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4.3 out of 5 stars
Gone with the Wind (Limited Edition SteelBook) [Blu-ray] (Bilingual)
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30 of 35 people found the following review helpful
on February 17, 2004
Please note that my disappointment was in no way with "Gone With the Wind" itself, which is, as we all know, is one of the greatest movies of all time. I couldn't say anything about this wonderful film that hasn't been said already. This big, lush, box set, however, left a lot to be desired.
Let's start with the 8 original limited edition lobby card prints. They're obviously colorized, and hideously so. Mammy in a neon pink headdress? The same neon pink as the stripes on the soldier's pants at the charity bazaar? I don't think so. And excuse me, the dress Scarlett wore when she fled from Atlanta and for some time after that was lavendar, not French's mustard yellow. Nor is anyone's skin that "flesh" color, ever.
Moving on to the 6 original black and white photograph cards (and why would you print black and white photos of a beautiful color movie like this, anyway?)...I could have done a better job on my home computer, with screen captures. The pictures, which include Rhett at the bottom of the stairs seeing Scarlett for the first time, are very blurry. Even the close up of Rhett and Scarlett about to kiss (after Frank Kennedy's funeral) isn't clear.
The 35 mm film frame I received was of Rhett bidding Scarlett farewell on the road to Tara; the accompanying art graphic is very dark and muddy. I have to hold the film cell up to bright light to even see it, so forget about framing it.
The 27x40 movie poster was very nice, and I'll end up getting a frame to display it.
The DVD lists its "special features" as interactive menus and scene access; isn't that pretty much standard by now? The extras consist of a trivia game (you don't guess the answers, they'll give them to you on the next screen) and the movie trailer. That's it. One of the greatest films of all time, and that's the best you can do? What about the excellent documentary "The Making of a Legend: Gone With the Wind"? I have that on VHS and it's wonderful. That could have been added to make a two disc set.
I'd wanted "GWTW" on DVD for a long time, and instead of buying the much less expensive DVD (where I could have had a choice of standard or widescreen versions), I had to hold out for the big box set. I wonder now why I bothered.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on January 21, 2013
Gone with the Wind looks great in Blu-Ray. The visual power of the film comes through in a way no previous home video release could match. Sherman's march through Atlanta has never looked more terrible. The Tara that was never looked so opulant, and its destruction has never been so dramatic. The film is a revelation in high definition.

Unfortunately, that's not the only revelation when opening this package. The Amazon catalogue description lists a whole range of enticing bonus features which are not actually part of this package. This steelbook edition is the feature film, and a companion lecture by Rudy Behlmer about the film and the people who made it. It's a lecture filled with interesting information, but perhaps half of his commentary is biographical information about David O. Selznick and Vivian Leigh and Victory Jory and Leslie Howard and other members of the creative team that made this artistic achievement.

This edition is for those who would be quite content to watch the film on Netflix or iTunes, if only they offered a true high definition picture. If that would satisfy you, then this edition will satisfy you. But if, like me, you look forward to things like "8 hours of revealing extras about this timeless classic including more than 3 hours new to the collection," this edition will be a little shallow. The Scarlett edition is probably the one you want to hold out for.

I did purchase this from Amazon, but with a little regret returned it when I found the advertised bonus features were not included. Great film, but a sadly lacking Blu-ray package.
