taylor doesnt just zip into the future like guy pearce who only stops to explore in 2030 ad. then breifly in 2037, taylor does some exploring in both 1917 AND 1966 and stops to examine a dress in a nearby shop and saying a world where everyone is a blue eyed blond causcasian is bad, well the new version where everybody is dark skinned is not an improvement, thats just going from one extreme to another from anglo american in 1960 to african american in 2002.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Go Back In Time With An Old Friend....., Nov. 8 2003
This review refers to the Warner Bros. DVD edition of "The Time Machine"(1960)......
I am so impressed with how this 43 year old classic Sci-Fi film looks and sounds on the DVD, that I am going to start with that this time. I wasn't expecting it to look as great as it did because the editorial review here gives it 3 out of 5 stars on both the picture and the sound. If you are a big fan of this film, or thinking of buying it as a gift for someone who is, you will not be disappointed with this transfer. The picture is presented in the original widescreen format,so you won't miss a bit of the action. To watch it you would think you went back in the time machine to 1960 and were viewing it for the first time. It is clear and sharp with vibrant color.The soundtrack is remastered in Dolby Dig 5.1 and is a welcome enhancement.The DVD also includes a terrific Behind The Scenes documentary called "Time Machine...The Journey Back". The film's star Rod Taylor hosts and fans will love this informative feature. You'll get a good look at how the actual machine was made and the journey that it has taken in the last 40 years as well as other interesting tid bits. This feature has it's own scene selections to choose from or you can just watch it straight through. The film may be viewed in French and has subtitles in English and French.(my only teeny complaint would be that the black bar area is not used for these subtitles, they are at the bottom of the film).
The story based on the novel by H.G. Wells is as captivating today as it ever was. You know the tale.....
George(Rod Taylor)has all the time in the world. He tells his friends an incredible story of his adventures traveling through the ages in a time machine that he has built. As his story begins, he starts out slowly traveling through the 20th century. He doesn't like what he sees. War and destruction seem to be the fate of civilaztion.He pushes foward, quickly, and the years fly by. Finally stopping in the year 802701,he comes across what seems to be a paradise on earth. Clean air,fruit growing in abundance, and a society of young beautiful people, the Eloi, who don't seem to have a care in the world. But even in this Utopian like civilazation there's trouble amiss.The Morlocks are running things from underground and they are just as scary today as they ever were.So it's up to our guy George to save this future civilazation from the evil Morlocks,and try to get back home to the year 1900 for an 8pm dinner appointment..whew,what a great story!
Directed brillantly by George Pal("7 Faces of Dr. Lao"/"Atlantis the Lost Continent"), the film also boasts the great talents of Alan Young, Sebastian Cabot, and the lovely Yvette Mimieux, as "Weena", who adds a little romantic interest to the story. The film was awarded a well deserved Oscar for it's special effects(also discussed in the featurette) for Gene Warren and Tim Barr.The movie is rated G, although the scenes with the Morlocks might be a little scary for very young children.
A great story, fabulous film and an outstanding DVD. So go back in time, with your old friend "The Time Machine"..enjoy...Laurie
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4.0 out of 5 stars Well Made With Political Overtones, Oct. 30 2003
By 
David (Jacksonville, FL United States) - See all my reviews
An anti-war theme is prominent throughout this classic sci-fi flick. In the lead you have Rod Taylor starring as inventor H.G. Wells, a man seeking relief from, and improvement of, the world in which he lives. Demonstrating a miniature version of his time machine for a trio of friends (including Sebastian Cabot of "Family Affair" fame) on New Year's Eve 1899, he laments that he was born in the wrong time...and that he would like to journey into the future to live among more civilized peoples. He desires the utopia that he thinks technology will inevitably bring, but also cries out at the corruption of technology for other than peaceful purposes.
His journey, however, leaves him feeling overwhelmed as it is far from what he expects. He initially watches the years go by from his machine as represented by a manequin he observes in a shop window across the street. There, he views what he regards as a harbinger of societal descent into a more liberal way of life. As fashions change dramatically over the decades, he blushingly remarks, "You call that a dress?". He makes three intermediate stops on his way to his ultimate destination--the first in 1917, the second in 1940, and the third in 1964. They all, conveniently, coincide with raging wars (the final one, a ficticious World War III fought with nuclear weapons that lasts for 326 years).
Embittered and frightened, he moves on, ultimately coming to a stop some 800,000 years in the future. Wells is initially delighted with his new-found utopia and attempts to befriend the native Eloi, a blond-haired, blue-eyed, fair-skinned Aryan race of humans. He is quickly repulsed as he sees them passively watch as one of their own (Weena, played by the lovely Yvette Mimieux) starts to drown only a few feet from the others. After saving her, he learns that they are nothing more than a race of slow-witted, cowardly do-nothings who rely on the sinister Morlocks for survival.
