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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars GOD BLESS HIM INDEED...
I'd like to start off by stating the following; I liked Black Sabbath more when they had Ronnie James Dio as their lead singer than Ozzy, however I do love Ozzy's solo work, but I also felt that Ozzy's reality show turned him into a pathetic cartoon caricature of his former self (and in my opinion the same can be said about Gene Simmons and Tommy Lee).
So thank God...
Published on Feb. 21 2012 by Paul S. Power

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Falls short of being the ultimate Ozzy documentary film
I was thrilled that someone from the Ozzy camp, namely Osbourne's own son Jack, was going to make a documentary on the Prince of Darkness. I thought it would be great since Jack is Ozzy's son, he's been there for a part of his life and has seen some things and he has access to any information on Ozzy really. Maybe I set my hopes up a little too much, God Bless Ozzy...
Published on Nov. 25 2011 by Tommy Sixx Morais


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars GOD BLESS HIM INDEED..., Feb. 21 2012
By 
Paul S. Power "Music Reviewer" (Nova Scotia, Canada) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
I'd like to start off by stating the following; I liked Black Sabbath more when they had Ronnie James Dio as their lead singer than Ozzy, however I do love Ozzy's solo work, but I also felt that Ozzy's reality show turned him into a pathetic cartoon caricature of his former self (and in my opinion the same can be said about Gene Simmons and Tommy Lee).
So thank God for this DVD. It is the redemption Ozzy Osbourne needed, and deserved. We, the viewer, get an unprecedented look at John Michael Osbourne's upbringing in the impoverished working class section of Birmingham, England, much of which is documented by his 3 sisters and brother. Throughout this DVD we also hear from Tony Iommi, Geezer Butler and Bill Ward as they detail Black Sabbath's meteoric rise to the heights of rock and roll fame, and all the trappings, pitfalls and vices that followed.
It's only through the involvement of Ozzy's son Jack that such intimate moments were able to be captured by filmmakers Mike Fleiss and Mike Piscitelli over a 2 year period. I'll bet that this is the first place most people will ever see Ozzy's son and daughter (Louis and Jessica) from his first marriage to Thelma Riley, or see his 'seldom seen in the media' daughter Aimee. Of course, it was Sharon Osbourne who stood beside Ozzy, through thick and thin, and has been in his life in one capacity or another since 1979. Sharon saved Ozzy's life and career. She absolutely shines in this documentary.
The best bits on the DVD actually come from the man himself, as a more intelligible (read clean and sober, inspired by son Jack's sobriety) Ozzy reminisces on old days through old photographs of a life lived bold as brass. The most touching moments come when Ozzy talks about the time his first wife asked for a divorce, how he wished he could have had a "man to man" talk with his dad before he passed away, Ozzy misses him dearly. His dad actually made the first Black Sabbath cross for Ozzy. You can also see the heartache and sense of loss on Ozzy's face when he talks about the death of legendary guitar player and close friend Randy Rhodes. This is an Ozzy we've never seen before-the one Jack wanted to reveal in this documentary film.
There's a cool sequence in the film (at the 12 minute mark) shot in Halifax at Ozzy's Metro Centre concert, with great clips from die-hard Maritime Ozzy Osbourne fans. It's pretty neat to see this. The DVD's extras include a question and answer session with Ozzy and Jack; a look at this film's debut at the prestigious Tribeca Film festival and some footage not seen before in the original theatrical release.
I love documentaries, especially "rockumentaries" and this truly is the best one I've ever seen. Ozzy Osbourne always seemed to bee a larger than life character, a living legend; in this film we see a man who is a down to earth, contemplative soul. God bless Ozzy Osbourne!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Falls short of being the ultimate Ozzy documentary film, Nov. 25 2011
By 
Tommy Sixx Morais (The Great White North) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: God Bless Ozzy Osbourne (Blu-ray) (Blu-ray)
I was thrilled that someone from the Ozzy camp, namely Osbourne's own son Jack, was going to make a documentary on the Prince of Darkness. I thought it would be great since Jack is Ozzy's son, he's been there for a part of his life and has seen some things and he has access to any information on Ozzy really. Maybe I set my hopes up a little too much, God Bless Ozzy Osbourne is a entertaining documentary film but I feel they were merely scratching the surface here and in this case more would have been better. Fans can tell right away that this documentary is a few years old already. It shows Ozzy's 60th Birthday party which is three years ago now. The most recent live performances show Ozzy with Zakk Wylde and Wylde appears in the documentary in some spots.

In one of the more revealing moments of the documentary, Ozzy's two children with his ex-wife Thelma, Jessica and Louis are interviewed. Jessica almost sounds like she's angry at her dad and doesn't say much positive things, there's a lot of negativity aimed at her dad and from her angle it's quite understandable His son Louis is clear about the fact that Ozzy was never really a dad to him and he also express frustration that his dad can't remember his birthday. Ozzy is asked in what year his daughter was born and he replies "71, 72 I don't know. I'll find out for you" and then you can see water in his eyes, even behind those sunglasses. He says he did the best he could with his first two children given the circumstances. I thought the way Sharon analyzed the period of Ozzy's life in which he left his wife Thelma and moved on to Sharon was fairly accurate and set things in perspective. He was fired from Black Sabbath, he already had children and wanted to start a new family with Sharon. Her angle on this and how it affected Ozzy was great. I think maybe the best interview of it all may have been Kelly Osbourne's. She obviously suffered from her dad's crazyness and it had an impact on her. Today she's really happy that her dad has been clean for so long. Jack's interview is similar to his sister and he reveals that when he stopped drugs and alcohol that's when Ozzy decided to stop.

Most of the major events in Osbourne's life addressed. His upbringing in Birmingham, his first wife, his kids, Black Sabbath, going solo, the death of Randy Rhoads, strangling Sharon, reality tv dad and so on. The interviews with musicians and other people were passable but Tommy Lee and others don't say a whole lot that fans aren't already aware of. His Black Sabbath bandmates Geezer Butler and Bill Ward were both interviewed and it was nice to see them here. I love the scene where Ozzy's sitting on his couch at home watching his own music videos and he goes "these are cliché f***ing 80's videos!". He soon enough proceeds to leave and he is asked "Ozzy where are you going?" to which he replies "Taking a walk, watching this f***ing s***...". Priceless. Seing Ozzy's preparation for a show was fascinating, I didn't know he did the things he did. I wished he would've talked about Jake E. Lee because he is pretty much never talked about, yet he was a great guitarist and made important contributions to both Bark At The Moon (1983) and The Ultimate Sin (1986).

I enjoyed watching God Bless Ozzy Osbourne but here's the problem: it's not long enough to cover everything. I mean this is Ozzy, the Sabbath years alone would take their own documentary and add to that Ozzy years, his personal live, the rumors, the crazyness, the madness of it all... and you'll realize an hour and a half (1h33 minutes to be more precise) is simply too short. Some of the interviews were revealing and interesting, all in all it's a good entertaining hour and a half doc on the legend that is Ozzy but even so you will learn little more than the documentaries on Ozzy that have already been made. For a fan this is something that should be seen, but I was a little disappointed because knowing that they had all the resources to make the ultimate Ozzy documentary it could have been longer and better.3/5.
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God Bless Ozzy Osbourne (Blu-ray)
God Bless Ozzy Osbourne (Blu-ray) by Ozzy Osbourne (Blu-ray - 2011)
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