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on February 22, 2015
What can I say good that others havent.

The book, the movie, the Special Edition. I have loved them all.

My nieces grew up coming to visit only to ask to see TPB over and over. I can practically quote the movie verbatim.

Im not going to write what the movie is about, there are many here that have expended a lot of energy telling the story. I only hope it entices those that haven't seen it to run to the order page and get it. It is worth much more than money. What it does is elicit every emotion known; which is saying volumes for one little movie. Not many today can say that.

And now the Special Edition. It is truly deserving of the word SPECIAL. You feel like you are part of the family. But I'll let you make up your own mind.

Did I mention that I love this movie? :)
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on December 15, 2012
Unlike a lot of anniversary additions, this one does include some new content in the way of interviews and various other little extras. The movie is as great as it has always been and I think this is worth the purchase even if you have an earlier DVD release
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Every now and then, someone makes one of those rare movies that crosses the lines of romance, action, fantasy, fairy tale, and a story for all ages. And isn't annoying either. With snappy dialogue and lovable characters, "The Princess Bride" is a classic tale of high adventure, danger, true love, screaming eels, and Sicilians who talk too much. And yes, there's kissing.

A bored little boy (Fred Savage) is sick in bed, is told a story by his quirky grandfather (Peter Falk). In it, young lovers Buttercup (Robin Wright) and Westley (Carey Elwes) are separated when Westley is apparently killed. A few years later, the heartbroken Buttercup is unwillingly affianced to the slimy Prince Humperdinck. As if that weren't enough, she's kidnapped by a trio of mercenaries.

But things go wrong for the mercenaries -- a mysterious masked man is following them, and he defeats each of the mercenaries with his swordplay, strength and wits. He also knows quite a bit about Westley's fate -- and Buttercup soon finds that he IS Westley after all. But Buttercup is only a cog in Humperdinck's evil plot, and now it's up to Westley, gentle giant Fezzik (Andre) and vengeance-seeking Spaniard Inigo Montoya (Mandy Patinkin) to save her.

If "Princess Bride" had been done in a halfway serious manner, it wouldn't have been even remotely interesting. It would have been just another kids' film. But with William Goldman's tongue-in-cheek script and entertaining characters (Miracle Max, anyone?), it becomes something a lot sweeter and funnier.

Rob Reiner has a deft, wry touch that matches Goldman's story, and he does a superb job of keeping the grim moments lighter than they would have been otherwise ("We'll never make it through!" "Nonsense, you're only saying that because no one ever has"). With scenes like the torture machine, Miracle Max and Westley's three duels, Reiner keeps it deadpan rather than openly comic. But there are also scenes of touching romance and reconciliation, and some very good swordfights for Inigo.

And the dialogue (penned by Goldman) is full of quotables -- lines like "Inconceivable!" "My name is Inigo Montoya. You killed my father. Prepare to die," "I'm not left-handed!" and "As you wish" are more or less immortalized. At the worst of times it's solid; at the middling times, it's memorably quirky; at the best of times, it's hilarious.

Yes, the title is about Buttercup. But she's a pretty pallid character compared to Westley, Fezzik and Patinkan. Elwes always seems to be winking at both the characters and audience, while Andre is lovable as the sportsmanlike, superstrong giant, and Patinkan as the discouraged Spaniard searching for a six-fingered man. His clash with the casually evil Rugen is a wonderful action-packed climax.

And Billy Crystal makes a brief but insanely good appearance as the Miracle Man, an embittered medieval healer with a very peeved wife (Carol Kane, who steals the scene with her shrieks of "Liar!").

