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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A frontier remote yet familiar
I first saw this on premium cable and had to own a copy. The movie's portrayal of the versatility of the single-shot cartridge rifle was very welcome. ("I never said I didn't know how to shoot a pistol - I just never had much use for one." Great line in a great scene.) Laura San Giacomo was wonderful and Alan Rickman was perfect as Alan Rickman always is. I'm...
Published on Aug. 6 2003 by Eric C. Sanders

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3.0 out of 5 stars a great cowboy
Matthew Quigley is a sharpshooter from the old west who answers a job advertisement and ends up in Australia. Once there he hooks up with Crazy Cora and founds himself at odds with his employer when he finds out his true job.
Tom Selleck was born to play a cowboy. He looks totally at ease in the saddle, he doesn't look like a Hollywood pretty-boy when he dresses...
Published on Feb. 2 2002 by Gerald Booth


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A frontier remote yet familiar, Aug. 6 2003
By 
Eric C. Sanders (Macomb County, Michigan) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I first saw this on premium cable and had to own a copy. The movie's portrayal of the versatility of the single-shot cartridge rifle was very welcome. ("I never said I didn't know how to shoot a pistol - I just never had much use for one." Great line in a great scene.) Laura San Giacomo was wonderful and Alan Rickman was perfect as Alan Rickman always is. I'm pretty sure the portrayals of the Australian aborigines was authentic, too. The story is pure Louis Lamour - it had me checking my collection for forgotten classics. (Lamour did not write this.) Basil Pouledoris composed a score that deserves a soundtrack album. This is one of those movies that are perfect for a sick day or a snow day - an all-time classic.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A solid, satisfying western!, July 14 2003
This is a very satisfying western. Tom Selleck stars as Matthew Quigley, a sharpshooter of some reputation that is contracted by a ranch owner in Australia, ostensibly to keep vermin from destroying his land. It soon becomes clear, however, that the ranch owner, Elliott Marston (played wonderfully by Alan Rickman) wants Quigley to do a great deal more than knock over dingoes.
Selleck is the rightful heir to the throne of John Wayne. He projects the same strength of character that Wayne did and has the same quality that Wayne did when on camera - the viewer's eye is drawn to him regardless of who else is in the shot. He simply seems to fill the screen. His acting has always been underrated. There are few actors working that seem so natural and at ease in front of the lens (Tom Hanks comes to mind.) Also, Selleck is an experienced gun owner, and his handling of the 1874 Sharps Rifle in the film is extremely true to life and accurate all the way. He just seems in his element handling a rifle, or the Colt SAA six-guns he uses toward the end of the film.
The real surprise in the film was the performance of Laura San Giacomo. Nothing from the TV series Just Shoot Me ever gave an indication of her acting chops. Here, she gets to stretch out, and she makes the best of it. She is a very fine actress, it turns out. She plays the part of Crazy Cora, a woman who is just hanging around the ranch. When we first meet her, she is clearly crazy. Suffice to say that as the movie progresses, she becomes a romantic interest for Quigley.
There is a truly remarkable scene where, in the quiet of a camp at night, she relates the incident in her life that broke her, drover her mad. It is not an easy scene to play, and she handles it perfectly - very understated and very, very moving. It was very pleasant to see, also, a woman in a western that was not just there for pretty scenery or to play off the hero, thereby developing the male character. No. In this film, Cora is a character that has scenes all by herself, using a gun just fine. When the cave scene comes (and you will know it when it comes) watch the light flare in Giacomo's eyes as she finds her strength and fights back - truly a force to be reckoned with.
The Cora character grows and develops a great deal in the course of the film, which is no easy trick in a 90 minute movie. If you are not a Selleck fan (as I am), watch his movie for Laura San Giacomo. She is terrific.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Tom Selleck's best ever, Feb. 5 2003
By 
Chrijeff (Scranton, PA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Quigley Down Under (VHS Tape)
Like many TV actors, "Quigley"'s star Tom Selleck gave much attention, during and after his small-screen career, to attempting to break into movies. If he'd been born in 1926, instead of 1946, he would probably have gained fame, not as Thomas Magnum, but in Western films and/or TV series like this one. Quigley is the role he was born to play, and in Quigley's adventures he has made, to my mind, the best movie of his career.