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on November 19, 2001
Gone With the Wind is a classical movie of the 1939's, the theme is about of the civilization of the south and their peaceful life style. A life of a rural plantation life that is trying to survive and protect their culture against the evils of the industrial revolution and enjoy life of luxury without the pollution of the industrial machines and their riff raffs; the history and the view that the south portrays in this movie is all about what they gained and lost because of the civil war and reconstruction. Of course the portrayal is not a 100% historically accurate and the movie downplay to mention too much about the cruelty of slavery and how the racial discrimination, which was lowly presented (lets be serious 1939, lack of cultural understanding makes sense not many would dare to talk about it in the silver screen), was view by the free blacks and slaves of the south that had to endure for many years before the idea of freedom was accepted and before the civil rights movements, but yes it is there, not bad neither nice. One of the problems with the movie if that it focus on the lost of the glorious south but doesn't mention or fully explains the consequences of such life style, the price of slavery and plantation life and how it happened or how all the issue of slavery and anti-slavery began; it lacks explanation of slavery, the good and the bad sides of it (when you study history you notice this things) to fully educate the public, that the issue of slavery is a human issue and that the southerners and the northerners are guilty of it because they were too human and too ignorant of our modern views (they cannot be blamed but that is not justification for anyone), maybe is me but I love historical accuracy in movies. This movie is a good (but not the best) portrayal of the south's point of view, it will differs with the north's or with any ones but given the understandings of how the southerners view slavery, not because of arrogance or ignorance but because of the lack of cultural understanding and modern enlightenment. For anyone who wants to know more about slavery one should read "The Wages of Whiteness" by David R. Roediger to know why white southerners (and also northerners, no one is innocent) lacked common sense about slavery and the faults of their ancestors and first settlers, a deeper understanding of white identity and the disasters that followed by 'psychological wage', also there is a lack of understanding of the house servants and their important central role in plantation life which is not fully explained in the movie, their role are important that is why I recommend reading "Ar'n't I a Woman?" by Deborah Gray White and read the chapter about Mammies. I don't blame the south's slavery issue; one who studies the past must not blame but understand without pointing the finger; the issue of slavery was not the south's problem but also an issue of the north, it was a national issue which is not view or explain in the movie. I think is time to look hard and beyond the lines and words and find the issue of slavery was not a state or individual or social fault but a historical and cultural issue waiting to become a ugly issue in American history but there are also interesting things one can learn about slavery and the human will if is willing to open and carefully look. The movie is a good tool to understand the south's life style and what they were trying to protect, the Jeffersonian ideals of a agricultural economy and private property, but the explanation is only half backed, for those who want to learn more look at these books that I mentioned.
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on November 19, 2001
Gone With the Wind is a classical movie of the 1939's, the theme is about of the civilization of the south and their peaceful life style. A life of a rural plantation life that is trying to survive and protect their culture against the evils of the industrial revolution and enjoy life of luxury without the pollution of the industrial machines and their riff raffs; the history and the view that the south portrays in this movie is all about what they gained and lost because of the civil war and reconstruction. Of course the portrayal is not a 100% historically accurate and the movie downplay to mention too much about the cruelty of slavery and how the racial discrimination, which was lowly presented (lets be serious 1939, lack of cultural understanding makes sense not many would dare to talk about it in the silver screen), was view by the free blacks and slaves of the south that had to endure for many years before the idea of freedom was accepted and before the civil rights movements, but yes it is there, not bad neither nice. One of the problems with the movie if that it focus on the lost of the glorious south but doesn't mention or fully explains the consequences of such life style, the price of slavery and plantation life and how it happened or how all the issue of slavery and anti-slavery began; it lacks explanation of slavery, the good and the bad sides of it (when you study history you notice this things) to fully educate the public, that the issue of slavery is a human issue and that the southerners and the northerners are guilty of it because they were too human and too ignorant of our modern views (they cannot be blamed but that is not justification for anyone), maybe is me but I love historical accuracy in movies. This movie is a good (but not the best) portrayal of the south's point of view, it will differs with the north's or with any ones but given the understandings of how the southerners view slavery, not because of arrogance or ignorance but because of the lack of cultural understanding and modern enlightenment. For anyone who wants to know more about slavery one should read "The Wages of Whiteness" by David R. Roediger to know why white southerners (and also northerners, no one is innocent) lacked common sense about slavery and the faults of their ancestors and first settlers, a deeper understanding of white identity and the disasters that followed by 'psychological wage', also there is a lack of understanding of the house servants and their important central role in plantation life which is not fully explained in the movie, their role are important that is why I recommend reading "Ar'n't I a Woman?" by Deborah Gray White and read the chapter about Mammies. I don't blame the south's slavery issue; one who studies the past must not blame but understand without pointing the finger; the issue of slavery was not the south's problem but also an issue of the north, it was a national issue which is not view or explain in the movie. I think is time to look hard and beyond the lines and words and find the issue of slavery was not a state or individual or social fault but a historical and cultural issue waiting to become a ugly issue in American history but there are also interesting things one can learn about slavery and the human will if is willing to open and carefully look. The movie is a good tool to understand the south's life style and what they were trying to protect, the Jeffersonian ideals of a agricultural economy and private property, but the explanation is only half backed, for those who want to learn more look at these books that I mentioned.
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on May 22, 2001
Gone With the Wind is remember as a great movie because of it's epic scope and excellent production values. But 60 years later when the big budget no longer thrills us, we are left with a decent film but nothing special.
To begin with the entire film is very campy and melodramatic. The whole film is very heavy-handed and over-done. Scenes like where Scarlet crys "I'll never be hungry again" are just plain ackward. Someone should have tatooed the word "subtlty" on Selznick's head.
The script is fairly weak too. It presents a very narrow, one dimensional view of the Civil War. Worse, the Civil War ends half way through the movie and the rest of the film lacks the first half's energy.
