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89 of 101 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars There WILL be an extended edition of this movie!
I want to keep this brief...

I saw the movie with my wife, we both liked it, and like many others we did think it went a little on the long side.

That being said, you should be aware before ordering this movie that there is an extended version of the movie planned for release in late 2013 on time to promote the theatrical release of the 2nd Hobbit...
Published 17 months ago by Kevin Deluca

versus
15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Longer cut, less pacing.
When The Lord of the Rings extended editions came out, the added minutes were most welcome. Besides, Tolkien wrote the books with these details in mind. And that's the problem with The Hobbit: Most of the details are merely glimpsed at. It was Jackson and company who ultimately decided on the dialogs (when none was available), gave character designs and such. The main...
Published 8 months ago by Simon Bergeron


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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Longer cut, less pacing., Nov. 29 2013
By 
Simon Bergeron - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
When The Lord of the Rings extended editions came out, the added minutes were most welcome. Besides, Tolkien wrote the books with these details in mind. And that's the problem with The Hobbit: Most of the details are merely glimpsed at. It was Jackson and company who ultimately decided on the dialogs (when none was available), gave character designs and such. The main problem is that it makes The Hobbit feel like a rehash of The Lord of the Rings (Fellowship) on many occasions, but with far less charm than what was intended. Peter Jackson's direction seems to be on automatic pilot and it does feel like Guillermo Del Toro would have been a better choice of a director.

It's nevertheless fun to be back to Middle-Earth and enjoy seeing a younger Bilbo Baggins and seeing such fresh new designs on dwarves when Gimli seemed to have firmly established the look and talk. Special effects are aplenty here so eye candy is there at all turns. But the main feast remains (to me at least) the "Riddles in the Dark" section where Bilbo meets Gollum, whose antics and reactions are as simple, complex, enjoyable and hateful at the same time. Another great painstaking work has been done to put much plot devices to hint at things to come in Lord of the Rings, and so characters and dialogs that didn't happen in the original novel are here to convey it all. Christopher Lee (92 years of age at time of writing this) is still giving his all to the portrayal of Saruman.

As this is a Peter Jackson special edition, much has been given to the buyer. Over 9 hours of un-rehashed special features await and no one is coy about what happened when Del Toro decided to quit, how long it took, the struggles during production. You could hardly wish for a better set, if not to put it next to your theatrical release which contains 150 more minutes of features to make it a complete set.

As usual, audio and image quality is above and beyond reproach in any way shape or form. We ARE in Middle-Earth and Howard Shore's majestic compositions lead the way while the actors' costumes and expressions are faithfully rendered.

Be that as it may, as negative as I may have sounded in the beginning, there is nevertheless much to enjoy in the Hobbit. Casual fans may proceed with cautions, but completists and Tolkien fans alike should definitely give this one a closer look.
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89 of 101 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars There WILL be an extended edition of this movie!, Feb. 8 2013
By 
Kevin Deluca "KDakota630" (London, ON) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
I want to keep this brief...

I saw the movie with my wife, we both liked it, and like many others we did think it went a little on the long side.

That being said, you should be aware before ordering this movie that there is an extended version of the movie planned for release in late 2013 on time to promote the theatrical release of the 2nd Hobbit movie.

Will an extended version of a movie many thought was too long be an improvement? I don't have an answer to that question, but I personally plan to hold out and wait for the extended edition to see for myself.

Update, August 3, 2013: The extended version is now available for pre-order!
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey (Extended Edition)(blu ray): top notched video and audio; story is a little bloated!, Nov. 22 2013
By 
Dr. Joseph Lee (Toronto, Canada) - See all my reviews
(TOP 10 REVIEWER)    (#1 HALL OF FAME)    (REAL NAME)   
VIDEO (2D):

