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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Who Framed Roger Rabbit? [1988] [25th Anniversary] [Blu-ray] [UK Release]
Who Framed Roger Rabbit? [1988] [25th Anniversary] [Blu-ray] [UK Release] On Blu-ray for the first time ever, this digitally re-mastered edition of ‘Who Framed Roger Rabbit?’ practically jumps off the screen with its brilliant picture, rich sound — and dangerous curves.

Its 1947 Hollywood and Eddie Valiant [Bob Hoskins], a down-on-his-luck...
Published 2 months ago by Andrew C. Miller

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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Good blu-ray, faulty dvd
Nothing bad to say about the Blu-ray, but the DVD version is not as advertised. 1:33 and it ask for a disk 2 for some bonus who aren't here (this detail wouldn't bothered me if it wasn't advertised).

I bough it for the blu-ray but i expected a remastered movie on the dvd as well, not a recycled disk from the second dvd edition. If you already have the second...
Published 19 months ago by Fenneck?


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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Good blu-ray, faulty dvd, March 14 2013
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This review is from: Who Framed Roger Rabbit: 25th Anniversary Edition Blu-ray Combo (Blu-ray + DVD) (Blu-ray)
Nothing bad to say about the Blu-ray, but the DVD version is not as advertised. 1:33 and it ask for a disk 2 for some bonus who aren't here (this detail wouldn't bothered me if it wasn't advertised).

I bough it for the blu-ray but i expected a remastered movie on the dvd as well, not a recycled disk from the second dvd edition. If you already have the second edition dvd, pass this one, nothing new, nothing better, nothing more.
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23 of 27 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars FILM STILL CUT!! STAY AWAY!!, April 2 2003
By 
This review is from: Who Framed Roger Rabbit (DVD)
What the heck is wrong with Disney?!?!? The ONLY version worth buying is the Original VHS release... TRUST ME. Back a couple years when the first DVD release was made, it was quickly discovered to be CUT and ALTERED for younger audiences. First, in the scene early in the film where Baby Herman throws a fit on the movie set. In the original version, he walks under a woman's legs and sticks his arm up her dress and says "Excuse me Toots!". On that DVD, Baby Herman's arm was re-drawn so it just stays by his side! Another scene is when Valiant first meets Jessica Rabbit. When he first enters the Toon Strip Club, we can see that Betty Boob is onstage with her shirt off and she's shaking her b%%b$ (don't get excited, her back is to the camera). This scene is completely CUT from the DVD. Later in the film when Jessica Rabbit and Valiant are riding on the car in Toontown... the car screeches out of control and crashes, throwing Valiant and Jessica onto the streets. For a second or two in the original version, it was VERY obvious that Jessica had NO underwear on and the dress was very wide-legged. In that first DVD, they added white underwear. NOW WE HAVE THIS VISTA SERIES DVD!! The version that they tote on TV as the "Definitive version"... AHH, yeah right. They HAVE gone back and fixed Baby Herman's arm. Now his arm reaches back up the dress. THANK YOU. But the scene of Betty Boob is still cut!! Not only that, but the scene with Jessica being thrown from the car has been RE-DRAWN!! Now her dress has been extended so that it is now pulled down revealing nothing!! These scenes may sound like "No big deal" to the average viewer, but what of us who love WHO FRAMED ROGER RABBIT? What of us who want the film we remember seeing?? Altering this film is just as offensive as what Lucas has done to STAR WARS!! Take my advice and STEER THOUSANDS OF MILES AWAY from this trite. If we all demand that we want ROGER RABBIT the way it WAS, and refuse to buy this new "Kid-Friendly" version... maybe Disney will take notice. Maybe...
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Who Framed Roger Rabbit? [1988] [25th Anniversary] [Blu-ray] [UK Release], Aug. 8 2014
By 
Andrew C. Miller - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
Who Framed Roger Rabbit? [1988] [25th Anniversary] [Blu-ray] [UK Release] On Blu-ray for the first time ever, this digitally re-mastered edition of ‘Who Framed Roger Rabbit?’ practically jumps off the screen with its brilliant picture, rich sound — and dangerous curves.

