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on December 15, 2012
Unlike a lot of anniversary additions, this one does include some new content in the way of interviews and various other little extras. The movie is as great as it has always been and I think this is worth the purchase even if you have an earlier DVD release
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Every now and then, someone makes one of those rare movies that crosses the lines of romance, action, fantasy, fairy tale, and a story for all ages. And isn't annoying either. With snappy dialogue and lovable characters, "The Princess Bride" is a classic tale of high adventure, danger, true love, screaming eels, and Sicilians who talk too much. And yes, there's kissing.

A bored little boy (Fred Savage) is sick in bed, is told a story by his quirky grandfather (Peter Falk). In it, young lovers Buttercup (Robin Wright) and Westley (Carey Elwes) are separated when Westley is apparently killed. A few years later, the heartbroken Buttercup is unwillingly affianced to the slimy Prince Humperdinck. As if that weren't enough, she's kidnapped by a trio of mercenaries.

But things go wrong for the mercenaries -- a mysterious masked man is following them, and he defeats each of the mercenaries with his swordplay, strength and wits. He also knows quite a bit about Westley's fate -- and Buttercup soon finds that he IS Westley after all. But Buttercup is only a cog in Humperdinck's evil plot, and now it's up to Westley, gentle giant Fezzik (Andre) and vengeance-seeking Spaniard Inigo Montoya (Mandy Patinkin) to save her.

If "Princess Bride" had been done in a halfway serious manner, it wouldn't have been even remotely interesting. It would have been just another kids' film. But with William Goldman's tongue-in-cheek script and entertaining characters (Miracle Max, anyone?), it becomes something a lot sweeter and funnier.

Rob Reiner has a deft, wry touch that matches Goldman's story, and he does a superb job of keeping the grim moments lighter than they would have been otherwise ("We'll never make it through!" "Nonsense, you're only saying that because no one ever has"). With scenes like the torture machine, Miracle Max and Westley's three duels, Reiner keeps it deadpan rather than openly comic. But there are also scenes of touching romance and reconciliation, and some very good swordfights for Inigo.

And the dialogue (penned by Goldman) is full of quotables -- lines like "Inconceivable!" "My name is Inigo Montoya. You killed my father. Prepare to die," "I'm not left-handed!" and "As you wish" are more or less immortalized. At the worst of times it's solid; at the middling times, it's memorably quirky; at the best of times, it's hilarious.

Yes, the title is about Buttercup. But she's a pretty pallid character compared to Westley, Fezzik and Patinkan. Elwes always seems to be winking at both the characters and audience, while Andre is lovable as the sportsmanlike, superstrong giant, and Patinkan as the discouraged Spaniard searching for a six-fingered man. His clash with the casually evil Rugen is a wonderful action-packed climax.

And Billy Crystal makes a brief but insanely good appearance as the Miracle Man, an embittered medieval healer with a very peeved wife (Carol Kane, who steals the scene with her shrieks of "Liar!").

Crammed with adventure, true love, swordfights, pirates, casual villains, and a clergyman with a speech impediment, "The Princess Bride" is an adorable comic classic. A must-see.
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on August 14, 2010
There is always something new everytime I watch this movie...from the nuances in the dialog to the facial expressions to the obvious enjoyment everyone seems to be having in making the film. It's a fun film to watch and I am sure I'll watch it many more times.
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Every now and then, someone makes one of those rare movies that crosses the lines of romance, action, fantasy, fairy tale, and a story for all ages. And isn't annoying either. With snappy dialogue and lovable characters, "The Princess Bride" is a classic tale of high adventure, danger, true love, screaming eels, and Sicilians who talk too much. And yes, there's kissing.

A bored little boy (Fred Savage) is sick in bed, is told a story by his quirky grandfather (Peter Falk). In it, young lovers Buttercup (Robin Wright) and Westley (Carey Elwes) are separated when Westley is apparently killed. A few years later, the heartbroken Buttercup is unwillingly affianced to the slimy Prince Humperdinck. As if that weren't enough, she's kidnapped by a trio of mercenaries.