This slam-bang actioner, though often labelled a "Western," actually takes place, not in the American West, but in the Crown Colony of Western Australia, probably around 1875 (there are still convicts there). Selleck plays Matthew Quigley, a soft-spoken marksman from Wyoming, who answers an advertisement by Australian rancher Marston (Alan Rickman) for "the finest long-distance marksman in the world." After three months on a sailing ship, he steps ashore at the port of Fremantle, where he promptly gets into a brawl with what turn out to be three of Marston's men, come to meet him, and is mistaken by displaced "native-born Texian" Crazy Cora Cobb (Laura San Giacomo) for her husband Roy. At Marston Water he offers a display of his skill with his primary weapon, a customized Sharps .45 buffalo gun, and impresses everyone, including Marston, who describes himself as "a student of your American West" and is a fast draw, pinpoint-accurate, and quietly proud of it. Only now does Quigley find out that he was being hired, not to kill dingoes (Australian wild dogs) as he thought, but to clear Marston's lands of the native Aboriginies. He promptly throws Marston out the French window of his own house, but is eventually overwhelmed by Marston's crew and, with Cora, taken out to the desert to die. Managing to kill the two men who fetched them there, he recovers his rifle and big Stetson, but loses the buckboard and horses. Trying to walk out, he and Cora are found by a clan of Aboriginies, who take them in, and when a group of Marston's men appears to hunt the natives down, Quigley takes up his Sharps in their defense. Eventually he eliminates Marston and all but three of his men in a sort of one-man "long hunt," climaxed by a shootout in which, though wounded and battered and admitting that he "never had much use" for handguns (he doesn't even carry one), he kills three men so fast that his shots sound like one.
Though there's a good deal of violence in this video--in fact, it will probably be too intense for kids under the age of 12 or so--none of it is gratuitous: each instance either serves to further the story in some way or is portrayed as an inevitable result of the choices and character of the person acting or being acted against. Selleck's Quigley is a '90's version of the classic John Wayne hero: soft-spoken, quietly competent, modest and unassuming (he "spent a night" in Dodge City once, and describes it as "a nice place to get some sleep"), chivalrous toward women and even a little unsure of how to react to them. (His early interactions with San Giacomo's Cora, on the Fremantle docks and in their first outback camp, add a whimsical touch to the movie's tone and should draw laughs from all watchers.) He also has an iron code of behavior, and he doesn't hesitate to learn even from the primitive Aborigines: one of the most delightful sequences finds them teaching him to use a spear-thrower and to suck water out of the sand through a bamboo--after which he repays them by conducting a class in the making and proper use of a rawhide lasso. Rickman is the kind of villain you love to hate: smooth, silky, sneering, yet acting from what seem to him to be completely valid reasons. San Giacomo may be "touched in the head," but she's also earthy, practical, and fiercely loyal to Selleck and to the orphaned Aboriginie baby they find; her story of how she came to be in Australia is touchingly delivered.
And, like most of the best movies, "Quigley" can serve as a starting point for some penetrating family discussion. Parallels will quickly be seen between the Aborigines' situation and, not only the experiences of the American Indian, but the "ethnic cleansing" through which the former Yugoslavia suffered, and which kids may have studied in school. Quigley seems not to be revengeful against Marston and his crew of 20-odd tough English and Irish until they act against the Aborigines who have been his and Cora's friends, and even then a case can be made for his killing as many of them as he can hit: afoot and outnumbered, he doesn't want them in the area and angry at him; after the second Aboriginie drive and the accidental killing of a storekeeper's wife, he is simply resolved to keep them from doing any more harm.
