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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Near perfect 4 CD collection, July 17 2013
By 
Stephen Bieth (Mississauga/ Canada) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Brothers And Sisters (4 CD) (Audio CD)
This set is freggin awsome. We start of with the remastered "Brothers and Sisters". An improvement over last reissue but not night and Day better. Anyone who has heard this CD knows how great this Album is so I won't even get into that.
The second CD is rehearsals, demo's and out takes. Interesting Disc and an excellence way to hear the Allmans at there last peak before a pile of crappy ones. Well at least until the reformed in the 80's. Those records are amazing as well.
Disc's 3 & 4 are a live show from that tour. Not Live at the Fillmore but pretty close to it. It's also interesting hearing them with just one guitar player. Since this was recorded for a radio broadcast by KSAN a radio station that recorded a lot of different bands the sound is excellent.
The box itself is pretty cheaply made. But it does have good liner notes and great photos.
All I can say is I am glad I bought it!!
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5.0 out of 5 stars A Classic Album by a Classic Band, Nov. 23 2013
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This review is from: Brothers And Sisters (4 CD) (Audio CD)
This is a good album. One of my all time favourites by the Allman Brothers. There is an extra cd of rehearsals, jams, and outtakes. 2 more cd's of live shows, Live at Winterland, september 26, 1973.
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5.0 out of 5 stars "Brothers and Sisters"....2013 Remaster....., July 9 2013
By 
Breadmanwalking (Toronto, Ontario, Canada) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
The sound has an element of improvement over the Capricorn remaster
from the past. Some of the keyboard work is more defined and that's
what caught my "ear"....on first listen. This is not hard rock with
extremely loud passages. Some re-issues don't capture the mellow...
In this case the mastering is warm. It was a pleasure to play this
through and for about $10 in Canada...this quality version can be a
part of your collection. Go ahead....look up BonnieScotland the seller
and....Add to Cart!
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Allmans underrated disc, Oct. 25 2003
By 
Train (Richmond, Virginia United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Brothers And Sisters (Audio CD)
After lengtly Fillmore and Eat A Peach discs, this album almost seems like an ep coming from the Allmans. Duane had already passed away, and Berry Oakley only contributed on two tracks before he was killed, so the recording of this disc couldnt been the best time for Grreg Allman. Maybe thats a reason for its short lenghth. In fact, this disc has more cuts written by Dickey Betts than Greg,(Betts wrote 4, Greg 3). Of course this disc is prabaly best known for containing Betts's Rambling man, but for me the highlights are Greg's Come and Go Blues and the equally bluesy Jelly Jelly. Jessica, an instrumental by Betts, is a great song also. While Im sure this album was recorded during a terrible time personally for the Allmans, It has stood the test of time well, and is one of their finer studio albums
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars CLASSIC, Nov. 3 2003
By 
This review is from: Brothers & Sisters (Audio CD)
THE BEST OF THE STUDIO CDS AND #2 TO LIVE AT THE FILLMORE.
JESSICA IS MY FAVORITE CUT.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Southern Rock Goes Mainstream, Nov. 19 2002
By 
Brian D. Rubendall (Oakton, VA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Brothers And Sisters (Audio CD)
After the tragic death of guitarist Duane Allman, The Allman Brothers regrouped and came up with their most accesssible album up until that time. Gone were the extended guitar workouts that had previously been their signature (indeed, the entire running length of "Brothers and Sisters" is barely longer than the half hour-plus song "Mountain Jam" from the preceeding album). In their place came some terrific songwriting hooks and their most popular single, "Ramblin' Man," which took its place alongside Lynyrd Skynyrd's "Sweet Home Alabama" as the twin towers of Southern rock anthems.
Other standout tracks include fine rockers "Wasted Words" and "Southbound," as well as the gorgeous instrumental "Jessica." The band also keeps in touch with its roots with "Come and Go Blues" and the more traditional country sounding "Pony Boy." Only the short length (only 7 tracks) of the album keep it feeling somewhat slight and out of 5 star territory.
Overall, a fine recording that once and for all established Southern rock as a cultrual force.
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4.0 out of 5 stars The end of their incredible run, Aug. 23 2003
By 
John Alapick (Harveys Lake, PA United States) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Brothers And Sisters (Audio CD)
Brothers And Sisters was the last of five consecutive strong albums released from the Allman Brothers Band. This was also the first studio album released after the untimely deaths of bassist Berry Oakley and guitarist Duane Allman. This would be the band's biggest success giving them their only #1 album and their highest charing single, "Ramblin' Man", which peaked at #2. However, this is the first album that they recorded that wasn't killer from beginning to end, even though it has its share of classic tracks.