Its 1947 Hollywood and Eddie Valiant [Bob Hoskins], a down-on-his-luck detective is hired to find proof that Marvin Acme, gag factory mogul and owner of Toontown, is playing hanky-panky with femme fatale Jessica Rabbit, wife of Maroon Cartoon superstar, Roger Rabbit. When Acme is found murdered all fingers point to Roger, who begs the Toon-hating Valiant to find the real evildoer. Complete with hours of bonus features — including three digitally restored Roger Rabbit Shorts, this multi Oscar® winner (Best Film Editing, Best Sound Effects Editing, Best Visual Effects, Special Achievement In Animation Direction; 1988) is pure magic in hi-definition Blu-ray.

Cast: Bob Hoskins, Kathleen Turner, Christopher Lloyd, Joanna Cassidy, Charles Fleischer, Stubby Kaye, Alan Tilvern, Richard LeParmentier, Lou Hirsch, Betsy Brantley, Joel Silver, Paul Springer, Richard Ridings, Edwin Craig, Lindsay Holiday, Mike Edmonds, Morgan Deare, Laura Frances, Mae Questel, Mel Blanc, Tony Anselmo, Mary T. Radford, Joe Alaskey, Richard Williams, Wayne Allwine, Tony Pope, Peter Westy, Cherry Davis, Frank Welker and Frank Sinatra (voice) (archive sound)

Director: Robert Zemeckis

Producers: Frank Marshall and Robert Watts

Screenplay: Jeffrey Price and Peter S. Seaman

Composer: Alan Silvestri

Cinematography: Dean Cundey

Resolution: 1080p

Aspect Ratio 1.85:1

Audio: English: 5.1 DTS-HD Master Audio, French: 5.1 DTS-HD High Resolutions, Italian: 5.1 Dolby Digital, German: 5.1 Dolby Digital and Spanish: 5.1 Dolby Digital

Subtitles: English, English SDH, French, Italian, German, Spanish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Suomi and Nederland

Running Time: 103 minutes

Region: All Regions

Number of discs: 1

Studio: Touchstone Entertainment

Andrew’s Bu-ray Review – 'Who Framed Roger Rabbit?' has aged remarkably well. 25 years after its release, in a time when mixing live-action with CGI creations is commonplace, 'Roger Rabbit' is still relevant. The way the live-action characters – Bob Hoskins specifically – interact with the animated characters is just as believable as modern day movies that are working with exponentially more technology than Robert Zemeckis had in 1988.

It wasn't the first time that animation and live-action were mixed, but it was the best. Robert Zemeckis recently gave an interview, in which he discussed how they were able to create the illusion so effectively. One aspect that he mentions is the fact that the camera actually moves around the animated characters, with the living actors still in frame. This was an extremely difficult job since up until then animations had simply been placed flat on the frame with the actors trying to act like they were really there. The technical wizardry applied here still astounds me. However, its technical savvy isn't the only reason to admire 'Roger Rabbit,' it's pretty damn funny too.

The world Robert Zemeckis developed here is one of the most immersive movie settings I've ever experienced. He creates a living breathing world in which humans and cartoons share the same space. Nothing ever feels forced or out of place. Instead, the entire experience is so completely integrated that you believe it implicitly. There's no need for strenuous, overdrawn exposition about why the Toons exist along with humans. All you need to know is that they do.

Roger Rabbit [voiced by Charles Fleischer] is the most famous Toon in Toontown. He was born… I mean drawn, to make people laugh. Sadly, he's fallen on hard times. His smokin' hot wife Jessica Rabbit [voiced by Kathleen Turner] may be cheating on him, and to top it all off, somebody has framed him for murder. Thrown into the mix is lonely private eye Eddie Valiant [Bob Hoskins]. Eddie hates Toons, "A Toon killed my brother," he sneers. But, Eddie also loves money, so he takes a job spying on Roger Rabbit's wife to see if she's up to no good.