Though action is the movie's keynote, it is above all the story of how three people inspire one another to certain inevitable acts--in short, like all the best stories, it turns on character. And its characters will remain in the memory for a long time to come. (A side-benefit is the blood-stirring score by Basil Poledouris, which was one of the first CD's I ever purchased.) The cinematography gives a powerful sense of the size and loneliness of the Australian outback (filming was done in Alice Springs and other Australian locations), as well as of how important it is that Quigley seems far better able to adjust himself to it than Marston's men are willing to do. Director Simon Wincer, though not of American birth, has turned out a movie which, while not strictly a "real" Western, should become a classic of the genre. By my criteria, it's definitely a 10--or perhaps even a 12.
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5.0 out of 5 stars DOWN UNDER AND OVER THE TOP., Jan. 29 2003
By 
DAVID L. WOOD (ROCKSPRINGS TEXAS USA.) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Quigley Down Under (VHS Tape)
WHEN THIS ONE CAME ALONG IN LATE 1990, WESTERN FANS WERE IN A DROUGHT. 'DANCES WITH DOGS' WAS HARDLY A RIGHTEOUS COWBOY FLICK, BUT "QUIGLEY" WAS AN EXCEPTION.
SIMON WINCER OF 'LONESOME DOVE' FAME WAS THE GENIUS BEHIND THE CAMERA AND TOM SELLECK WAS THE ONE OUT FRONT. FORGET THAT ITS SET IN AUSTRALIA. THAT IS INDEED UNIQUE BUT A WESTERN IS A WESTERN AND THIS ONE FILLS THE BILL NICELY.
THERE HAD BEEN A FEW T.V. WESTERNS AROUND THE SAME TIME BUT THEY WERE LACKLUSTER BY COMPARISON.
SELLECK, ALONG WITH SAM ELLIOTT MAY BE OUR ONLY HOPE FOR QUALITY HORSE OPERAS IN THE FUTURE. TOM SELLECK, AN AVID HUNTER AND GUN ENTHUSIAST JUST LOOKS RIGHT HOLDING A SHARPS OR ANY OTHER FIREARM FOR THAT MATTER.
IN THIS YARN HE IS MATTHEW QUIGLEY RESPONDING TO MARSTEN'S WANT AD FOR A LONG RANGE RIFLEMAN. THE BAD GUY PLAYED BELIEVABLY ENOUGH BY ALAN RICKMAN HIRES THE AMERICAN COWBOY ON THE PREMISE OF SHOOTING WILD DOGS, BUT HE ACTUALLY WANTS THE SHARPSHOOTER TO ANILATE THE NATIVE ABORINEES TO SETTLE AN OLD SCORE.
WHEN QUIGLEY LEARNS THE TRUTH HE TURNS THE TABLES AND BECOMES THE NATIVES "GHOST WARRIOR" PROTECTING THEM AND SNIPING MARSTEN'S (RICKMAN) HENCHMEN FROM WAY OUT YONDER.
THE SCORE IS GREAT WITH BIG MUSIC MUCH LIKE THE GREAT WESTERNS OF THE SIXTIES.
QUIGLEY IS FORCED TO ACCEPT A DISCARDED WOMAN (LAURA SOMETHIN ANOTHER) AS A SIDEKICK. THE WOMAN'S JUST "A BUBBLE OFF THE PLUMB, AND THATS FOR SURE AND FOR CERTIN." QUIGLEY SPOUTS, BUT THE GIRLS AILMENT IS A CHARADE AND ROMANCE FOLLOWS. THE BANTER BETWEEN THESE TWO IS HILARIOUS.
BUT THE WESTERN ACTION CARRIES THE PICTURE AND THE MOST TRUE OF COWBOY FANS WILL BE PLENTY SATISFIED BY THIS ONE.
I CANT THINK OF ANYTHING REALLY CRITICAL TO SAY ABOUT THIS FILM.
WHEN IT PREMIERED I WAS SO HUNGRY FOR A GOOD WESTERN I ATE IT UP LIKE CHILI AND CRACKERS.
