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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Redford Treat
Fans will be reasonably happy with this bluray release of "Jeremiah Johnson" (1972) without going overboard. Despite the evident lack of any restoration, a visual improvement is noticeable over the DVD format with sharper resolution and generally superior colour.

The film is a good choice for upgrading to High Definition in terms of both setting and subject...
Published 13 months ago by Argus

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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Is this a children's movie?
This movie really threw me. By all appearances it should be an exciting film about getting back to nature, as well as an historical piece. Yet the dialogue, the acting, the directing, and the music all made it feel (to me at least) like a children's movie, something Disney would have made. But it isn't a children's movie, at least not one I'd ever show my children...
Published on Sept. 3 2002 by N. Tomlinson


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Redford Treat, Feb. 24 2013
By 
Argus - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Jeremiah Johnson [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
Fans will be reasonably happy with this bluray release of "Jeremiah Johnson" (1972) without going overboard. Despite the evident lack of any restoration, a visual improvement is noticeable over the DVD format with sharper resolution and generally superior colour.

The film is a good choice for upgrading to High Definition in terms of both setting and subject matter. Locations in Utah double for the Rockies in this tale of a nineteenth century mountain man (Robert Redford) struggling to survive in a punishing environment. Drawn into a world of towering peaks, desolate snowfields and pine forests, we follow the character from his rejection of urban society through a series of testing challenges to carve out a life in the wilderness. Watch for the irony of "civilization" reaching out when Johnson feels compelled to violate a Crow burial ground while guiding cavalry to rescue stranded settlers. The decision and its consequences are a pivotal moment.

As the film is partly a study in solitude some scenes contain minimal dialogue and these serve to underline a real strength of Redford's craft. It is that of being not so much an actor as a "reactor" in the way events and people are reflected on his face, perhaps best demonstrated here in the cabin episode where Johnson grieves while his horse moves restlessly outside.

Supporting actors, Will Geer as the wily old trapper Bear Claw and Stefan Gierasch playing Del Gue ("...with an E"), are a delight and it's almost worth watching the movie for them alone.

The project was a favorite of Redford's, one which became a labour of love for him and director Sydney Pollack who even mortgaged his home at one point to help finance it. They provide a commentary on the bluay edition along with writer John Milius.