What makes 'Roger Rabbit' so successful, other than the deftly executed technicalities of it all is the fact that the movie is wholly self-aware. It understands why Toons are funny and plays with the clichés. You get a sense of that awareness at the very beginning when Roger Rabbit, acting in an animated short, is unable to conjure up floating stars after being smashed by a fridge. Instead, tiny birds pop up and start flying around his noggin. "Stars, Roger! Stars!" the director yells. The movie is replete with this type of scene, moments that embrace the wackiness of a bygone era, when animated shorts involved little more than an anvil being dropped on someone's head.

'Roger Rabbit' is refreshingly adult. It doesn't shy away from cartoons cursing. It's also strange to see Mickey Mouse inhabiting the same screen as Baby Herman, but it happens here. Not to mention the fact that this is one of the only places you'll be able to see a brightly coloured clash of the imaginations of Walt Disney and Chuck Jones. Watching a Donald Duck and Daffy Duck duelling piano show is one of the many delights of the film. 'Who Framed Roger Rabbit?' is a true classic in terms of technical prowess and storytelling. Hoskins work here is more believable than many modern day actors can pull off with CGI helping them out. This is still, arguably, Robert Zemeckis' most inventive. Finally having it on Blu-ray is a treat.

Blu-ray Video Quality – 'Who Framed Roger Rabbit?' comes to Blu-ray with a 1080p presentation. You'll notice inconsistent blacks, wavering grain structures, flickering animation, and a line of other oddities as the film progresses. What you won't notice is any sign of extreme age or wear and tear. A lot of love has gone into bringing this movie to Blu-ray, yet the source material holds it back from becoming perfect. The good news is that most of the movie looks great. Whenever the stage is lit well the live-action and animation both shine. Detail is rich, giving us uninterrupted views of Bob Hoskins' inhuman amount of shoulder hair. Each hair is well-defined, as are the textures of Eddie's stereotypical private eye getup. I've never seen Jessica Rabbit's dress look so clear and gorgeously rendered. The moment she walks out on stage is a wow moment. Not just because of her well-endowed features, but because this is where you can tell the finer resolution is really giving this movie more visual oomph than it's ever had.

Blu-ray Video Quality – The Touchstone Entertainment 5.1 DTS-HD Master Audio mix also features some troubling aspects that cropped up as a result of the tricky way in which the film was filmed. You'll most likely notice quite a few scenes, particularly the first time Eddie and Roger visit the bar, where some instances when inconsistent and muffled voices stick out like a sore thumb. In that scene, a few voices sound otherworldly, and a few instances remain where sound doesn't sync up to moving lips.

Alan Silvestri's memorable score (which not so coincidentally has a ton in common with the score to 'Back to the Future') holds up very well here. His rousing strings and booming drums are given ample room to spread out and keep the movie tense. Rear channels are filled with ambient sound. The busy streets of Los Angeles feature cars driving by in the background and people milling about, whereas the zany streets of Toontown are an all-out riot in the rear channels. It really adds to the overall enjoyment of the movie. It's like you're being surrounded by Toons. Aside from a few dialogue missteps here and there, most of it comes across as being clearly intelligible. Cartoon-inspired sound effects have a decent depth to them and is deep and well-resolved. I found the Touchstone Entertainment audio mix to be a playful, immersive experience.

Blu-ray Special features and extras:

Watch the Movie with Filmmakers’ Audio Commentary: Director Robert Zemeckis, producer Frank Marshall, associate producer Steve Starkey, visual effects supervisor Ken Ralston and co-writers Jeffrey Price and Peter S. Seaman methodically inch their way through the film, discussing the genesis of the project, developing and writing the story and script, the creation of the animated characters (the design, animation and voice work), Steven Speilberg's personal wrangling of multiple studios and licensing departments, the innovative techniques used to blend Roger Rabbit's animation and live-action footage more seamlessly than had been seen on screen before, and everything from the film's casting to its editing, music and reception.

