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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Final Cut as nature intended in its full glory
Pink Floyd's The Final Cut was originally released in April of 1983. The album was the first Pink Floyd album of new material since 1979's 23 million plus seller The Wall. The album was mainly the work of Roger Waters(bass player/vocals) with muted contribution from drummer Nick Mason and guitarist/vocalist David Gilmour. Keyboardist Rick Wright was kicked out the band...
Published on June 29 2004 by Terrence J Reardon

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Pink Floyd's "Final Cut" Remastered and Restored!!
Pink Floyd's 1983 album "The Final Cut" is a sadly underrated gem in the band's vast music catalog. While the album lacks the strong musicality of "The Dark Side Of The Moon" and "Wish You Were Here" and the dramtic theatrics of "The Wall", "The Final Cut" still qualifies as a strong effort and is an outstanding piece of...
Published on May 28 2004 by Louie Bourland


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Final Cut as nature intended in its full glory, June 29 2004
By 
Terrence J Reardon "Classic rock guru" (Lake Worth, Florida, USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Pink Floyd's The Final Cut was originally released in April of 1983. The album was the first Pink Floyd album of new material since 1979's 23 million plus seller The Wall. The album was mainly the work of Roger Waters(bass player/vocals) with muted contribution from drummer Nick Mason and guitarist/vocalist David Gilmour. Keyboardist Rick Wright was kicked out the band during The Wall sessions by Waters. The Final Cut was supposed to be the soundtrack to The Wall movie but instead became a gloomy vivid portrait of a morally crumbling post-WWII/Falklands War era England. The album is fixated on the second World War and what the personal and societal sacrifices of that conflict meant to Great Britain in 1982/1983. "What have we done to England?/Should we shout, should we scream/'What happened to the post war dream?'" lyricist Roger Waters asks on the opening The Post War Dream. Throughout the album, Roger(whom had lost his father in World War II) explores that inquiry. Your Possible Pasts are taking shots at then UK and US leaders Thatcher and the late Ronald Reagan, which dates this song slightly. The main character in this album is the teacher from The Wall whom was disappointed in the generation they preserved (One of the Few and The Hero's Return), trying to keep a fellow serviceman's dream alive(The Gunner's Dream which is one of the album's best tracks), pursued by ghosts (Paranoid Eyes). Get Your Filthy Hands Off My Desert is great and is followed by my favorite song on the album The Fletcher Memorial Home which depicted Thatcher and Reagan as overgrown infants and tyrants(though I did like Reagan but c'est la vie). Southampton Dock was about Thatcher waving goodbye to the men and not about wives waving their husbands goodbye to go to war. The title cut is a great song too. Not Now John is a superb rocker and was the only Gilmour vocal on the record(him and Roger fought like mad and David took his name off the credits but still got paid to produce the album). The haunting Two Suns in the Sunset closed the album. Session Andy Newmark plays drums on this track as Nick was forced out as well. By the time this album was finished, Pink Floyd broke up. The album was a #1 album in the UK but in the US, The Final Cut hit #6 and sold a modest 2 million in the US but was a flop compared to its predecessor. In May of 2004, The Final Cut was reissued/rereleased with a slightly amended tracklisting featuring When the Tigers Broke Free, which was originally recorded for The Wall Movie and intended to go on The Final Cut but was left off as they felt the song was out of place. Ironically, the song works very well throughout the context of the album. At first, it was strange hearing this track after One of the Few because the clocks faded and then bang into The Hero's Return on the original Columbia issues. Now, with Tigers in tow, this is the true version of The Final Cut. The sound quality on this reissue buries the original Sony remaster from 1997 and James Guthrie(one of three co-producers on the original album) painstakingly remastered this album with much better sound. I sold the Sony version of this album after I bought this. This expanded version of The Final Cut is highly recommended!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Pink Floyd's "Final Cut" Remastered and Restored!!, May 28 2004
By 
Pink Floyd's 1983 album "The Final Cut" is a sadly underrated gem in the band's vast music catalog. While the album lacks the strong musicality of "The Dark Side Of The Moon" and "Wish You Were Here" and the dramtic theatrics of "The Wall", "The Final Cut" still qualifies as a strong effort and is an outstanding piece of work.
"The Final Cut" is largely a solo work by Floyd bassist Roger Waters with drummer Nick Mason and guitarist David Gilmour acting more as sidemen than bandmates. Floyd keyboardist Richard Wright was completely out of the picture when this album was made having left (or fired by Roger Waters depending on what you read) after the extravagant "Wall" tour. The rest of the album's sound is filled out by session musicians and a full orchestra.
