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t zero Paperback – Sep 6 1976


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 168 pages
  • Publisher: Mariner Books; 1 edition (Sept. 6 1976)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0156924005
  • ISBN-13: 978-0156924009
  • Product Dimensions: 13.3 x 1 x 20.3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 181 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #651,975 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

Calvino does what very few writers can do: he describes imaginary worlds with the most extraordinary precision and beauty. (New York Review of Books - Gore Vidal)

About the Author

Italo Calvino (15 October 1923 – 19 September 1985) was an Italian journalist and writer of short stories and novels. His best known works include the Our Ancestors trilogy (1952-1959), the Cosmicomics collection of short stories (1965), and the novels Invisible Cities (1972) and If on a Winter's Night a Traveler (1979). Lionised in Britain and America, he was, at the time of his death, the most-translated contemporary Italian writer.

Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Ryan on April 20 2001
Format: Paperback
To the people who hate this book, I grant you the freedom of your opinion, but I have to say, "You don't get it!" This isn't a narrative in the traditional sense of the word. Instead, Calvino has taken complex scientific principles and turned them into stories. Its true that there is a certain lack of character development, as the main character is a one-dimensional atomic particle (pun intended), but even so, Calvino makes him(it?) come alive in his tales. The true feature and attraction of these stories are the situation and worlds that Calvino creates. All that being said, I read this in the same day that I read Cosmicomics, which is a prior collections of similar stories featuring the same character (and, I think, a better book overall), and the artist's conceit wore a little thin. However, if you can give these books sufficient time and space(pun intended again), they are truly fun and beautiful.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 12 1999
Format: Paperback
Not surprisingly the two early reviews give it 1 and 5 respectively: a book about which it is impossible to be neutral. Confusing,dense, boring writing there is - but also some amazing mathematic/scietific concepts whch Calvino masterly spins into stories - the logic/illogic (which are probably simultaneously both the same and opposite) outcomes baffle and amaze. The final section was more rewarding (being more time-space maths based) - couldn't get a handle on the evolutionary/biological stuff. I also suspect I want to read more about the text and continually get beneath its skin. Will read bits again and again and again. (Not a tour de force of narrative analysis compared to "if on a winter's night..." and castle of crossed destinies)
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Format: Paperback
Calvino is one of the masters of post-modernism,
and his tales fiction highlight one of the most
fundamental concerns of the movement:
challenging notions of a "reality". t zero reigns
as Calvino's finest, most compelling work
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 6 1999
Format: Paperback
Qfwfqu, an immortal being, guides the reader through the evolution of Earth. Highly repetetive with no character action.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 9 reviews
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
Brilliantly imaginative, if somewhat tedious. April 20 2001
By Ryan - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
To the people who hate this book, I grant you the freedom of your opinion, but I have to say, "You don't get it!" This isn't a narrative in the traditional sense of the word. Instead, Calvino has taken complex scientific principles and turned them into stories. Its true that there is a certain lack of character development, as the main character is a one-dimensional atomic particle (pun intended), but even so, Calvino makes him(it?) come alive in his tales. The true feature and attraction of these stories are the situation and worlds that Calvino creates. All that being said, I read this in the same day that I read Cosmicomics, which is a prior collections of similar stories featuring the same character (and, I think, a better book overall), and the artist's conceit wore a little thin. However, if you can give these books sufficient time and space(pun intended again), they are truly fun and beautiful.
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
I liked it but......... May 12 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Not surprisingly the two early reviews give it 1 and 5 respectively: a book about which it is impossible to be neutral. Confusing,dense, boring writing there is - but also some amazing mathematic/scietific concepts whch Calvino masterly spins into stories - the logic/illogic (which are probably simultaneously both the same and opposite) outcomes baffle and amaze. The final section was more rewarding (being more time-space maths based) - couldn't get a handle on the evolutionary/biological stuff. I also suspect I want to read more about the text and continually get beneath its skin. Will read bits again and again and again. (Not a tour de force of narrative analysis compared to "if on a winter's night..." and castle of crossed destinies)
6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
One of the finest works of post-modernist fiction. Aug. 26 1997
By bibini@hotmail.com - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Calvino is one of the masters of post-modernism,
and his tales fiction highlight one of the most
fundamental concerns of the movement:
challenging notions of a "reality". t zero reigns
as Calvino's finest, most compelling work
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
outrageously funny, and deep enough to wash your hair March 15 2007
By robert merrick - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
the notion of remembering back to when we were all dry inside and it was wet outside, before we turned ourselves inside out and carried the wet within us in a dry world is enough to recommend this book to any and all - the bit about how birds got in the world is icing on the cake.
Unconventional, Strange: Calvino Oct. 11 2014
By Aniko Carmean - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
I love Calvino. I can think of no other writer who can spin a story that has neither plot nor standard characters and yet still give you that soul-thrill of having read a bit of undiluted (if strange) truth. T-ZERO is experimental, even by Calvino's odd-junky standards. A cell narrates the process of mitosis, and the difficulty of loving when there is no absolute, total way to KNOW the beloved. Other stories examine the relationship of time to cause and effect and, yes, Calvino leaves it to the reader to choose either the man or the lion. Prisoners attempt to escape a mutating, hallucinogenic stockade, a man is pursued (or pursuer) in a mathematical allegory set in a traffic jam, and inhuman, pre-historic, pre-life sentients chase the perfect crystals as the Earth forms. The most beautiful stories are in the opening section, MORE OF QFWQF. The story THE SOFT MOON is amazing, but if you read nothing else by Calvino read BLOOD, SEA. The closing paragraph is an inspired culmination of emotional impact. It is perfect, even in translation. Go forth, my friends, and enjoy the wonders of T-ZERO.


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