The Roger Rabbit Shorts [Digitally Restored] [25:00] Three Maroon Cartoons from Roger's past and includes Tummy Trouble, Roller Coaster Rabbit and Trail Mix-Up. Digitally restored and presented in high definition with Dolby Digital 5.1 surround.

Who Made Roger Rabbit [11.00] Mini-documentary hosted by Charles Fleischer, the voice of Roger Rabbit. Hosts this brief behind-the-scenes documentary, which, like most every other special feature on the disc, has been ported over from the previously released DVD edition of the film. Special guest appearance by the Roger Rabbit himself.

Deleted Scene: The Pig Head Sequence [6.00] “The Pig Head Sequence” with an introduction by the filmmakers.

Before and After [3.00] Split screen comparison with and without animation. Compare raw production footage with final live-action/animation shots.

Toons Stand-Ins Documentary [3.00] Rehearsing with stand-ins for the Toons. This is a short documentary explaining the rubber models and the people they used to stand in for the animation that would be added in later.

Behind The Ears: The True Story of Roger Rabbit [37.00] An exclusive, in-depth, behind-the-scene documentary. An extensive, far more worthwhile documentary, complete with revealing on-set footage and dailies, countless interviews with key members of the cast and crew, and a thoroughly candid overview of the production.

On Set! – Benny the Cab [5.00] The making of a scene from the film with: Director Robert Zemeckis and company go about their business as cameras capture their process.

Finally, There are so many reasons to love 'Who Framed Roger Rabbit?' It's an innovative idea that was taken to a whole new level by Robert Zemeckis and his crew. He truly had a vision of what the movie could be like if done right and they succeeded by any measure. Not only is the technical side of the movie impressive, but the entire world created here is completely overpowering. It sucks you into a strange alternate reality where cartoons inhabit the same world as people. Disney has done an admirable job restoring the movie for HD treatment. The video has a few problems here and there, but should, on the whole, make fans happy. The audio mix sounds great though, barring a few minor glitches. 'Who Framed Roger Rabbit?' is highly recommended and ever since I viewed this at the cinema and on an inferior Region 1 DVD I have loved the film, as it was at the time so ahead of its time in combining Actors and Cartoon Characters with Disney and the MGM Musicals, which has been always successful, but with today’s computer technology the process of putting Actors with Cartoon Characters is so much easier, whereas when this film was made, the logistics were so much of a headache. But despite this, this is a fantastic beautiful Blu-ray and it has now gone pride of place in my ever increasing Steven Spielberg Blu-ray Collection. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED!

Andrew C. Miller – Your Ultimate No.1 Film Fan
Le Cinema Paradiso
WARE, United Kingdom
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5.0 out of 5 stars Tonsa 'toon fun!, June 26 2004
By 
This review is from: Who Framed Roger Rabbit (DVD)
I was 10 when "Who Framed Roger Rabbit?" came out and it is just as much fun to watch now, maybe funnier because I missed some of the humor back then. Roger's a riot and his wife, Jessica Rabbit ("I'm not bad, I'm just drawn that way"), is truly a toon vixen. Bob Hoskin's Eddie Valiant is sent to find out the truth when the owner of Toon Town is murdered after playing patty-cake (literally) with Jessica. Everyone assumes a jealous Roger did it and that washed-up detective Eddie can't hack it anymore. There is lots of subtle humor, like when Eddie asks for a scotch on the rocks in a 'toon bar and instead of ice he gets actual rocks. Eddie seriously hates Toon Town because his brother had a piano dropped on his head, but he eventually becomes pals with Roger, overcomes his hatred of Toon Town and clears Roger's name. Christopher Lloyd's Judge Doom is perfectly creepy and his squad of weasels are funny as they try to stop Eddie and Roger from discovering the truth.