But things go wrong for the mercenaries -- a mysterious masked man is following them, and he defeats each of the mercenaries with his swordplay, strength and wits. He also knows quite a bit about Westley's fate -- and Buttercup soon finds that he IS Westley after all. But Buttercup is only a cog in Humperdinck's evil plot, and now it's up to Westley, gentle giant Fezzik (Andre) and vengeance-seeking Spaniard Inigo Montoya (Mandy Patinkin) to save her.

If "Princess Bride" had been done in a halfway serious manner, it wouldn't have been even remotely interesting. It would have been just another kids' film. But with William Goldman's tongue-in-cheek script and entertaining characters (Miracle Max, anyone?), it becomes something a lot sweeter and funnier.

Rob Reiner has a deft, wry touch that matches Goldman's story, and he does a superb job of keeping the grim moments lighter than they would have been otherwise ("We'll never make it through!" "Nonsense, you're only saying that because no one ever has"). With scenes like the torture machine, Miracle Max and Westley's three duels, Reiner keeps it deadpan rather than openly comic. But there are also scenes of touching romance and reconciliation, and some very good swordfights for Inigo.

And the dialogue (penned by Goldman) is full of quotables -- lines like "Inconceivable!" "My name is Inigo Montoya. You killed my father. Prepare to die," "I'm not left-handed!" and "As you wish" are more or less immortalized. At the worst of times it's solid; at the middling times, it's memorably quirky; at the best of times, it's hilarious.

Yes, the title is about Buttercup. But she's a pretty pallid character compared to Westley, Fezzik and Patinkan. Elwes always seems to be winking at both the characters and audience, while Andre is lovable as the sportsmanlike, superstrong giant, and Patinkan as the discouraged Spaniard searching for a six-fingered man. His clash with the casually evil Rugen is a wonderful action-packed climax.

And Billy Crystal makes a brief but insanely good appearance as the Miracle Man, an embittered medieval healer with a very peeved wife (Carol Kane, who steals the scene with her shrieks of "Liar!").