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4.0 out of 5 stars An unusual sort of Western, Dec 28 2002
By 
"zinnias9" (Ohio, United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Quigley Down Under (VHS Tape)
Quigley arrives in a strange place for an American cowboy, in a shipyard in Australia. He's there to check out a possible job, to shoot dingoes--or so he thinks. Unfortunatly, he is dropped into a cultural conundrum. He's seen the slaughter of native Americans, and here he is in Australia and his prospective boss wants him to kill native Australians, not dingoes. What does he do? Well, being that he is a "good" cowboy...he's soon on the run. Somewhere along the way, he rescues a semi-lucid woman who seems to be struggling her way out of a personal Hell. Then the movie slows down for awhile as he tries to escape the bad guys and deal with the woman who thinks he's someone else. More adventures ensue, with a final showdown, of course. It is a "thinking" western, that is, the cowboy has seen some very bad things in the past, and he wants to make things better, if only temporarily. It isn't all bang,bang,bang gunfire all the way, there are times for some talk around the fire as well. Some might think it is a slow movie because of that. I'd rather have some slowness and thought than simple brainless constant action and reaction. This is a good movie, don't miss!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Tom Selleck Westerns are authentic and action packed !!!, Oct. 26 2001
By 
forrie (Nashua, NH United States) - See all my reviews
Tom Selleck is one of the Best Hollywood cowboy since John Wayne. Selleck makes it his job to portray and with his asserted effort makes his western characters very believable.
In "Quigley Down Under" beautifully shot in Austrailia. Selleck plays an American sharpshooter (Matthew Quigley)who answers a want ad regarding the needs for a sharpshooter. Quigley's ability to shoot and hit accurately targets greater than 1000 yards is a very interesting twist to this 1850's Austrialian western.
In Summary: This movie provides all the "John Wayne ingredients". From the beginning brawl upon Quigley's arrival in FreeMantle to his departure with heroine sidekick (Laura San Giacomo) the story moves quickly and the action constant.
Quigley is hired by a villian ranch owner (Alan Rickman) to kill varmits which are cluttering his land who have learned to stay out of range of the conventional rifles. Quigley quickly demonstrates his ability to hit targets in excess of 1000 yards with his special custom rifle and ammunition. He finds out quickly though the varmits are Aborigine's (the native Indian type people of Austrialia) and he protests and fights the owner. Overtaken and beaten by many ranch hands / gunfighters is cast in the Austrialian outback with crazy girl to die. With the best story line and heroic abilities survives and seeks vengence with the help of the Aborigines and the crazy girl.
A great action pack western beautifully photographed with a twist. Excessive violence PG-13 is the only precaution for the young observers.
Widescreen Anamorphic makes it outstanding for viewing on those widescreen HDTV's. A nice making of extra is included. The musical score adds to the enjoyment.
Tom Selleck is one of the great new Hollywood Cowboys. So buy this (a great value) and watch his other westerns they're great!!!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Tom Selleck Westerns are authentic and action packed !!!, Oct. 26 2001
By 
forrie (Nashua, NH United States) - See all my reviews
Tom Selleck is one of the Best Hollywood cowboy since John Wayne. Selleck makes it his job to portray and with his asserted effort makes his western characters very believable.
In "Quigley Down Under" beautifully shot in Austrailia. Selleck plays an American sharpshooter (Matthew Quigley)who answers a want ad regarding the needs for a sharpshooter. Quigley's ability to shoot and hit accurately targets greater than 1000 yards is a very interesting twist to this 1850's Austrialian western.
In Summary: This movie provides all the "John Wayne ingredients". From the beginning brawl upon Quigley's arrival in FreeMantle to his departure with heroine sidekick (Laura San Giacomo) the story moves quickly and the action constant.
Quigley is hired by a villian ranch owner (Alan Rickman) to kill varmits which are cluttering his land who have learned to stay out of range of the conventional rifles. Quigley quickly demonstrates his ability to hit targets in access of 1000 yards with his special custom rifle and ammunition. He finds out quickly though the varmits are Aborigine's (the native Indian type people of Austrialia) and he protests and fights the owner. Overtaken and beaten by many ranch hands / gunfighters is cast in the Austrialian outback with crazy girl to die. With the best story line and heroic abilities survives and seeks vengence with the help of the Aborigines and the crazy girl.
A great action pack western beautifully photographed with a twist. Excessive violence PG-13 is the only precaution for the young observers.