With the death of Allman, Dickey Betts took on a much larger role in the band. His country influences are very prevalent here in both "Ramblin' Man" and the closing track "Pony Boy", which features his excellent slide work. He also contributes perhaps his most well known instrumental "Jessica", which is the strongest track here. Chuck Leavell's piano solo and Betts' guitar solo during this track still sound amazing today. Other strong tracks here include Gregg Allman's "Wasted Words" and Betts' "Southbound", both which feature outstanding playing by Leavell. The other two tracks written by Allman, "Come And Go Blues" and "Jelly Jelly" are decent, but not up to their usual high standard. Allman's vocals on this album also sound weaker than on their previous albums. Not their best album, but it was the best they would release again until Seven Turns in 1990.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Classic Southern Rock from the masters of the genre, May 24 2003
By 
This review is from: Brothers And Sisters (Audio CD)
It seems strange that the Allman Brothers' reputation has fallen off so much since the 1970's. While many of their contemporaries are still pretty highly regarded (Steely Dan, Neil Young, and Elton John among many others), ABB is in danger of becoming little more than a bad joke about pot smokers. Little enough has been written about "Brothers and Sisters" in this space that some younger readers might fail to realize that back in the day, this was a simply huge album, featuring not only the bona fide hit single "Ramblin' Man", but also one of the very finest instrumentals of the rock era, the effervescent "Jessica".
One reason for this is probably the rock fan's reluctance to accept country music, or even anything that hints at it. In some instances this may be mere prejudice towards products of "southern" culture, but more often it's probably just a side-effect of radio formatting tactics that try to separate the two forms rather than emphasize their (not insubstantial) commonalities. While not a real fan of country music myself, I see no reason to dislike any form of art out of sheer principle. It seems obvious that the more we can learn to appreciate (i.e., enjoy), the happier our lives will be.
That said, there's no question that the last couple of decades have not been kind to ABB's musical reputation, and a long string of weak releases hasn't helped any. That's a shame, because during their peak period, the Allmans created some fabulous music, including this excellent effort from 1973. "Wasted Words" and "Ramblin' Man" open the album with solid songwriting entries from both Greg Allman and Dicky Betts. While "Wasted" is not as strong a tune as some of Greg's earlier work, it still presents a heartfelt (or perhaps heartsick) personal statement. Still a staple of classic rock radio, "Ramblin' Man" features the trademark dual guitar lines, a tight little guitar solo, and some simple-but-effective dobro-work at the end. Greg Allman's commitment to the blues is represented by "Come And Go Blues", a funky progression with more personal introspection, and "Jelly Jelly" which is a much more traditional slow blues that will only appeal to the serious blues aficionado. "Southbound" is a much-underrated southern rocker, and "Jessica" is Betts' finest instrumental ever, and while his "Pony Boy" may seem too precious for some, it does have a certain playful charm.
Of course the real power of ABB is not in the songs themselves, but in the power of the playing, particularly in long instrumental solos, a tendency that is pretty much held in check here, presumably to keep the tracks radio-friendly. Rather than try to replace the irreplaceable guitar master Duane Allman, Chuck Leavell was brought in to play piano - a move that pays big dividends on this album. Like Duane, Leavell is simply a genius of his instrument: jazzy, playful, and melodic all at once. True, his music isn't as soulful as Duane's, but his solos possess that "hold onto your hat" quality that makes you want to hear them again and again until you know every note by heart.
The Allman Brothers' glory days are surely behind them now, but the musical legacy they've left behind is a truly impressive one that deserves to be preserved and honored forever. While this album is not quite up to their very best work ("Eat a Peach" is distinctly better), there's beautiful music here for any who can open their minds to it.
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5.0 out of 5 stars My favorite album of all time, Nov. 7 2002
This review is from: Brothers And Sisters (Audio CD)
This is the one!
What a great emotional, rewarding, musically brilliant album.
Everyone who I play it to somehow feels something special is happening.
Not a bad track on it.
'Jessica' would have to be the highlight track.
It's a shame there isn't any out-takes from these sessions at this time considering the amount of Re-Mastered CDs that are coming out with extra tracks.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Betts' bestt, April 13 2002
This review is from: Brothers And Sisters (Audio CD)
Although I generally don't like country rock music, the Allman Brothers are just good, with enough alluring rock and blues to make me forget the country. However, Brothers and Sisters has more of a country flavor than other of their albums. "Ramblin' Man" is a good song but, as well as a classic, it is a classic radio-tired song. Not to knock it, for people know that. I also like "Southbound," straight blues and fast-paced, strong musically, zippy soloing. The rest, to be honest, doesn't interest me except...
Yes, I think Dickie Betts has the stronger entries on the album. And yes, the reason I am writing this review is because of "Jessica." Betts may have composed it with his little daughter in mind, but boy, it is about all of us. Musically brilliant, but can anyone think of a WARMER song, country rock or otherwise? Rich in texture and spirit, it exudes brightness and optimism. Chuck Leavell's piano jamming hardly falls short of Betts' brilliant guitar, either, and the organ glows in the background. It is the Allmans' acme, apologizes to Duane, and simply one of the best things ever written. Certainly, "Jessica" alone justifies getting Brothers and Sisters. And if you like the Allmans' country style more than I, there is more reason.
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Brothers And Sisters (4 CD)
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