Crammed with adventure, true love, swordfights, pirates, casual villains, and a clergyman with a speech impediment, "The Princess Bride" is an adorable comic classic. A must-see.
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Does anyone NOT love this movie? Whenever the title of this movie is mentioned, there's always a chorus of people responding that it's one of their all-time favorites. "The Princess Bride" is a now-classic tongue-in-cheek fairy tale about adventure, danger, true love, and Sicilians who talk too much.
A bored little boy (Fred Savage) who is sick in bed, is told a story by his quirky grandfather (Peter Falk) -- a story of adventure, pirates, revenge, true love, giants and treachery. Westley, a clever stableboy (Carey Elwes) falls in love with the beautiful Buttercup (Robin Wright, in her first role), but is apparently killed when he goes to seek his fortune. Buttercup is heartbroken. But a few years later, she is unwillingly affianced to the charmingly evil Prince Humperdinck. One day, when riding, she is kidnapped by a trio of mercenaries who plan to start a war by blaming another kingdom for her death.
But things go wrong for the mercenaries -- a mysterious masked man is following them, and he knows quite a bit about Westley's fate. No sooner has Buttercup discovered that he actually IS Westley than Humperdinck brings his "princess bride" back to the castle. Westley, pleasant giant Fezzik, and a vengeance-seeking Spaniard Inigo Montoya (Mandy Patinkin) must find a way to rescue Buttercup and deal with Humperdinck.
Movies very, very rarely are as good as people say they will be. Usually you'll be let down. But "Princess Bride" is unique on its own -- rarely is there so much good acting, good scripting, good direction and such humor. What's more, like "Monty Python and the Holy Grail," it's also become a source of endless quotations -- lines like "Inconceivable!" "My name is Inigo Montoya. You killed my father. Prepare to die," "I'm not left-handed!" and "As you wish" are more or less immortalized now. And while it's a solid story, director Rob Reiner keeps it light and funny.
Usually (though not always) movies are best when adapted by the author, and Goldman did a superb job keeping the grim moments lighter than they would have otherwise been. ("We'll never make it through!" "Nonsense, you're only saying that because no one ever has") Reiner also keeps the direction fast-paced, never quite letting it descend to open comedy but merely keeping it deadpan.
Carey Elwes is extremely good as Westley; he seems to be winking at the audience all through the movie. Mandy Patinkin is amazing as the discouraged Spaniard who's been seeking revenge for twenty years; Andre the Giant is great as Fezzik; Wallace Shawn is uproariously funny as the brainy, shrill-voiced Sicilian Vizzini. And Billy Crystal makes a brief but insanely good appearance as the Miracle Man, an embittered medieval healer with a very peeved wife (Carol Kane, who steals the scene with her shrieks of "Liar!").
For fans of romance, there's Westley and Buttercup; for fans of villains, there's Christopher Guest's Count Rugen (deliciously casual in his evil); for fans of adventure there's swordfights, wrestling, and three men storming a castle. And for those who love comedy, there's the Miracle Man and the clergyman with a speech impediment ("Mawiage: that bwesed awangement, that dweam wifin a dweam.")
This movie has got it all, and people love all it's got. The unlikely heroes and very funny dialogue make this a modern classic. A must-see.
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on August 31, 2000
Any fan of this movie will probably want to hold off on purchasing this "no-frills" version of the William Goldman neo-classic until the inevitable "Collector's Edition" comes out...whenever.
Goldman, who wrote the award-winning screenplay for "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid" and authored "Adventures in the Screen Trade" (standard reading for every Filmmaking 101 course), let his imagination run wild with "The Princess Bride", interspersing modern sensibilities into the fairy tale fantasy.
A collaborative effort, the actors (most notably Mandy Patinkin, Wallace Shawn, and Carey Elwes) as well as director Rob Reiner manage to breathe life into the storybook-like characters, making each of the cleverly written scenes all the more memorable.
While the movie is great entertaintainment for the entire family (doh, I can't believe I just said that), the shadow of a much better special edition on the horizon makes recommending this disc a bit of a catch-22.
Recommended, but at your own risk...
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on May 26, 2004
This movie will make you laugh the first time you see it. The second time you see it you will curse it for its sentimentality. But the sentimentality is purely superficial. The third time you see it you will come to know and mourn its sad tragic core. There are a million improbable rescues in this movie. Our heroes confront a million deadly dangers and by sheer fate, chance, or the perverse will of the script writer our heroes always get off the hook. I do not feel I am giving anything away when I say that. The movie demands to be treated like a sublime, beautiful, and humorous joke. But underneathe all of those escapes and rescues, underneathe the jokes and one-liners, underneathe the sight gags and grand visual frivolity is a darker story. There is a scene ( I won't give it away) where that bold swashbuckler Inigo cofronts Count Rugen - the man who murdered his father. They have a duel and in the last instant Inigo finally tells Count Rugen what he really wants. It is, actually, the one thing Inigo ever wanted in his entire life. That mere sentence, what Inigo says to Count Rugen, is one of the greatest lines in movie history. It is, in itself, the true tragic and spiritual center of the film. All of those escapes and rescues and jokes are totally false. They make us feel good but they lie. The movie itself admits openly that the film is merely a fantasy - a fantasy in the good sense that it ignores the grotesquely limited constraints of realism; but also a fantasy in the sense that it is what wounded children ( all of us) had wished had happened. No one who sees this film will have any regrets.
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on May 10, 2004