Crammed with adventure, true love, swordfights, pirates, casual villains, and a clergyman with a speech impediment, "The Princess Bride" is an adorable comic classic. A must-see.
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on August 14, 2010
There is always something new everytime I watch this movie...from the nuances in the dialog to the facial expressions to the obvious enjoyment everyone seems to be having in making the film. It's a fun film to watch and I am sure I'll watch it many more times.
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on February 1, 2014
Ce film est un classique et on adore le regarder encore et encore. Romance, action, fantaisie font de cette comédie un chef d'oeuvre en son genre. Je le recommande à tout ceux qui veulent passer un bon moment de divertissement de qualité!
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Every now and then, someone makes one of those rare movies that crosses the lines of romance, action, fantasy, fairy tale, and a story for all ages. And isn't annoying either. With snappy dialogue and lovable characters, "The Princess Bride" is a classic tale of high adventure, danger, true love, screaming eels, and Sicilians who talk too much. And yes, there's kissing.

A bored little boy (Fred Savage) is sick in bed, is told a story by his quirky grandfather (Peter Falk). In it, young lovers Buttercup (Robin Wright) and Westley (Carey Elwes) are separated when Westley is apparently killed. A few years later, the heartbroken Buttercup is unwillingly affianced to the slimy Prince Humperdinck. As if that weren't enough, she's kidnapped by a trio of mercenaries.

But things go wrong for the mercenaries -- a mysterious masked man is following them, and he defeats each of the mercenaries with his swordplay, strength and wits. He also knows quite a bit about Westley's fate -- and Buttercup soon finds that he IS Westley after all. But Buttercup is only a cog in Humperdinck's evil plot, and now it's up to Westley, gentle giant Fezzik (Andre) and vengeance-seeking Spaniard Inigo Montoya (Mandy Patinkin) to save her.

If "Princess Bride" had been done in a halfway serious manner, it wouldn't have been even remotely interesting. It would have been just another kids' film. But with William Goldman's tongue-in-cheek script and entertaining characters (Miracle Max, anyone?), it becomes something a lot sweeter and funnier.

Rob Reiner has a deft, wry touch that matches Goldman's story, and he does a superb job of keeping the grim moments lighter than they would have been otherwise ("We'll never make it through!" "Nonsense, you're only saying that because no one ever has"). With scenes like the torture machine, Miracle Max and Westley's three duels, Reiner keeps it deadpan rather than openly comic. But there are also scenes of touching romance and reconciliation, and some very good swordfights for Inigo.

And the dialogue (penned by Goldman) is full of quotables -- lines like "Inconceivable!" "My name is Inigo Montoya. You killed my father. Prepare to die," "I'm not left-handed!" and "As you wish" are more or less immortalized. At the worst of times it's solid; at the middling times, it's memorably quirky; at the best of times, it's hilarious.

Yes, the title is about Buttercup. But she's a pretty pallid character compared to Westley, Fezzik and Patinkan. Elwes always seems to be winking at both the characters and audience, while Andre is lovable as the sportsmanlike, superstrong giant, and Patinkan as the discouraged Spaniard searching for a six-fingered man. His clash with the casually evil Rugen is a wonderful action-packed climax.

And Billy Crystal makes a brief but insanely good appearance as the Miracle Man, an embittered medieval healer with a very peeved wife (Carol Kane, who steals the scene with her shrieks of "Liar!").