This Extended Edition of The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey finally arrives on blu ray with MPEG-4 AVC 1080p 2.40:1 encode. Filmed entirely on a Red Epic camera system, this transfer is pristine and images are razor-sharp, like every leaf in treetops, every blade of grass and every pebble on the road with resounding clarity. The costumes of each character shows every thread and stitching with extraordinary definition, and individual hairs in the beards are very distinct. Close-ups reveal pores, wrinkles and negligible blemishes with lifelike textures. This transfer also displays a dazzlingly bold and colourful palette, even if the cinematography seems to favour the teal & orange aesthetic. Primaries are richly saturated and animated while a healthy assortment of secondary hues fills the screen with warmth and energy. A crisp, brilliant contrast allows for extraordinary visibility in the distance, exposing the tiniest objects in the background and the fine lines of various rock formations scattered throughout the New Zealand landscape. Black levels are true and inky, penetrating deep into the screen with luxurious gradations, while shadow details remain plain and sharply delineated. (5/5)

AUDIO:

Peter Jackson's return to Middle-earth comes with a DTS-HD 7.1 Master Audio soundtrack. This lossless mix is reference quality with a mid-range that is amazingly extensive and broad, exhibiting the smallest detail with superb, crystal-clear clarity. The tiny pops and sizzles of crackling fire are perfectly audible, and distant, individual droplets of water while in Gollum's cave crash unto rocks with accurate, realistic definition. In action sequences, the upper ranges are precise and distinct, giving each roaring yell and clash of metal upon metal extraordinary intelligibility. Along with the excellent dynamic range, the bass provides an appreciable role in Howard Shore's thrilling musical score, adding a great deal of depth and weight to the orchestration, especially when hearing the cellos and the low-pitched brass instruments. Meanwhile, dialogue remains lucid and well-prioritized in the center. (5/5)

CONTENT:

Like the Lord of the Ring trilogy, I bought only the Extended Edition, to avoid double-dipping. Unlike the Lord of the Ring Extended Edition, which was truly awesome, I am slightly disappointed at the 13 additional minutes cut into the narrative, which make very little difference to its overall enjoyment. A song and dance performed by the Great Goblin did spice things up a little. The most surprising and equally best scene is Bilbo and Thorin accidentally overhearing a private conversation between Gandalf and Elrond that actually adds the characterization of Thorin.

TRIVIA:

It has an estimated budget of $180 million, but grossed a staggering $1,027 million worldwide, currently sitting at No. 15 on the All-Time Worldwide Movie Gross chart. Quite a feat!

FINAL THOUGHTS:

Although failing to reach the heights of the original 'Lord of the Rings' trilogy, Peter Jackson's return to Middle-earth is nevertheless a mildly enjoyable fantasy adventure. Minor, negligible quips with the filmmakers bloating a single book into three films aside, The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey makes for a decent start to a larger trilogy that will hopefully provide a more satisfying piece of entertainment. The blu ray set arrives with spectacular, demo-worthy video and a reference-quality audio presentation. Supplements for this Extended Edition are extensive and exhaustive with hours of information for fans to enjoy, making the overall package the preferred recommended purchase over the previous release.

The second part of this trilogy The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug will be in theatre December 13, 2013. The final part The Hobbit: There And Back Again hopefully will be in theatre December 17, 2014. As usual, I shall resist buying the initial blu ray release, waiting impatiently for the Extended Edition coming later on.
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17 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Mystical and Adventurous Journey, Dec 15 2012
By 
Stella Carrier "joyfulwoman2078" - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
"The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey" is a unique film that appears to obviously stir the concept of benevolent forces colliding with malevolent elements. "Ian Mckellen" returns in the pivotal role of Gandalf the Grey. He persuasively plays the wizard who strives to foster unity among Bilbo Baggins and the company of dwarves. Cate Blanchett (Elizabeth, Ponyo,Hanna) and Hugo Weaving (the Matrix films, Captain America, Cloud Atlas) also play important roles with the characters of Galadriel and Elrond. The artistic detail of the orcs and goblins are done in a one of a kind fashion, but I admit that they also remind me a little of some of the villain characters from my husband's World of Warcraft computer game. Many of the characters played an integral part to the plot of this film. However, two of my personal favorite characters were that of Bilbo Baggins (played by Martin Freeman) and Thorin Oakenshield (played by Richard Armitage). They both seem to be two sides of the same spiritual coin and challenge each other in way that brings out their spiritual growth. "The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey" is great for those who enjoyed any of the Lord Rings trilogies or like fantasy movies.
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16 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Humor, Action, Adventure and Fun, March 24 2013
By 
Tristan Vaillancourt (Ontario, Canada) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
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The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, took me to an unexpected place. Not having read the books at all, I was expecting a reprise of LOTR such that the title inherits the label 'adventure', all the while delivering a relentless march to overly drawn out wars.