The Princess Bride is a timeless romantic comedy directed by Rob Reiner. This entertaining movie is a fairy tale full of charm, humor, and plenty of excitement. Fighting, torture, revenge, giants, escapes, miracles, and true love are among the many thrilling situations that keep viewers on the edge of their seats.
The movie contains a story within a story. It begins with a sick little boy in bed (Fred Savage) and his grandfather (Peter Falk) who comes to visit the boy and read him the story of The Princes Bride. The boy at first is unhappy because he thinks his grandfather is reading him a story about kissing, but he soon realizes that although the story is about true love, it is filled with all types of adventures. As the fantasy part of the story unfolds, both the boy and the viewers are transported to a medieval, make-believe place, Florin, where Buttercup (Robin Wright) meets and falls in love with Wesley, (Cary Elwes) a farm boy, whom she orders around with his only response being "As you wish." They soon fall in love but he decides to leave to seek his fortune, only after promising to return and marry Buttercup. Buttercup then receives news that the Dred Pirates attacked Wesley's ship and that he died. Years later, after being forced to become engaged to the evil Prince Humperdinck (Chris Sarandom), Buttercup is kidnapped by an odd group of three: Vizzini, (Wallace Shawn) the brains of the group; Montoya, (Mandy Pantinkin) a Spanish swordsman; and Fezzick (Andre the Giant) the strong giant. A man in black who turns out to be Wesley pursues the kidnappers and Buttercup. With the help of a wrinkled miracle maker (Billy Crystal), and Wesley's new friends, Montoya and Fezzick, he and Buttercup are reunited and live happily ever after.
Under the thrilling direction of Reiner, and the funny situations created by scriptwriter, William Goldman, the movie can be appreciated by a person of any age. It captures the young crowd with its exhilarating adventures involving fireswamps, swordfights, and sandpits. The movie also appeals to an older crowd because of its clever comedy and romance. Who cannot be amused by Billy Crystal's antics and declarations that Wesley is only "mostly dead?" The plot and the sub-plots are not only well developed but they flow smoothly, supporting the main theme of the movie, which is overcoming obstacles in order to find your "true love." Nevertheless, my only negative comment is that the movie leaves one loose end; you do not know what happens to the evil Prince Humperdinck.
The cast including the actors with cameo roles do a terrific job in connecting all of the characters and subplots. For example, Wesley is trying to reunite with his one true love; along the way he befriends Montoya who is trying to avenge his father's death. Wesley and Montoya both need the help of Miracle Max, who has his own axe to grind with Prince Humperdinck. Other things that are great and visually amazing about this movie are the swordplay scenes between Inigo and Wesley and Fezzik's battles, which are all excellently choreographed.
This movie will definitely become a part of you. You will find yourself repeating some of the movie's well-known lines like, "My name is Inigo Montoya. You killed my father, prepare to die," or phrases such as, "As you wish," "Inconceivable," or "Mawige." It is a funny and enjoyable movie that can be seen over and over again without losing its magic. If you have not seen this movie yet, you are missing out on something special. The Princess Bride is a must have for any home movie collection.
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on January 13, 2004
A classic movie with wit and charm in abundance. This is one of 'those' movies that have such memorable lines that they become part of pop culture. It's a fantasy story about a farm boy (Cary Elwes) who is a servant to a beautiful girl (Robin Wright Penn). He is poor and loves her dearly and she comes to love him. In order to provide for her, he sets off to make his fortune... and the story goes from there.
It is full of quick wit and humor, with cameo appearances by Billy Crystal as 'Miracle Max.' The line of humor tends to be somewhere in the neighborhood of Monty Python, especially in the realm of quotable lines, and Mel Brooks, all with the classic Rob Reiner touches. Cary Elwes does a fine job of being very dry in delivery of his lines while Mandy Patinkin gives a most excellent performance as the mercenary swordsman/ex-drunk in search of vengeance for the killer of his father. It's a flight of fancy that is sure to please if you have a bit-o-wit to keep up with the fine dialogue.
A definite winner.
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on November 25, 2003
The movie starts out with Peter Falk visiting his grandson (Fred Savage) who is sick in bed. To help pass the time, he is going to read him the story of The Princess Bride. The story centers around a girl named Buttercup ( Robin Wright Penn). She is in love with a farmboy named Wesley ( Carey Elwes). He says that he has to leave to make his fortune so that he can return and marry her. However, a lot of time passes, and Buttercup assumes that Wesley is dead. Unfortunately, Wesley finally returns after she has already agreed to marry the evil Prince Humperdink ( Chris Sarandon). Along the way Wesley fights and eventually becomes friends with a giant played by Andre the Giant, and a very talented swordsman Inigo Montoya played by Mandy Patakin. The three use their skills to try and save the princess from making a mistake and to reunite her with her Wesley.
The Princess Bride is a movie that you can watch time and time again and it will still be enoyable. In my opinion, it gets better after each time that you see it. It is an amazing tale filled with fantasy, adventure, and perhaps one of the most well executed romance stories of all time. Cary Elwes, Billy Crystal, Andre the Giant, Mandy Patakin, Chris Sarandon, Christopher Guest, Peter Falk, Robin Wright Penn, and Fred Savage make up the great cast. The Princess Bride brings you adventure, fantasy, an incredible romance story, and a great cast all tied up into one unforgettable film. If there was ever a film that you needed to own on DVD, it was this one. I was extremely happy when it was re-released with the Special Edition. The special features make a very nice addition and let you see the film in a whole new light. I highly recommend this DVD!!
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