Auto boutiques-francophones Simple and secure cloud storage Personal Care Cook Kindle Music Deals Store Cycling Tools minions

Customer Reviews

83
4.7 out of 5 stars
The King's Speech
Format: DVDChange
Price:$5.88+Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

31 of 32 people found the following review helpful
on February 8, 2011
After seeing The Kings Speech in the theatre, I cannot wait to own it.
A remarkable piece of work...from script, to director, to photography and music,
this film is not to be missed. One doesn't have to be a Royalist, nor indeed,
a history buff, to appreciate the production.
Headed by the inimitable Colin Firth, as King George VI, (Bertie)...one is drawn into
the deep frustration of a solidly good man, adored by his wife and daughters,
who suffers from a debilitating speech impediment, which worsens as he finds
himself faced with the unexpected weight of becoming King, thrust onto his
shoulders. As an actor, Colin Firth keeps getting better and better, from Mr. Darcy
in 1999's Pride and Prejudice, to varying roles across the years, to last year's heart
wrenching, Oscar nominated role, as The Single Man.
Again,the tight facial close-ups, convey a myriad of palpable emotions, which the director
can rely on from Firth, who delivers in spades.
With a fine, talented supporting cast...The brilliant, Geoffrey Rush as King George's
dependable, speech therapist, who becomes his friend...The always amazing Helena
Bonham Carter, as Bertie's loving and supportive wife and Queen...Guy Pearce, excellent
as the self-absorbed, spoiled Edward, who changes history by tossing over the throne for
"the woman I love" and the always solid Derek Jacobi, as the Archbishop.
This is a beautifully crafted film, from the first scene to the closing credits.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
Stammering is a pretty common speech defect, and for most people it doesn't have earthshattering consequences. But for one man, it might have. "The King's Speech" chronicles the true-life story of King George VI's struggle to gain the confidence to lead his nation -- a powerful, tensely-written movie, with some truly brilliant performances.

For many years, Prince Albert (Colin Firth) dreaded any kind of public speaking because of his crippling stammer. So his wife Elizabeth (Helena Bonham-Carter) drags him to a speech therapist named Lionel Logue (Geoffrey Rush), who gives him vocal and physical exercises. Logue also learns more about "Bertie's" psyche -- his sensitivity, his low self-esteem, and his fears that he will let down his country.

And Bertie has never needed help so badly -- his father is dying, his older brother David is too obsessed with his married lover to care about "kinging," and World War II is fast approaching. And when the throne is handed to Bertie, Logue must help him get through his coronation, and a vital speech announcing the beginning of the war.

"The King's Speech" takes place on two very different levels. On one hand, it's about an underappreciated prince's rise to become king just before World War II, and the events that led to it. On the other, it's about one man slowly learning to overcome his fear with the help of a friend.

Director Tom Hooper really knows to create powerful drama even from seemingly small things, and to evoke strong emotions from the simplest scenes. There are some lighter moments (the hysterical scene where Bertie runs around shouting four-letter words) and some glimpses of Bertie and Lionel's lives with their families.

But the strength of this movie lies in the gut-wrenching scenes where Bertie's therapy is put to the test. We see him struggling to speak to his own brother, and it's genuinely saddening when he crumbles into tongue-tied misery... just as it's uplifting when he manages to speak clearly and with earnestness.

And since the movie is all about the king, a brilliant lead actor is absolutely essential. Firth is absolutely perfect -- nervous, fearful, stiff, quick-tempered, and always choking on his own words. And you can see how desperate he is to help his nation. And he has a sort of prickly chemistry with Rush, whose energetic, earnest therapist helps Bertie break out of his shell.

Bonham-Carter gives a lovely smaller performance as the future Queen Mum, a lady with a steel spine who seems to be propping up her husband until he can stand on his own. And there are great smaller performances by Derek Jacobi, Michael Gambon, Jennifer Ehle, and Guy Pearce (as spoiled man-child David).

"The King's Speech" is all about one man helping another overcome his fear, and the world-changing consequences. It's powerful, vivid and beautiful.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Stammering is a pretty common speech defect, and for most people it doesn't have earthshattering consequences. But for one man, it might have. "The King's Speech" chronicles the true-life story of King George VI's struggle to gain the confidence to lead his nation -- a powerful, tensely-written movie, with some truly brilliant performances.