I was pleasantly surprised that instead of a relentless, and quite frankly monotonous march to war, I was given the opportunity to laugh, explore wondrous places, see fantastic creatures, and truly feel as though I was witnessing an adventure. Fans of Harry Potter rejoice, you have in The Hobbit, an honest-to-goodness fun filled adventure waiting for you.

Overly serious movies about mythical places and creature are quite frankly, a bit disturbing. These types of movies are meant to be fun for the whole family, and that's exactly what this first installment of The Hobbit delivered. Bravo and two thumbs up to the cast, direction, and crew for giving us an excellent and entertaining film.

I expect things will get darker with the next installments, but if it's delivered with this caliber and attention to detail, The Hobbit it will be a trilogy for the ages.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey (Extended Ed.)(3D blu ray): top notched video & audio; story a little bloated; 3D is preferred, Nov. 22 2013
By 
Dr. Joseph Lee (Toronto, Canada) - See all my reviews
(TOP 10 REVIEWER)    (#1 HALL OF FAME)    (REAL NAME)   
VIDEO (3D):

The Extended Edition of The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey 3D arrives on blu ray with MPEG-4 MVC 1080p 2.40:1 encode. This transfer is truly dazzling, true to Jackson and cinematographer Andrew Lesnie's every intention. Jackson is a proponent of world-expanding 3D, the sort that draws viewers into the image rather than assaulting them with overabundant gimmicks and screen-piercing distractions. Depth and dimensionality are outstanding, with vast landscapes, convincingly distant horizons, rocks that jut out of the ground, trolls that loom high overhead, wargs whose muzzles inch closer and closer, goblins that push our heroes forward toward a most unsightly, all too three-dimensional Goblin King, and twisted riverfolk who seem to peer out of their cave and into your home theater. All the positive features in the 2D described below are all present in this simply gorgeous 3D presentation. (5/5)

VIDEO (2D):

This Extended Edition of The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey finally arrives on blu ray with MPEG-4 AVC 1080p 2.40:1 encode. Filmed entirely on a Red Epic camera system, this transfer is pristine and images are razor-sharp, like every leaf in treetops, every blade of grass and every pebble on the road with resounding clarity. The costumes of each character shows every thread and stitching with extraordinary definition, and individual hairs in the beards are very distinct. Close-ups reveal pores, wrinkles and negligible blemishes with lifelike textures. This transfer also displays a dazzlingly bold and colourful palette, even if the cinematography seems to favour the teal & orange aesthetic. Primaries are richly saturated and animated while a healthy assortment of secondary hues fills the screen with warmth and energy. A crisp, brilliant contrast allows for extraordinary visibility in the distance, exposing the tiniest objects in the background and the fine lines of various rock formations scattered throughout the New Zealand landscape. Black levels are true and inky, penetrating deep into the screen with luxurious gradations, while shadow details remain plain and sharply delineated. (5/5)

AUDIO:

Peter Jackson's return to Middle-earth comes with a DTS-HD 7.1 Master Audio soundtrack. This lossless mix is reference quality with a mid-range that is amazingly extensive and broad, exhibiting the smallest detail with superb, crystal-clear clarity. The tiny pops and sizzles of crackling fire are perfectly audible, and distant, individual droplets of water while in Gollum's cave crash unto rocks with accurate, realistic definition. In action sequences, the upper ranges are precise and distinct, giving each roaring yell and clash of metal upon metal extraordinary intelligibility. Along with the excellent dynamic range, the bass provides an appreciable role in Howard Shore's thrilling musical score, adding a great deal of depth and weight to the orchestration, especially when hearing the cellos and the low-pitched brass instruments. Meanwhile, dialogue remains lucid and well-prioritized in the center. (5/5)