Recommended.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Memories, Nov. 11 2013
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This DVD is something I will cherish for years to come. I could not find it anywhere. It was a film my dad and I shared when I was younger and it brings back fond memories when I watch it. Since my dad passed, it brings me comfort to watch and remember our times together. Thanks Amazon!!!
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5.0 out of 5 stars My favourite Redford movie, July 31 2013
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This review is from: Jeremiah Johnson [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
Robert Redford excels in title role of naïve young man 'gone native', back in the days of the mountain men. Redford is very authentic and obviously relishes his part. Simple story, with strong supporting performances from Will Geer and Stefan Gierasch who teach Jeremiah how to survive in the wilderness.
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5.0 out of 5 stars JERIMIAH JOHNSON, July 16 2013
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THIS IS UNDOUBTABLY THE FINEST CRAFT EVER DONE BY ROBERT REDFORD.
I THINK THIS PROBABLY LAUNCH HIS CAREER LIKE NO OTHER FILM, I ALSO ENJOYED THE CAMEO APPEARANCE BY WIL GEER
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5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent wilderness type entertainment, July 10 2013
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great mountain scenery, depicts a simpler time where men could just disappear for years or longer and never be heard of again,super acting and great casting!!
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5.0 out of 5 stars a favorite, Jan. 26 2013
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This is an old favorite,decided to buy it on dvd,already had the vhs.We'll never get tired of watching it. great in all aspects
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5.0 out of 5 stars excellent, Jan. 13 2013
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Great frontier movie with outstanding backdrops in Utah. Robert Redford and the other characters exhibited quality acting. The plot was also a favourite.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Absolutely Unforgettable Masterpiece From Sydney Pollack!, Jan. 5 2002
By 
derJUBster (Near the Beach, Heart of Dixie) - See all my reviews
Robert Redford and Sydney Pollack, the Academy Award-winning director of Out of Africa team up (the 2nd of their 6 films together) for this powerful saga of a man whose determined search for contentment leads to back-breaking, even mind-breaking hardship, and to constant battle with hostile native Americans. This absolutely unforgettable and spectacularly beautiful, yet haunting adventure film captures both the epic scale of an unconquered Nature and the small, frustrating, hard scrabbling struggles of a lone man desperately trying to start a fire during a gale-force blizzard, cross a meadow knee-deep in snow or catch something, anything, to eat.
Filmed entirely on location in winter-time Utah, this movie captures on film Jeremiah Johnson's (Robert Redford) attempt in the mid 1800s to become a mountain man, seeking solitude in a wilderness whose purity he never questioned. This film is sure to find its way into the private library of every connoisseur of superb movie making, and is one of those very rare films you can enjoy again and again! Masterpiece!
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4.0 out of 5 stars Robert Redford's personal favorite film role, June 15 2000
By 
Joe O'Brien (Virginia Beach, Virginia USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Jeremiah Johnson (VHS Tape)
I had the pleasure of seeing "Jeremiah Johnson" in the theatre soon after it first came out at Christmas 1972. On the big screen you could really appreciate the magnificent cinematography and the majestic scenery. It loses something when transferred to the small screen. So I recommend watching the letterboxed version on a larger screen TV(at least 27inches or larger.)It has fine direction by Sydney Pollack whom Robert Redford has worked with in more than a half dozen films. The movie takes place in Redford's own neck of the woods,the mountains of Utah.The late Will Geer,(the grandfather on the television series "The Walton's" back in the '70's),is very enjoyable as a bear trapping mountain man named Bear Claw. And,Delle Bolton is impressive in her movie debut as Jeremiah's young indian maiden bride named Swan. I don't believe I've seen Ms. Bolton in anything since this film.The film also has an atmospheric music score by John Rubinstein.
I haven't read the two books this movie is based on "Crow Killer" by Raymond W. Thorp and Robert Bunker and "Mountain Man" by Vardis Fisher and I hear the books are much more intense and graphic and if the screenplay had followed them more closely the film would have generated a more adult R rating instead of the family friendly PG rating that it has. Redford said in an interview back in the '80's that of all the films he has done that "Jeremiah Johnson" was his personal favorite.
I think that's really saying something considering all the fine films Mr. Redford has done.This is one of his best along with "Butch Cassidy and The Sundance Kid" from 1969, "The Sting",(the OscarTM winner for Best Picture of 1973),"The Great Waldo Pepper" from 1975,"Three Days of The Condor",(also directed by Sydney Pollack),"All The President's Men" from 1976,"Brubaker" from 1980, "Ordinary People"(which was his directorial debut and was the OscarTM winner for Best Picture of 1980 and he won Best Director honors),"The Natural" from 1984,"A River Runs Through It" from 1992,which Redford directed and was the narrator,"Quiz Show" nominated for Best Picture of 1994,(it didn't win), and "The Horse Whisperer" from 1998(which he both directed and starred in. Among Director Sydney Pollack's best are "The Way We Were" from 1973,"The Yakuza" from 1975,"Tootsie" from 1982 and "Out of Africa",the OscarTM winner for Best Picture of 1985,with Mr.Pollack winning Best Director honors). Robert Redford and Sydney Pollack are two of America's finest filmmakers.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "The day that you tarry is the day that you loose ...", July 2 2004