For many years, Prince Albert (Colin Firth) dreaded any kind of public speaking because of his crippling stammer. So his wife Elizabeth (Helena Bonham-Carter) drags him to a speech therapist named Lionel Logue (Geoffrey Rush), who gives him vocal and physical exercises. Logue also learns more about "Bertie's" psyche -- his sensitivity, his low self-esteem, and his fears that he will let down his country.

And Bertie has never needed help so badly -- his father is dying, his older brother David is too obsessed with his married lover to care about "kinging," and World War II is fast approaching. And when the throne is handed to Bertie, Logue must help him get through his coronation, and a vital speech announcing the beginning of the war.

"The King's Speech" takes place on two very different levels. On one hand, it's about an underappreciated prince's rise to become king just before World War II, and the events that led to it. On the other, it's about one man slowly learning to overcome his fear with the help of a friend.

Director Tom Hooper really knows to create powerful drama even from seemingly small things, and to evoke strong emotions from the simplest scenes. There are some lighter moments (the hysterical scene where Bertie runs around shouting four-letter words) and some glimpses of Bertie and Lionel's lives with their families.

But the strength of this movie lies in the gut-wrenching scenes where Bertie's therapy is put to the test. We see him struggling to speak to his own brother, and it's genuinely saddening when he crumbles into tongue-tied misery... just as it's uplifting when he manages to speak clearly and with earnestness.

And since the movie is all about the king, a brilliant lead actor is absolutely essential. Firth is absolutely perfect -- nervous, fearful, stiff, quick-tempered, and always choking on his own words. And you can see how desperate he is to help his nation. And he has a sort of prickly chemistry with Rush, whose energetic, earnest therapist helps Bertie break out of his shell.

Bonham-Carter gives a lovely smaller performance as the future Queen Mum, a lady with a steel spine who seems to be propping up her husband until he can stand on his own. And there are great smaller performances by Derek Jacobi, Michael Gambon, Jennifer Ehle, and Guy Pearce (as spoiled man-child David).

"The King's Speech" is all about one man helping another overcome his fear, and the world-changing consequences. It's powerful, vivid and beautiful.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on February 23, 2011
I can't wait to own this DVD and I hope there are many interesting extras. When I first read about King's Speech, I cynically thought that it would be yet another polished British drama, tailor made for award season. On seeing the film, I was surprised how much I was drawn into the story. It is the best kind of historical drama, one in which the historical facts themselves are interesting enough with embellishing the story. The fact that George VI struggled with a stammer is very well known. I was very pleased that someone finally made him the focus of a historical drama. Usually, movies about this generation of the British royal family are concerned with the drama surrounding abdication crisis and it was interesting to see Edward VIII and Mrs. Simpson as supporting characters in the drama. Guy Pearce makes a wonderfully weak Edward.

The centerpiece of the movie is Colin Firth's performance as Albert, The Duke of York, known to his family as Bertie and, then with the abdication of Edward VIII, King George VI. The performance lives up to the critical acclaim that Firth has received. Firth's George VI is a vulnerable man driven by a sense of duty but struggling with responsibilities that he, as in his former position as the Duke of York, never expected to have. It is also the story of man struggling with a debilitating stutter and with the painful memories of a strict Victorian upbringing.

Luckily for George VI his married life is much happier. Helena Bonham Carter's stout and brilliantly dressed and marcelled Queen Elizabeth is a warm hearted and kind wife, concerned for her husband, but at ease with all she meets. Riding with Bertie in the back of a car, upset by Mrs. Simpson's snide comments about her plump figure, her husband gently teases her, playfully restoring her good humor - the confirmation of a happy marriage. This too is rooted in reality. The real Elizabeth (later known as the Queen Mother) was very supportive of her husband and the animosity between Mrs. Simpson and Elizabeth is very well known.

I have to mention that I once saw the Queen Mother in person. She was visiting the Ontario Legislature in Ontario and that summer I was working as a library page in the legislature's law library. I remember that she was wearing a beautiful bright turquoise georgette dress and that she had the loveliest complexion and a very warm smile. She seemed to me to be e veryone's ideal grandmother, but also one who also liked her gin. As soon as I saw a publicity still in which Boham Carter tilted her head to one side as the Queen Mother did, I knew she would be wonderful in the role.