CONTENT:

Like the Lord of the Ring trilogy, I bought only the Extended Edition, to avoid double-dipping. Unlike the Lord of the Ring Extended Edition, which was truly awesome, I am slightly disappointed at the 13 additional minutes cut into the narrative, which make very little difference to its overall enjoyment. A song and dance performed by the Great Goblin did spice things up a little. The most surprising and equally best scene is Bilbo and Thorin accidentally overhearing a private conversation between Gandalf and Elrond that actually adds the characterization of Thorin.

TRIVIA:

It has an estimated budget of $180 million, but grossed a staggering $1,027 million worldwide, currently sitting at No. 15 on the All-Time Worldwide Movie Gross chart. Quite a feat!

PACKAGING:

The 3D package has an elegant black, eco-elite keepcase with a middle panel that holds two discs on either side. There are 5 discs: 2 3D BD-50 discs, 1 2D BD-50 disc and 2 BD-50 discs for The Appendices: Parts 7 & 8 (all Region Free). The whole keepcase slides into a sturdy, attractive slipcover lightly textured to simulate leather.

FINAL THOUGHTS:

Although failing to reach the heights of the original Lord of the Rings trilogy, Peter Jackson's return to Middle-earth is nevertheless a mildly enjoyable fantasy adventure. Minor, negligible quips with the filmmakers bloating a single book into three films aside, The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey makes for a decent start to a larger trilogy that will hopefully provide a more satisfying piece of entertainment. The blu ray set arrives with spectacular, demo-worthy video and a reference-quality audio presentation. Supplements for this Extended Edition are extensive and exhaustive with hours of information for fans to enjoy, making the overall package the preferred recommended purchase over the previous release. In this case of Extended Edition, the 3D version is preferred.

The second part of this trilogy The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug will be in theatre December 13, 2013. The final part The Hobbit: There And Back Again hopefully will be in theatre December 17, 2014. As usual, I shall resist buying the initial blu ray release, waiting impatiently for the Extended Edition coming later on.
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31 of 38 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Most Welcomed Return to Middle Earth, Dec 14 2012
By 
John Kwok (New York, NY USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
Fans of Tolkien and fantasy films rejoice! Director Peter Jackson has conjured the impossible again, in this long-awaited return to Middle Earth, "The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey", that serves as a most compelling prequel to "The Lord of the Rings" trilogy and as a spectacular start to his "The Hobbit" trilogy. Purists may decry the fact that Jackson has added some characters from "The Lord of the Rings" films, but they will have forgotten that virtually all of them are accounted for in Tolkien's appendices to "The Lord of the Rings" and in the "Unfinished Tales". Whatever liberties taken by Jackson and his screenwriting collaborators - including his "The Lord of the Rings" collaborators Philippa Boyen and Fran Walsh, and Guillermo del Toro (who was designated originally as the director of two "The Hobbit" films) - remain consistent with Tolkien's spirit and vision of Middle-Earth, especially with its prior history before the events chronicled in "The Hobbit", and then, sixty years later, "The Lord of The Rings". Once more we are treated to epic filmmaking of a grand scale, with New Zealand standing in for Middle Earth; those who are especially familiar with the first movie, "The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring", will recognize much of the Middle-Earth countryside, from The Shire to Rivendell and beyond. But the scenery is merely the stage for the events which unfold, for which Jackson has assembled again a most impressive cast of actors to tell a gripping saga of truly monumental proportions; ample praise should be bestowed on Richard Armitage for his heroic portrayal as the dwarf king Thorin Oakenshield, leading his small band of dwarves on an all but hopeless quest fraught with ample danger, and Martin Freeman as the younger, more vigorous, Bilbo Baggins, portrayed by Ian Holm in "The Lord of the Rings" films. Fans of "Doctor Who" will barely recognize Sylvester McCoy, hidden in his nature-tinged makeup as the wizard Radagast, but his fine performance as the Middle Earth wizard will remind some of his decades-old portrayal of the Doctor. Of the other returning cast members from "The Lord of the Rings" films, Cate Blanchett ("Galadriel"), Hugo Weaving ("Elrond"), Christopher Lee ("Saruman") and Andy Serkus ("Gollum"), are splendid in their all too brief screen appearances; so too are two others whom I won't mention, simply to prevent myself from divulging any further spoilers.