The album's overall concept deals with war and politics and was written as a tribute to Roger Waters late father who died in WWII. Besides its strong musical contributions, "The Final Cut's" lyrics are gripping and seem almost autobiographical. Its content alternates back and forth between contemplative tenderness and ranting raging bitterness (a trademark of Waters).
The newly remastered version of "The Final Cut" displays the album in its best sound quality yet giving more punch to the drums and bass. The sound effect sequences heard throughout the album have an eerie realistic quality to them as if you're standing in the middle of a war zone. If this isn't enough, the reissue includes one bonus track "When The Tigers Broke Free". This song had been released as a single at the time of the "Wall" movie's release but was left off the "Final Cut" album for various reasons. Now, we can finally hear the song in its proper context slotted between "One Of The Few" and "The Hero's Return". It's like reading a missing chapter in a book and having the rest of the story make sense because of its inclusion.
While "The Final Cut" is personally still not my favorite Pink Floyd album, it is still a great album to listen to. With its superb remastered sound quality and extra material, it makes it worth buying the album all over again.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A superb album, June 30 2014
By 
This review is from: The Final Cut (Audio CD)
this album is a lyrical masterpiece!! some tireless great musical ideas too! but is - too depressing to receive my five stars!!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not your average Floyd, July 10 2004
By 
Patrick "Patrick" (Baltimore, MD United States) - See all my reviews
"The Final Cut" is not for you if you are searching for "quintessential" Pink Floyd. This album finds Roger Waters in complete creative control of the band (at this point a trio due to Richard Wright's expulsion). David Gilmour's solos are few and frequently far between, and Waters' brooding lyrics are clearly the centerpiece of this melancholy work. Imagine the "sedate" parts of "The Wall" (i.e. "Nobody Home" and the beginning of "One of My Turns") and you have nearly the entire "Final Cut" (with the exception of "Not Now John".) The effect is that the music is a texture, rather than a discernible melody, and sometimes this is great (as in "the final cut") However, it sometimes makes the music sound fabricated and unoriginal ("Behind Paranoid Eyes"). Overall, I believe it to be a great collector's item, but not a "must-have" for fans of the pre- "Wall" Pink Floyd.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars File under Roger Waters rather than Pink Floyd, June 11 2004
Pink Floyd's last studio album to feature Roger Waters is getting a full audio polish and having the track, 'When the Tigers Broke Free, mixed into it's running order. WTTBF was originally written by Roger Waters for the Pink Floyd film 'The Wall and has only ever appeared on the album 'Echoes - The Best of Pink Floyd. A 7" vinyl release did appear in 1982, and curiously has a sticker on the front that read, "from the forth coming Pink Floyd album - The Final Cut." At the time the next Pink Floyd album was going to be a medley of songs from the film, first titled 'Spare Bricks then 'The Final Cut. As Roger watched the Falklands War unfold, he felt moved to write an album that looked at the post war dream. When 'The Final Cut album was finally released in 1983 there was no WTTBF or any music from the film, 'The Wall.
Between July and December of 1982, 'The Final Cut was born via various recording studios in England. Pink Floyd no longer featured Rick Wright who had played out the live 'Wall shows (1980 and 1981) knowing he was no longer required as Pink Floyd's keyboard player. His replacement on the next Pink Floyd record would be Michael Kamen; who would play piano and harmonium on the album. While Rick Wright didn't appear on the album at all, David Gilmour, who's vocal requirements on 'The Wall had been more sparse than previous Pink Floyd albums, would now only sing lead on one song 'Not Now John. Indeed Dave's very recognisable guitar solos would also hardly appear on the album, it seemed Roger saw 'The Final Cut, more as a solo project. In sound and vocal delivery 'The Final Cut has far more in common with Rogers' solo album 'The Pros and Cons of Hitch Hiking, than any previous Pink Floyd albums. History would show that 'The Final Cut was Rogers last studio album with the Pink Floyd, his announced quitting of the band in 1985 did not surprise those close to the band or journalists who had witnessed close at hand the defragmenting of the band over the last 10 years. 'The Final Cut, is a very personal record for Roger Waters, something that is only fully understood when you discover the small dedication in the CD booklet, "For Eric Fletcher Waters 1913-1944, Eric was Roger's father who was killed during World War II. The subtitle for the album is 'a requiem for the post war dream. Roger's strong belief and concern that ran through the album, was that the promise of peace, post the second world war was being ethically and morally compromised.