Widescreen Anamorphic makes it outstanding for viewing on those widescreen HDTV's. A nice making of extra is included. The musical score adds to the enjoyment.
Tom Selleck is one of the great new Hollywood Cowboys. So buy this (a great value) and watch his other westerns they're great!!!
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4.0 out of 5 stars Good old fashoned western, Dec 31 1999
By 
W. Priebe "WFP" (Houston, TX USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Quigley Down Under (VHS Tape)
As the title character, Matthew Quigley, Tom Selleck, plays an American sharpshooter hired by an Australia landowner, Elliot Marston (Alan Rickman) to kill dingoes. On arriving in Australia, Quigley immediately becomes entangled with Crazy Cora (Laura San Giacomo) who thinks he is her husband. When Quigley and Cora arrive at Marston Waters, he finds that he has been hired to kill Aborigines instead of dingoes. He objects by knocking Marston through double glass doors. Marston has both he and Cora beaten and left in the Australian desert to die. Saved by Aborigines, Quigley spends the rest of the movie protecting both them and Cora from Marston ending in an old fashioned OK Corral type shoot-out.
The plot is weak - typical western fare with very good "good guys" and very bad "bad guys" - but the actors are exceptional. Selleck plays his typical take all comers, macho man who can out fight and out shoot any man, but has absolutely no idea what to do with a woman. His total inability to deal with Crazy Cora is hilarious and the heart of the movie. San Giacomo's portrayal of Cora is excellent progressing from crazy to sane as her relationship with Selleck adds stability (as an aside, there is ~16" in height difference between Selleck and San Giacomo, but excellent photography hides the fact until the end of the movie). Rickman, as always, is the best bad guy a movie director could ask for. His evil sneer should be copyrighted.
If you are looking for in depth character development, deep, intellectually challenging dialog, and conscience raising social statements, you may want to forego this one. If you want a relaxing evening with enough action to be interesting and comedy to keep it light hearted, this may well be just the movie for you.
I saw the movie both on the big screen, television and VSH version. The television version stinks. It is so cut that it completely destroys the movie. The VHS version is okay, but it just does not do justice to the incredible photography of the Australian landscape nor the outstanding musical score. I look forward to the DVD version if it is ever released.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Selleck plays John Wayne, and quite well..., May 16 2000
This review is from: Quigley Down Under (VHS Tape)
In this movie Matthew Quigley (Tom Selleck) responds to an Australian rancher's ad for the best marksman in the world. We soon meet and begin to loathe the rancher, a rich, abusive man who thinks he's hired Quigley to shoot aborigines. Quigley has other ideas -- and thus we embark on a traditional, but successful, good- versus-evil plot that is found in most westerns.
As the movie progresses there is good character development, and not only of the primary characters, but of other supporting characters as well.
I particularly enjoy the portrayal of the aborigines as people. They are much more than the sub-human group that the rancher sees them for.
Give this movie a look, and you will see that Selleck does the western tradition proud. John Wayne doesn't need to move over, but I'm sure he would welcome Selleck as a colleague.
Good stuff...action, a touch of romance, and a classic confrontation at the conclusion.
4 stars, bordering on 5!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Quigley Down Under, Aug. 27 2000
By 
Lecy Pritchett (Katy, Tx. United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Quigley Down Under (VHS Tape)
Quigley Down Under is absolutely the most exciting, beautiful, and breathtaking Western I have ever seen. John Wayne would have stood up and cheered for Mr. Sellecks portrayal of Mathew Quigley. From the beginning of the movie, Mr. Selleck brings Quigley across of a man of strenght, with a heart as big as his Sharp rifle. Alan Rickman, as Ellot Marston, is, as always, the man you love to hate. Laura San Giacomo, as Crazy Cora, makes your heart go out to her thoughout the movie, and makes you understand just why Quigley's heart was hers for the taking. This movie has it all, from the beautiful scenery, to the exciting shootouts, you'll find yourself laughing, crying, and most of all feeling you've just seen the best movie ever. The chemistry between Mr. Selleck and Ms. San Giacomo is perhaps the best ever, those two should definately work together again. This is one that should have a Part II. See It.......Now.
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