There are intense scenes of physical and psychological combat throughout much of the film; the war of words that persist, with signs of mistrust between dwarves and elves, between a dwarf and a hobbit, are almost as riveting as the sword-fighting between dwarves and orcs, or in a spectacular battle deep within the bowels of one mountain, as the dwarves flee the Great Goblin (portrayed by Barry "Dame Edna" Humphries) and his army. Much of the film's cinematic pacing will remind fans of Jacksons' "The Lord of the Ring: The Return of the King", especially in its battles, which are fast-forward climatic and intense, despite a rather sluggish first half hour or so, accompanied by the familiar sounds of the London Philharmonic Orchestra playing Howard Shore's almost Wagnerian film score, which is compelling to listen in its own right, even with frequent borrowing of musical leitmotifs from "The Ring" films. Jackson, his cast and technical crew, held me spellbound for hours, with barely a dull moment or two, save for the film's first half hour. Don't believe any negative reviews written by professional film critics and others. If "The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey" can be seen by most as a compellingly first-rate example of cinematic storytelling at its best, then I have high hopes that the other two films in "The Hobbit" trilogy will be compared favorably with "The Lord of the Ring" trilogy; a feat that no visionary Hollywood director or producer has ever accomplished, especially George Lucas in his "Star Wars" prequel trilogy. Welcome back, Peter Jackson, and thank you for leading us on yet another spectacular cinematic adventure through Middle Earth. Long-time Tolkien fans will truly feel like they have left home and come back again; I, for one, know that I will take "An Unexpected Journey" again soon at my nearest movie theatre.
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18 of 22 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A revisit to a place less magical than you may remember, March 21 2013
By 
Derek Draven - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
When Peter Jackson wrapped up his epic shoot for the Lord of the Rings trilogy, fan speculation began whipping up into a fervour at the possibility of a Hobbit adaptation. The road to a silver screen treatment was paved with potholes, however. After several high profile lawsuits between Jackson and New Line Cinema, followed by a revolving door of potential directors, Jackson himself decided to get back behind the camera once more, and personally take charge of the return to Middle Earth. Here we are, a decade after 'The Fellowship of the Ring' landed in theaters. Is Middle Earth still as magical?

In the hands of a less skilled director, the answer would undoubtedly be "No." 'An Unexpected Journey' is the first in a brand new trilogy detailing the events of the Hobbit, and it's the first clue that the studio minds are determined to make as much money off the franchise as possible. Simply put, there is no real good reason for the Hobbit to be sliced up into three (very long) film installments. This is obvious 1/3 of the way into the movie. Tolkien buffs and story nuts will be just fine with all the talking, but those looking for an exciting romp will no doubt be left agitated at its slow pace. As before, the incredible Tolkien mythology is spread across every single frame of the film, from the enlightening opening, to the sprawling environments and characters. What's lacking, however, is heart. In many ways, the movie goes through the motions way too much for its own good. Battle scenes are nowhere near as inspired as they were in the LOTR films, and there's no true sense of dread to be found anywhere in the film. This is due mostly in part to the Hobbit's less urgent subject matter, which is little more than a raid to take back a lost dwarven city from a terrible dragon. We all know the story. Jackson and his co-writers have gone beyond this, however, and adapted material from several sources, most notably the Silmarillion, to fill in the gaps and provide a thicker, richer backstory with the appropriate foreshadowing of future events involving the One Ring, and its master Sauron. On paper, this seems like a good idea, but it doesn't translate as well as it should on film. Jackson has also tinkered with the story, and severely altered Tolkien canon in several key spots, which may throw off fans of the book, and confuse the casual movie fan.