The interaction between the live actors and the toons is seamless, probably why the movie won four Oscars. The behind the scenes features and commentaries are great, the entire 2-disc set is incredibly well-thought out and packaged, making it a must-have for the fan.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A worthy dvd for one of the greatest movies ever., June 19 2004
By 
J. Hayes (AL, United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Who Framed Roger Rabbit (DVD)
When Roger Rabbitt came out, I was probably too young to ever know what it was. I am sure I saw it many times as a kid, but never saw it as the genius piece of filmmaking that it is. This movie is brilliant in every way, and with the release of the Vista Series DVD I have been reacquainted with it. I am 20 years old now and this is one of my top 5 favorite movies. That is the great thing about this movie, that all ages can enjoy something that this has to offer whether it be the animation sequences or just the fun storyline. I love both.
Here is the story. Someone has killed Marvin Acme, owner of ToonTown and Roger takes the heat for it. Of course he was framed but by who and why? Roger seeks the help of Eddie Valiant, a once prominant detective that fell into hard times after his brother was killed by a toon. Thus was his reluctance to help Roger since he was a toon. But he does help Roger, and he must get to the bottom of the mystery before Judge Doom finds and kills Roger by "dipping him". Eddie feels sorry for the rabbit so he investigates before it is too late, and along the way he discovers more and more about why Acme was killed and that ToonTown itself is in danger. Oh yeah, and Roger was the perfect one to frame because his wife Jessica Rabbit had been seen meeting with Acme before he died. So most people probably know the plot already, but if not it is highly original and entertaining.
This masterpiece couldn't get any better treatment than this, a fully loaded 2 disc set sporting both a family-friendly version on disc 1 and enthusiast version on disc 2. There are so many extras that it will take you a long time to see everything. I admittedly have just begun to see the treasures contained within. But it is obvious that the utmost care was taken to give this the fair dvd treatment it deserved--mission accomplished. This is probably my third favorite movie of all-time, and is without a doubt the best mix of live action and animation. So many great characters appear in this movie such as Bugs and Daffy in the scene where Eddie is falling and they hand him an anvil instead of a 'chute. It is sheer movie magic, and something I could watch all the time and never get tired of seeing it. Director Zimeckis has done a remarkable job with this film, and we also great great performances from Bob Hoskins (Eddie Valiant), Christopher Lloyd (Judge doom) and pretty much everyone else appearing in the film with the addition of the voices of Roger and Jessica who were terrific. To me this is a perfect movie so if you havent seen it before rent it, and if you like it then buy it. If you are a fan then you must own this dvd. It is truly a great thing and this dvd set presents it in all of its glory, the way it should be done.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Story of a Man, a Woman, and a Rabbit, April 29 2004
By 
Michael R Gates (Nampa, ID United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Who Framed Roger Rabbit (DVD)
More than 15 years after its initial theatrical release, in this era when computer-generated animation and CG special FX are the mandatory norm, 1988's WHO FRAMED ROGER RABBIT still stands firm as a groundbreaking, awe-inspiring, and wonderfully entertaining cinematic tour de force. In technical terms, it is the first film to convincingly combine living actors and animated cartoon characters in the same frame and make it look convincing. Thematically, it is a spoof of the noir films of the 1940s and 1950s, a slapstick comedy, and a satire of pre-civil-rights racial relations all rolled into one, sometimes referred to as the first genuine "cartoon noir."
Based on the novel WHO CENSORED ROGER RABBIT? by Gary K. Wolf, the script by Jeffrey Price & Peter S. Seaman appropriately replaces Wolf's comic-book and newspaper-strip cartoons with more cinematic animated cartoon characters, but it retains the novel's satiric sociological subtext. The film is set in an alternate-universe Hollywood of the 1940s where cartoon characters (colloquially referred to as "toons") live and breathe and interact with flesh-and-blood humans. The toons are the social minority, and as with the minorities of the real-world U.S.A. during the early 20th century, they are given employment only as menial service workers or as entertainers, and for housing they are relegated to a Harlem-like ghetto (known in the film as Toontown).