The Morlocks, who look like a cross between the Hulk and the gill man on "The Creature from the Black Lagoon," were the humans who chose to continue living underground after the end of the last war. They deevolved physically and morally and, as a result, developed into ravenous cannibals who fattened up the Eloi so as to devour them at a later date (eating the oldest ones first).
There is no written word within either culture and that lends itself to the theory that cultures tend to stagnate without the written word. Without books there is no learning beyond pure observation and word of mouth and, in this case, both races eventually lost whatever skills and knowledge they once possessed.
Eventually, the Eloi and Morlocks took on a primitive symbiotic relationship. You have the peace-loving, vegetarian, let-nature-take-its-course Eloi one one side, and the militaristic (they still use air raid sirens to hypnotize the Eloi), meat-eating (of a sort), control-your-own-destiny Morlocks. Despite his appreciation for much of the Eloi philosophy--he initially mistakes them for economic genuises--he quickly realizes the truth about them and grows disgusted with their apathetic attitude towards self-improvement and advancement.

Ironically, circumstances dictate him teaching the Eloi the value of fighting (back), a trait he abhorred. As a result, the Eloi defeat the Morlock in a demonstration that while war may be bad it can also be the LESSER of two evils. Still, after their victory, the Eloi are left to answer the question "How do we fend for ourselves now?". Wells chooses to stay among them, returning to his time only long enough to retrieve three books to help them in their journey. In the final scene of the movie, one of the inventor's friends discusses Well's future with Well's housekeeper. He finally asks her (and the audience), "Which three books would you have chosen?".
The film confronts the positives and negatives of pacifism vs. militarism and, in an overall generic sense, liberalism vs. conservatism, all with regard to the survival and growth of a society. Eventually, the movie shows that raging examples of either philosophy isn't the solution--that the true solution resides closer to the middle of the spectrum (with the pendulum tilting into conservative territory.
The story is timeless, the script and acting good, and George Pal's special effects excellent considering the age of the movie. The movie's depth is often overlooked, and it is a worthy addition to any DVD library.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic Classic!, Oct. 16 2003
By 
Rick (Anchorage, Alaska United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Time Machine, the (VHS Tape)
I first saw this movie when I was a little kid, and have watched it at least thirty times since, it had a great impact on my life. The special effects leave a little to be desired, compared to a 'modern' flick, but it's a classic that belongs in everyone's movie library.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Buy this movie and skip the remake, July 25 2003
This one has a simple story of a man in the late 1800s traveling through time. He thought his invention would be laughed at; but little did he know ..... this thing did work! I loved the Morlock cannibals and they are just as scary now as they were all those years ago. The new people of earth could be seen as some of today's generation...in a daze and dependent on big brother to tell them what to do. I don't know if that was part of the original book or George Pals interpretation of it.
All in all if you are looking for a good fantasy adventure, look no further...If you saw this as a child it loses none of it's impact. I wonder what the director George Pal would say if he knew how this movie still stands the test of time and is very important in cinema history.
There is also a short sequel of sorts in the DVD. It was filmed several years later. The characters still come to life after all these years. I wish that George Pal made a sequel way back then. It would have been better than a lot of the material that passed for science fiction in the 60's.
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4.0 out of 5 stars The Time Machine Stands the Test of Time, July 23 2003
By A Customer
When a sci-fi movie has the ability to enthrall you a good 43 years after its original release, then there's no better word to describe it than "classic." And that's just what The Time Machine is, a film that defies time and remains appealing even to those who weren't around, or old enough, to see it back in 1960.
George Pal turns in an outstanding job in the special effects department, never more so than when Rod Taylor, as the inventor of the time machine, sees the world around him moving at fast-forward, then super-fast-forward, then hyper-fast-forward. Sitting in his machine, he sees World War I, World War II, natural disasters, rebuilding and destruction and rebuiding again and destruction again, whizzing by right before his eyes. This is certainly a feast for the viewer's eyes, as captivating now as it was then.
The scientist's final stop: 802,701A.D. Civilization has gone full circle, returning to a primitive state where the Eloi (humans) are the food of the Morlocks (evolutionary throwbacks much like cavemen). There is no electricty, no vehicles, no paved roads, no buildings. The only link to the distant past is a "library" of rapidly-disintegrating books that no one even knows how to read. Naturally, our scientist-hero is appalled at what he sees, and sets out to put the Eloi back on the path towards civilization.
Overall, this is a great film, well worth the price of the DVD because of the outstanding special effects and the insightful script. I would readily have given it five stars if not for one major turnoff: Rod Taylor's acting is the worst thing this side of William Shatner. I'm sure the producers could have done a better casting job than this, but I guess they decided to capitalize on his pretty face.
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Time Machine (Bilingual) [Import]
Time Machine (Bilingual) [Import] by George Pal (DVD - 2010)
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