The good news is that Middle Earth looks the same as it ever did. Hobbiton and Rivendell are sights for sore eyes, indeed, and Jackson's crew has gone through painstaking lengths to recreate every little nook and cranny that was present in the now defunct LOTR sets. It's like revisiting a comfortable vacation spot and finding everything in order. It's not without its faults, however. The Misty Mountain's orc-infested interior is too brightly lit to be very scary, and things aren't any better down below, in Gollum's cavern. 'Fellowship's' opening sequence depicted an appropriately dark and moody environment. Here, it looks like it was lit by a giant floodlight. This robs the scene of its tension, especially given the audience's familiarity with Gollum. Worse, the scene doesn't follow the established layout of 'Fellowship's' opening narrative sequence, which may seem like a small gripe, but it's actually a severe oversight. Returning characters like Galadriel and Saruman serve to anchor the story with familiarity, but neither Cate Blanchett nor Christopher Lee seem very energized this time around. On the whole, it's a noticeably quieter, more comfortable movie than its celluloid predecessors. It remains to be seen if the excitement will begin to build in the next chapter of the series, and the groundwork certainly has been laid, but to revisit Middle Earth a full ten years later, and be underwhelmed is...quite underwhelming, indeed.

Let's concentrate on the pluses. 'Journey' was practically designed with Blu-Ray in mind. It's a pristine and crystal clear picture with an obvious bout of digital saturation and contrasting for fantasy purposes. Being so new, it's most suited to the delivery media, but credit must be given to the visual team for being just as meticulous with the film as they were on the LOTR trilogy. The highly controversial 48FPS cut is not present on the Blu-Ray, and having seen both versions, I can safely say that's a good thing. I also cannot vouch for the 3D version of the film on Blu-ray, either. The audio track is a masterful work of art, with just the slightest bit of volume drop on the dialog channels, which can contrast something nasty when an action scene suddenly sprouts up. Special features are predictably limited on this initial release of the film, with 2 hours of Jackson's production diaries, and a 7 minute featurette on the locations used to film the movie. Frothing Hobbit fans will probably have no trouble with a double-dip, but the rest of us will probably want to hold off for the Extended Edition, which is bound to be released in the next 8 months or so, if the LOTR films were any indication. A number of scenes were cut from the theatrical release, and I would rather wait for the whole pizza, rather than half of it. If you absolutely must see the Hobbit again, then by all means, pick it up.

There's a lot to like about 'An Unexpected Journey,' and a lot to be disappointed about. Jackson's magnificent return to Tolkien's universe was unfortunately reduced to a dull roar, but that hasn't stopped legions of fans from packing theaters, and it won't stop the film from being snatched up in droves for watching at home, either. It's a gloriously beautiful film that could easily outshine any of its peers, but falls short of expectations on its own home turf. It's majesty, passion and visual beauty are simply flanked by the stench of too much studio greed, which sticks to the print like glue and refuses to apologize. The Hobbit could have been done successfully in the space of two movies. Three is just too much, and the audience is forced to swallow the filler as a result.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Unneccessaary but fun!, Jan. 12 2014
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The addition of extra scenes was fun to see but definitely were not needed in the film. The song the dwarves sing while staying with the elves is truly over play. The Dwarves actually seemed very happy to be there for quite awhile with the elves worrying about running out of supplies! Nice to have seen it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not iTunes friendly, Dec 28 2013
By 
Michael Bernasiewicz "mberna" (Toronto, ON CA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
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It may have been in the description somewhere and I missed it, but the Digital UV file available for download has usually been an iTunes friendly one in my experience. Instead there's a Flixster or Ultra Violet account required and if you're an iCloud/iTunes person, it's not as flexible. DVD seems ok.
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