The king was also fortunate in his choice of speech therapists. Geoffrey Rush's Lionel Logue, an unorthodox therapist and much worse, as an Australian in England, he is an outsider in the medical community. He is tough his royal patient, demanding to put aside Bertie's social sation, but his methods prove effective enough to help his royal client. This isn't the first speech therapist that the Duke has seen and in a montage, it is fascinating to see how primitive speech therapy was in the thirties. Over time the two men eventually become friends. I liked Rush's performance. I have never seemed him so relaxed and comfortable in a role. In another year he would be guaranteed all the major awards, but unfortunately this year he has to compete with Christian Bale's showier role as a drug addicted ex-boxer in the Boxer.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on May 22, 2011
This movie is a must see. It is performed with sensitivity by the actors and the whole production has been put together superbly. Firstly the abdication from the throne in pre-war Britain. Followed by HRH's speech impediment and how he made tremendous efforts to overcome them with the help of an 'expert' who became a lifelong friend is most interesting. Add to this struggle a loving wife and the drama of wartime Britain, plus the filming inside Buckingham Palace and St James' Palace, make it a drama not to be missed.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on May 12, 2011
I like Colin Firth... Okay I have a serious crush and he is brilliant in this piece. We gave this film to our 88 year-old mom who is an avid royal watcher and despite its use of the "f" word, which would normally relegate the film to the trash for her, she loved it! The film does an excellent job of portraying the burden of being a royal (and I'm no monarchist). While the job has its perks, what other job are you automatically relegated to by birth no matter what your personal inclinations and have your every move and word recorded for posterity? Although George VI's exposure to instant mass media was tame by modern standards, he was a very ill-equipped figure for modern media relations. A stutter in those days was a sign of mental infirmity and the film does an excellent job of presenting the anguish that poses for a public figure like George. It's also nice to see a film that celebrates speech therapists, a group of unsung heroes who work amongst us. The film does an excellent job of portraying the tedious and painful process of speech therapy for those who have speech difficulties, though the emotional theory of stuttering while revolutionary for that time, is now a little dated.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on April 15, 2011
I love this movie. I am drawn to film about British royals anyway, but with Colin Firth, Helena Bonham-Carter and Geoffrey Rush (and Firth being re-united with his Sense and Sensibility co-star Jennifer Ehle), how could this go wrong. Fantastic script. It is witty, quick and we get a little bit of a slap towards the end almost reminiscent of `A Sixth Sense' when we are fooled as well (won't tell) - we find ourselves thinking back as well to how we did not notice a certain important fact. A high point is when Rush's character and Firth meet for the first time, telling him that he should not smoke. Doing this from memory: `But my doctors tell me it's good for me' says Firth. `They're idiots' says Rush. `They have been knighted' retorts Firth. `Then it's official.' remarks Rush. I love it. Watch this movie, it is very good.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on March 29, 2011
It's rare I actually go to a theatre to see a movie, but I'm so glad I went to see this one. Colin Firth and Geoffrey Rush are at their very best. Helena Bonham-Carter in a smaller role is marvelous as usual. I'm so pleased that Oscar recognized this low-budget movie. Superbly directed and produced and the lighting, which is something I don't always appreciate, is something to be seen. Hopefully you've got a big screen (I don't) to truly appreciate everything that this movie has to offer.

True story, as we know and yet even in this day and age it's so relevant as regards bullying in general. This should be a required must-see for all kids in school.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on May 18, 2011
The King's Speech is a wonderful film full of rich performances from the two leads Colin Firth and Geoffrey Rush.both are outstanding in their respective roles.Firth plays.Prince Albert,who in time becomes King George VI,who has a stuttering problem and yet has to address his subjects by radio.he seeks help from a speech therapist named Lionel Logue(Goeffrey Rush)to overcome his affliction.Helena Bonham Carter is good in a supporting role as well.the film won four Academy Awards and it's easy to see why.it's very compelling and the story is well told.it's well paced,and is never boring.i'd watch it again.for me,The King's Speech is a well deserved 5/5
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on June 17, 2011
This one definitely deserved its Best Picture Oscar. It's gripping and moving, and shed to me what was surprising new light on George VI's problems that I'd never heard of before. I was only about 8 when Elizabeth II was crowned, so most of British royalty before her time comes to me from the history books (I'm American by birth and upbringing, live in Canada now), and this story certainly wasn't included in what I was taught.

Definitely well worth the modest cost.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this item also viewed

The Queen (Bilingual)
The Queen (Bilingual) by Helen Mirren (DVD - 2007)
CDN$ 9.62