Another major flaw is that the characters lack any real depth. Scarlet is cold and nasty through the whole movie. She never changes untill the last two minutes of the movie. There is simply no development. Ashley is noble and his wife is so nice and sweat that it makes me sick. These characters simply aren't human and don't feal real. Probably the only character in the whole movie who actually developes at all is Ret. Sadly, Clark Gable's strong performance isn't enough to carry the rest of the cast.
It should also be noted that Gone With the Wind is very racist at some points. The scene where all the slaves are going off to fight the "evil yankees" is enough to turns one's stomache. Most of the black characters are portrayed as child-like and stupid. The only exception to this is Mimi who does an excellent job and deserved her Oscar.
Gone With the Wind is still an example of fine production values but when you strip away all the lavish sets and money spent on the film, you're left with a rather hollow experiance. While there is no denying that it is a very pretty movie, even today, and it does have it's moments, Gone With the Wind is simply an over-done and campy movie. This film does not deserve to be ranked up there with the likes of Citizen Kane or the Godfather. It's just not that good.
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on November 19, 2001
I agree with "Simply A Classic" review. Gone With the Wind does ignore the brutality of slavery and focuses on a romanticized view of slave life by "staying away from unnecessary words or insinuations." However, as "Simply" points out this movie was released in 1939, and at that time probably no movies addressed race and slavery realistically. Unfortunately, the romanticized view of slavery presented by GWTW influences our cultural memory of slavery and may negate the truth in, I believe, more realistic and culturally valuble narratives, like the Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass.
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on November 19, 2001
I agree with "Simply A Classic" review. Gone With the Wind does ignore the brutality of slavery and focuses on a romanticized view of slave life by "staying away from unnecessary words or insinuations." However, as "Simply" points out this movie was released in 1939, and at that time probably no movies addressed race and slavery realistically. Unfortunately, the romanticized view of slavery presented by GWTW influences our cultural memory of slavery and may negate the truth in, I believe, more realistic and culturally valuble narratives, like the Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass.
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on April 16, 2001
The first time I saw it, I hadn't read the book. I thought it was great. Then I read the book and rewatched the movie and saw that it didn't even begin to compare. PLEASE read the book; it's so much better. So much of the plot of the book is omitted in the movie (like, oh, say her children), though when you look at the length of the movie you say, "what?!!" For those of you who just can't understand Rhett's attraction to Scarlett in the movie, PLEASE read the book. It makes the story a whole lot less sappy.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on March 15, 2004
"Gone With The Wind" plays like an old friend with its cliches of southern pageantry, its noble dipiction of the slave and lurid burning of Atlanta. David O. Selznick's masterfully told civil war melodrama is based on Margaret Mitchell's best selling novel. Mitchell, it seems, only wrote the book to keep her mind nimble while recovering from a horse riding accident. She never intended that it should be published.
By now spoiled southern belle - Scarlett O'Hara - has become a lionized icon in the canons of American cinema. It seems odd that Vivien Leigh was not the obvious choice from the start but Selznick spent nearly two years of preproduction in a nation wide search for the greatest female lead in any motion picture, any time, anywhere. There really isn't much to say that hasn't already been said of this perennial classic. Perhaps the greatest kudos came from a film critic in the 1960s who claimed, "There have only been two motion pictures in the history of American film; Gone With The Wind and everything else!"
THE TRANSFER: This is a flipper disc minted from the 1996 general release print that hit theaters for the film's anniversary. The DVD's color palette seems subdued to say the least, with muddy colors that at times betray the richness and lush lurid feel of the original three strip Technicolor. Though fine details can be seen even during the darkest scenes, intermitten edge enhancement, shimmering of fine details and aliasing throughout both sides of this disc distract from the general viewing. The audio has been remixed to 5.1 and although dated (big surprise) exhibits a richness in music tracks not present in the original mono recording.
EXTRAS: NOT A SINGLE ONE!!! This is a disc screaming for a remastering effort with extras that MUST include Turner's "The Making of A Legend" documentary and at least one audio commentary track - plus a host of outtakes, test footage and theatrical trailers. So where are they? Probably in Warner's vaults. A shame! They belong here.
BOTTOM LINE: Rumor is that "Gone With The Wind" is getting a new gussied up high def' remaster and should resurface in a deluxe edition sometime this year. I can't think of a better reason to start giving a damn!
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on May 25, 2015
I was disappointed in the colour of the movie. It was not brilliant like the original and my vhs tape was better. With modern technology when a movie is converted to DVD I know there is the capability to improve the quality of an old movie. Why would I want to upgrade to the DVD if I didn't at least get the quality I had from a VHS.
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