As advertised on the circular sticker on the outer case of the CD, this album is remastered, but wasn't the 1997 reissue of 'The Final Cut also remastered. Well yes it was but, it is common knowledge that the understanding of digital transferring and the techniques now mastered by James Guthrie; have seen a huge leap in the abilities to remaster original analogue master tapes. Auditioning this new remastered version through headphones, reveals a fantastically rich sound and the space between each instrument is instantly recognisable. The CD booklet is also exactly the same as the 1997 reissue, which is 16 pages revealing additional art work over the 1983 original album release. The inclusion of the track 'When the Tigers Broke Free, has aroused some comments of concern but after a few plays it becomes part of the over all story and while Roger's vocal delivery on it does differ from the other songs on the album, the placing between the tracks 'One of the Few and 'The Hero's Return doesn't detract in any way the natural running order of the story. A pre-release CD was sent out (many thanks to Stuart) which comes in a simple paper cover with track details. In some European Countries a white label video EP was sent out as a promo item, this originally fuelled hopes that the OOP video EP might get a re-release but EMI and Pink Floyd Management Ltd (previously EMKA) have revealed there are no such plans. Although the album failed to chart in the UK this time, (in 1983 the album reached No. 1 with poor reviews!) it did receive positive reviews via the music press.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Completely underappreciated..., May 5 2004
By 
Matthew Graybiel "theunabeefer" (Chico, CA United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
First of all, I wouldn't go as far as to say that the added track is "unecessary" as it was originally supposed to be on this album anyways, and the subject of the song fits quite well with the theme of the album. Personally, whenever I heard the end of the song, in my mind I expected "The Hero's Return" to begin.
I gave the new remaster 4 stars of 5, because they REALLY should have included "The Hero's Return Part 2" ... Those of you who have heard that bit would probably agree with me on that.
Positives though, I have never heard this album sounds as crystal clear... the entire album doesn't sound even HALF as muddy as it used to. I didn't know HOW they could've made it better until I actually HEARD it. There were background vocals and sound effects I only BARELY heard before. Roger's whispering on parts sounded more like singing. It's just a beautiful remaster altogether and gave me a new appreciation for this project.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Waterlogged Pink Floyd, Jan. 28 2003
By 
"vertigothom" (Grand Rapids, MI USA) - See all my reviews
The nadir of Pink Floyd's recorded output, The Final Cut began life as a dumping ground for leftover songs from The Wall and soundtrack versions from the film of the same name. In the end, the soundtrack songs never made it onto the album. Of the leftovers -those that were considered not good enough for The Wall- Floyd guitarist Dave Gilmour said that if they weren't good enough to release before "what makes them any good now."
Gilmour is right on the mark: the songs on The Final Cut rank among the worst in the bands history. There is a complete lack of melody on the entire album; the songs are slow, plodding and limp. One is hard pressed to even consider this a rock album. It is the ultimate spit in the eye of Syd Barrett's Pink Floyd, which was full of fun, excitment and musical inventiveness. The Waters lead Floyd heard here sounds more like a man occasionally waking himself up from a deep sleep by snoring too loudly.
Since Waters completely dominated the band on The Final Cut all musical considerations are secondary to his half-sung lyrics. And Waters is, without a doubt, one of the worst singers in Rock, meaning that this is a worst case senario. In fact, a case can be made for never listening to the album again.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Lest We Forget, Nov. 11 2011
This review is from: The Final Cut (Audio CD)
It took me years to fully appreciate this album. It is fragmented and today it is dated in its 1980s references to Thatcher and the Falkland war. Some pieces, like "Not Now John" are clearly out-takes from "The Wall". But even with these issues, it is the first album I reach for in my Remembrance Day commemorations every November 11. Roger aptly captures the psychological effects of war and the sheer lunacy that gets us into it. As the references to the Cold War and the fears of nuclear holocaust (Two Suns in the Sunset) time-stamp this album ever further into the past, I hope that my children will never really understand what this album is about.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Sounds Better!, Oct. 12 2006
By 
Musically, this was not one of my favourite Pink Floyd albums, though the lyrics are commendable for their criticisms of war and corporate greed. But this 2004 remaster is a much better listen because of the improved sonic clarity. And the rightful inclusion of "When the Tigers Broke Free" after 20 years adds a bit of a pick-up to the first part of the album. This new edition sees more time on my playlist.

Also recommended: Dark Side, The Wall, Amused To Death, Echoes
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5.0 out of 5 stars There's a kid who had a big hallucination, July 11 2004
By A Customer
At first listen this album does not seem like much. It doesn't have the killer singles the wall had. It doesn't have the experimental sounds of dark side of the moon. But this album is beautiful, its dark, and it is probably the best thing Floyd wrote. The unusual song structures, the almost speaking rather than singing, the personal accounts of what Water's has been through, its an album that changes views on more than music. It tears the world apart and is very relevent to present times. Where we have come from and where we are going. If you are going to buy a Floyd album get Dark Side, get The Wall but do not skip this!
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