The story itself follows hard-boiled gumshoe Eddie Valiant (Bob Hoskins) as he tries to uncover evidence that will exonerate zany toon Roger Rabbit (voiced by Charles Fleischer) of a murder rap. Roger became the #1 suspect in the recent murder of Marvin Acme after it was discovered that the famous and wealthy gag-prop mogul had been rendezvousing secretly with Roger's sexy wife, Jessica Rabbit (voiced by an uncredited Kathleen Turner), and playing patty-cake with her. Though Valiant once vowed never to work for a toon again after one murdered his brother, the cynical ol' sleuth turns out to be a bit sentimental and, feeling sorry for the funny bunny, takes Roger's case anyway. But as the gushy gumshoe snoops for clues, he learns that there is more to Acme's murder than just a ploy to frame Roger; he uncovers a conspiracy that could lead to the demise of Toontown and its inhabitants!
Alternately hilarious and suspenseful, WHO FRAMED ROGER RABBIT is replete with the kinds of throwaway gags, inside jokes, and one-liners that audiences would expect to see in an old-time cartoon short, while at the same time it unfolds into an intelligent who-done-it mystery worthy of Bogart's Sam Spade. WHO FRAMED ROGER RABBIT represents the apex of 20th century filmmaking, but it is also wholesome family entertainment that offers something for kiddos and adults alike. This one will still be enjoyed by audiences of all ages long after it becomes an icon in the history books.
As mentioned before, WHO FRAMED ROGER RABBIT offers the most convincing mix of live-action performers and hand-drawn animation ever put to celluloid. While this is certainly due in part to the awesome skill and artistry with which the animators have inserted the cartoon characters, excellent performances from the "live" cast members--particularly Hoskins and Christopher Lloyd--also help to sell the illusion of realism. Instead of cartoonishly overacting, overREacting, or pushing their performances too far over the top, the actors adopt a natural, matter-of-fact posture towards the cartoons, and this makes the audience believe that the human characters interact with animated critters on a daily basis.
The two-disc "Vista Series" DVD set from Disney Home Video is the definitive home-theater edition of the wonderful film. Not only does it offer a pristine restored & remastered anamorphic widescreen transfer of WHO FRAMED ROGER RABBIT (by the way, there's also a pan-and-scan version), there are tons of interesting and fun bonus features. These include a really entertaining feature commentary with director Zemeckis, the screenwriters, and other crew members; a making-of featurette; three Roger Rabbit cartoon shorts that played in theaters before OTHER films (just like in the old days, folks); a deleted scene; and lots more!
The DVD collection of any serious film enthusiast will certainly contain a copy of this "cartoon noir" fantasy. This is a must-own DVD of a must-own film!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Revenge of the morally outraged - censorship in Toontown, April 2 2004
This review is from: Who Framed Roger Rabbit (DVD)
Remember the buzz a few years back when the CAV laserdisc version of this movie came out and it was possible to closely examine Jessica Rabbit's unexpected exit from Benny the Cab when he crashed into the lamppost. Some claimed she wasn't wearing anything underneath that skirt (makes you wonder about some folks since we're talking about a cartoon character here). Anyway, the initial DVD release of this movie showed the same scene just as the CAV laserdisc did. However, the Vista Series DVD alters the scene slightly so that Jessica's hand runs interference - no naughty bits to guess at here, just good, clean family entertainment. Makes you wonder about a whole different set of folks - just where were they at when Janet Jackson needed 'em. Nevertheless, both DVD movie versions are great fun and the film itself was a wonderful salute to the greatest animation comedy shorts (i.e. cartoons) to have ever been conceived - and I'm talking about those from various studios of the late 40s and the 1950s.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Revenge of the morally outraged - censorship strikes again, April 2 2004
This review is from: Who Framed Roger Rabbit (DVD)