Crammed with adventure, true love, swordfights, pirates, casual villains, and a clergyman with a speech impediment, "The Princess Bride" is an adorable comic classic. A must-see.
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on August 31, 2000
Any fan of this movie will probably want to hold off on purchasing this "no-frills" version of the William Goldman neo-classic until the inevitable "Collector's Edition" comes out...whenever.
Goldman, who wrote the award-winning screenplay for "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid" and authored "Adventures in the Screen Trade" (standard reading for every Filmmaking 101 course), let his imagination run wild with "The Princess Bride", interspersing modern sensibilities into the fairy tale fantasy.
A collaborative effort, the actors (most notably Mandy Patinkin, Wallace Shawn, and Carey Elwes) as well as director Rob Reiner manage to breathe life into the storybook-like characters, making each of the cleverly written scenes all the more memorable.
While the movie is great entertaintainment for the entire family (doh, I can't believe I just said that), the shadow of a much better special edition on the horizon makes recommending this disc a bit of a catch-22.
Recommended, but at your own risk...
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Does anyone NOT love this movie? Whenever the title of this movie is mentioned, there's always a chorus of people responding that it's one of their all-time favorites. "The Princess Bride" is a now-classic tongue-in-cheek fairy tale about adventure, danger, true love, and Sicilians who talk too much.
A bored little boy (Fred Savage) who is sick in bed, is told a story by his quirky grandfather (Peter Falk) -- a story of adventure, pirates, revenge, true love, giants and treachery. Westley, a clever stableboy (Carey Elwes) falls in love with the beautiful Buttercup (Robin Wright, in her first role), but is apparently killed when he goes to seek his fortune. Buttercup is heartbroken. But a few years later, she is unwillingly affianced to the charmingly evil Prince Humperdinck. One day, when riding, she is kidnapped by a trio of mercenaries who plan to start a war by blaming another kingdom for her death.
But things go wrong for the mercenaries -- a mysterious masked man is following them, and he knows quite a bit about Westley's fate. No sooner has Buttercup discovered that he actually IS Westley than Humperdinck brings his "princess bride" back to the castle. Westley, pleasant giant Fezzik, and a vengeance-seeking Spaniard Inigo Montoya (Mandy Patinkin) must find a way to rescue Buttercup and deal with Humperdinck.
Movies very, very rarely are as good as people say they will be. Usually you'll be let down. But "Princess Bride" is unique on its own -- rarely is there so much good acting, good scripting, good direction and such humor. What's more, like "Monty Python and the Holy Grail," it's also become a source of endless quotations -- lines like "Inconceivable!" "My name is Inigo Montoya. You killed my father. Prepare to die," "I'm not left-handed!" and "As you wish" are more or less immortalized now. And while it's a solid story, director Rob Reiner keeps it light and funny.
Usually (though not always) movies are best when adapted by the author, and Goldman did a superb job keeping the grim moments lighter than they would have otherwise been. ("We'll never make it through!" "Nonsense, you're only saying that because no one ever has") Reiner also keeps the direction fast-paced, never quite letting it descend to open comedy but merely keeping it deadpan.
Carey Elwes is extremely good as Westley; he seems to be winking at the audience all through the movie. Mandy Patinkin is amazing as the discouraged Spaniard who's been seeking revenge for twenty years; Andre the Giant is great as Fezzik; Wallace Shawn is uproariously funny as the brainy, shrill-voiced Sicilian Vizzini. And Billy Crystal makes a brief but insanely good appearance as the Miracle Man, an embittered medieval healer with a very peeved wife (Carol Kane, who steals the scene with her shrieks of "Liar!").
For fans of romance, there's Westley and Buttercup; for fans of villains, there's Christopher Guest's Count Rugen (deliciously casual in his evil); for fans of adventure there's swordfights, wrestling, and three men storming a castle. And for those who love comedy, there's the Miracle Man and the clergyman with a speech impediment ("Mawiage: that bwesed awangement, that dweam wifin a dweam.")
This movie has got it all, and people love all it's got. The unlikely heroes and very funny dialogue make this a modern classic. A must-see.
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on July 20, 2000
This is a nearly flawless film, and one of my all-time favorites. But you may want to wait before buying it on DVD. Let me explain ...
This DVD has NO extras. It is simply a bare-bones, non-anamorphic release, and one that is only marginally better than the laserdisc or VHS in picture and sound quality. Before you run out to buy this disc, you should know that MGM is currently working on a special edition DVD of this film, with anamorphic widescreen for release NEXT year. That means if you are a fan of the film, as I am, you are going to have to buy it again next year to get the better DVD.
Why would MGM release it now as a bare-bones disc at all, you ask? MONEY. They know you will buy it now, and they know you will buy it later too.
Buy it if you must, but consider yourself warned.
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on January 9, 2013
Funny funny movie, had to have it. Billy Crystal steals the movie. Received this in just a few days. Didn't expect that.
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