By 
Themis-Athena (from somewhere between California and Germany) - See all my reviews
He was a big man, maybe even growing in physical stature with the growth of his myth; deadly with his Bowie knife and his gun alike. He'd been a fighter in the U.S.-Mexican war, but left the lowland's ways behind in favor of a mountain man's: the lonesome hunt, the wild outdoors, and the confrontation with nature rather than his fellow men. And he came to be known as "Crow Killer" and "Liver Eating Johns(t)on" when he took war to the Crow nation after they killed his wife.
Based on Raymond Thorp/Robert Bunker's "Crow Killer" and Vardis Fisher's "Mountain Man" and scripted by John Milius and Edward Anhalt - with input from frequent Redford/Pollack cooperator David Rayfiel - Sydney Pollack's and Robert Redford's 1972 movie loosely traces the mythical hunter's legend, opening with his arrival at the fort where he buys his first horse and gun. "Ride due west as the sun sets. Turn left at the Rocky Mountains," is a trader's goodnatured answer to Johnson's naive inquiry where to find "bear, beaver and other critters worth cash money when skinned." All too soon, he finds that his lowland skills no longer do him any good. He almost starves in the freezing mountainous winter before being taken in by old "griz" hunter Bear Claw Chris Lapp (Will Geer in a stand-out role - his and Redford's deadpan exchanges alone make this movie worth its price).
Setting out on his own again the following year Johnson fares better, even gaining the respect of a Crow warrior prosaically named Paints His Shirt Red (Joaquin Martinez), the first person he encountered in the mountains. After assisting a settler's wife who had to watch her family massacred by Indians (Allyn Ann McLerie) and reluctantly agreeing to take charge of her son (Josh Albee) - a boy grown mute by the horrors he witnessed, whom he names Caleb - he comes across white hunter Del Gue (Stefan Gierasch), buried up to his head in sand by a band of Blackfeet. Revenging that act, Johnson unwittingly acquires a wife, in exchange for bestowing the Blackfeet's ponies and guns on Flathead chief Two-Tongues-Lebeaux (Richard Angarola): the chief's daughter Swan (Delle Bolton). Although neither embraces the match enthusiastically, over time Jeremiah and Swan learn to appreciate and, eventually, love each other. But then fate strikes: Against better judgment pressured into guiding a cavalry company through Crow burial ground, Johnson finds Swan and Caleb murdered upon his return. He sets out after the Crow who invaded his home ... and plants the seeds of his myth.
"Jeremiah Johnson" was Redford's and Pollack's second of seven collaborations after 1966's "This Property is Condemned." What most obviously characterizes this movie is the breathtaking manner in which its cinematography uses Utah's mountains (doubling for the story's actual Montana setting): despite studio budgetary limits shot entirely on location, the film had Redford acting as a virtual tour guide to the magnificent Wasatch, which he had recently made his home himself.
Moreover, the movie shows enormous restraint, particularly given its violent underlying story. There's no blood-gushing "Braveheart"-style, no dramatic score; fights are mostly one-on-one, occurring as they would in real life - silently, with only the opponents' grunts being heard - and despite his fearsome epithet we never actually see Johnson eat a dead Crow warrior's liver. (Reportedly a script change on which Redford insisted: wisely so.) Similarly, Johnson's and Swan's relationship builds on small symbolic gestures, moving from his coarse attempts to teach her English and refusal to learn her language to conversations in Salish (Flathead); and from her submissive expectation of his exercising his marital rights on their wedding night (which rather repulses him) to later-exchanged tender glances and smiles: Thus, we only learn about their marriage's belated consummation when one morning Swan points to his beard in response to his question about her reddish cheeks. - Further, there's no dramatic conclusion; no final battle: as Johnson's myth begins to grow and he withdraws deeper and deeper into the mountains, he retraces his steps and meets in reverse order the people he encountered after his arrival: Del Gue, the settler now living in Caleb's mother's cabin, Bear Claw Chris Lapp; and finally Paints His Shirt Red who, although a Crow, created a monument in Johnson's honor and sends him off with a last salute, which Johnson reciprocates; ending the movie in an immortalizing freeze-frame shot - again, a feature insisted on by Redford, doubtlessly in reminiscence of "Butch and Sundance" (and repeated one way or another in several subsequent movies).
Despite its languid pace and although just under two hours long, "Jeremiah Johnson" formally takes an epic approach, complete with overture, entr'acte and narrator (uncredited, but I think Willie Nelson), whose subtle voiceovers and brief songs provide key narrative bridges. While the latter match the movie's overall style and the overture at least corresponds with Johnson's mythical stature - albeit also setting up ultimately unfulfilled expectations of a dramatic finale - adding an entr'acte may have been a bit much, particularly in the middle of the ride through the Crow burial ground (incidentally a screenplay addition designed to give the Indians a reason to punish Johnson and not make them appear as mindless killers). In my view this breaks the dramatic tension rather than enhancing it; problematic insofar as virtually all that remains thereafter is Johnson's gradual withdrawal into the mountains and fights with the Crow. But no matter. This is a terrific movie, featuring great banter with Johnson's fellow hunters as well as some wonderfully delicate scenes with Swan, showcasing some of North America's most dramatically beautiful scenery, and growing on you more and more the more often you watch it.
And some say he's up there still ...
"The way that you wander is the way that you choose. The day that you tarry is the day that you lose. Sunshine or thunder, a man will always wonder where the fair wind blows ..."
(Lyrics, Jeremiah Johnson's theme.)
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