Remember the buzz a few years back when the CAV laserdisc version of this movie came out and it was possible to closely examine Jessica Rabbit's unexpected exit from Benny the Cab when he crashed into the lamppost. Some claimed she wasn't wearing anything underneath that skirt (makes you wonder about some folks since we're talking about a cartoon character here). Anyway, the initial DVD release of this movie showed the same scene just as the CAV laserdisc did. However, the Vista Series DVD alters the scene slightly so that Jessica's hand runs interference - no naughty bits to guess at here, just good, clean family entertainment. Makes you wonder about a whole different set of folks - just where were they at when Janet Jackson needed 'em. Nevertheless, both DVD movie versions are great fun and the film itself was a wonderful salute to the greatest animation comedy shorts (i.e. cartoons) to have ever been conceived - and I'm talking about those from various studios of the late 40s and the 1950s.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Who Framed Roger Rabbit (Vista Series), Dec 5 2003
By 
H. Row "in1ear" (Arvada, CO United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Who Framed Roger Rabbit (DVD)
It's good to see how well this "antiquated" movie translated to dvd! Compared to the newer high tech movies Roger Rabbit still stands up and entertains with beautiful picture and sound. There are numerous extras that make you feel like you've entered the action including:
Who Made Roger Rabbit - a mini- documentary hosted by by Charles Fleisher the voice of Roger
The "Trouble in Toontown" Game
Audio Commentary with the filmakers
"Toontown Confidential" an intriquing & hilarious facts and trivia viewing option
And so many more options!
The movie is rated PG for some "Human" cussing. If you're disappointed about the toon Jessica Rabbit's bare breast scene being edited out, you should get a life and protest more important things going on in the world.
The Vista Series Edition of Roger Rabbit was a delight and I'm happy with this purchase. My five year old realizes that the few swear words are inappropriate and the "fantasy violence" to be politically correct isn't real and isn't the correct way to act.. Overall I think RR was a top notch movie and was meant for DVD.
JOHN ROW
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5.0 out of 5 stars "Thanks! I needed that!", July 27 2003
By 
W. Langan "take403" (the end of the world to your town!) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Who Framed Roger Rabbit (DVD)
This DVD set is sure to please anyone who enjoyed the ambitious, innovative and hilarious movie Who Framed Roger Rabbit. In 1988, Roger Rabbit earned several Oscars, combined animation with live action, made British actor Bob Hoskins a star and featured cameos from dozens of Disney, Warner Bros, MGM and Universal cartoon stars. Director Robert Zemeckis would also direct the Back to the Future series.
The story takes place in 1947 and it all begins with the lovable goofball Roger Rabbit (voiced by Charles Fleischer) co-starring with the cute but not-so-innocent Baby Herman (offstage, Herman is a whiney, scowling cigar smoking midget) in What's Cookin'. It's not long before Roger is under investigation by hapless no-nonsense detective Eddie Valiant (Hoskins). Marvin Acme (Stubby Kaye), owner of Toontown, has been murdered. Judge Doom (Back to the Future and Taxi's Christopher Lloyd) and his pack of scheming weasels suspect Roger is the culprit, particularly after Acme plays a game of patty-cake with Roger's sultry wife, Jessica (Kathleen Turner). Jessica's defense: "I'm not bad, I'm just drawn that way!" Roger, Jessica and Valiant do their best to prove Roger's innocence and save the fate of Toontown. Benny the wisecrackin' Cab is there to help Valiant get to the bottom of it all. Cameos include Daffy and Donald Duck, Bugs Bunny (voiced by the late Mel Blanc), Yosemite Sam, Mickey Mouse, Tweety, Droopy Dog, Betty Boop (with the original voice of Mae Questel) and many others. The musical score is composed by Alan Silvestri (Forrest Gump, Lilo and Stitch).
Now for the extras. There is a spoken commentary as well as a "pop-up video" style commentary on the picture, outtakes including the "pig head" sequence, information on before/after animation, a DVD game Trouble in Toontown, options of widescreen and fullscreen, and (if you're bi-lingual) dubbed in versions in French and Spanish.
Finally, it includes 3 Roger Rabbit short films, including Tummy Trouble (where Baby Herman swallows everything), Rollercoaster Rabbit (where Roger babysits Herman in an amusement park; my favourite of the 3) and Trail Mix-Up (where Roger takes Herman camping around Yellowstone Park; watch for Jessica's cameos in all of these!).
Give yourself a week or 2 to enjoy the movie and all the extras! Enjoy the ride and leave the driving to Benny, your faithful tourgide!
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