Quantity:1
CDN$ 16.31 + CDN$ 3.49 shipping
In Stock. Sold by eplayplay
+ CDN$ 3.49 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Ships from the USA. Please allow 14-21 business days for delivery. Ex-Library Book - will contain Library Markings. Book shows a small amount of wear to cover and binding. Some pages show signs of use. Sail the Seas of Value.
Compare Offers on Amazon
Add to Cart
CDN$ 38.80
+ CDN$ 3.49 shipping
Sold by: M and N Media Canada
Add to Cart
CDN$ 42.34
+ CDN$ 3.49 shipping
Sold by: 5A/30 Entertainment
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

2001: A Space Odyssey (Widescreen)

4.2 out of 5 stars 329 customer reviews

List Price: CDN$ 24.98
Price: CDN$ 16.31
You Save: CDN$ 8.67 (35%)
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by eplayplay.
5 new from CDN$ 16.31 20 used from CDN$ 0.57


Frequently Bought Together

  • 2001: A Space Odyssey (Widescreen)
  • +
  • 2010: The Year We Make Contact [Import]
  • +
  • Dr. Strangelove: Special Edition (Bilingual)
Total price: CDN$ 32.91
Buy the selected items together

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Product Details

  • Actors: Keir Dullea, Gary Lockwood, William Sylvester, Daniel Richter, Leonard Rossiter
  • Directors: Stanley Kubrick
  • Writers: Stanley Kubrick, Arthur C. Clarke
  • Producers: Stanley Kubrick, Victor Lyndon
  • Format: Anamorphic, Closed-captioned, Color, Dolby, DVD-Video, Original recording remastered, Widescreen, NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English, Spanish, French
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada This DVD will probably NOT be viewable in other countries. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: G
  • Studio: Warner Home Video
  • Release Date: June 12 2001
  • Run Time: 149 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars 329 customer reviews
  • ASIN: B00005ASUM
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #19,733 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)
  •  Would you like to update product info, give feedback on images, or tell us about a lower price?

Product Description

Product Description

EDITOR'S NOTE: According to a Warner Home Video technician involved in the production of The Stanley Kubrick Collection, Kubrick authorized all aspects of the Collection, from the use of Digital Component Video (or "D-1") masters originally

Special Features

EDITOR'S NOTE: According to a Warner Home Video technician involved in the production of The Stanley Kubrick Collection, Kubrick authorized all aspects of the Collection, from the use of Digital Component Video (or "D-1") masters originally approved in 1989, to the use of minimalist screen menus, chapter stops, and (in the case of 2001: A Space Odyssey and The Shining on DVD) supplementary materials. Full-screen presentation of The Shining and Full Metal Jacket was also approved by Kubrick, who recomposed his original framing, reportedly believing that those films looked best on video in the full-screen format. (In fact, the original theatrical aspect ratio of The Shining was 1.66:1, meaning that a relatively small portion of the image is lost.) Kubrick also chose mono over stereo, believing that inconsistencies in theatrical sound systems resulted in loss of control over theatrical presentation. In every respect, the Warner spokesman said, the films in the Collection remain as Kubrick approved them. Any future attempt to remaster or alter them would have to be approved by an appointee of the Kubrick estate. --This text refers to an alternate DVD edition.

See all Product Description

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
This masterpiece has such depth, it continues to resonates to this day.
Although 1960's vision, bold nonetheless, and we are not doing presently
What was envisioned previously and what could have been leaving Earth.
So now we must grapple with actual globe warming here
And with ensuing consequences...
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
Format: Blu-ray
The story is not easy to tell. It starts out with a group of apes struggling to survive until they realize they can use animal bones as weapons to fight the other gangs. It would be reasonable to conclude this group that survives and learns from its environment is our ancestor. From there, the story suddenly jumps to thousands of years in time, and shows the story of Dave, an astronaut in a spacecraft. The rest of the movie is his struggle with HAL, the computer that controls the spacecraft. The movie ends up with a trippy sequence that critics and viewers are still trying to make sense of today, after several decades of the release of the movie. Nobody can agree on what it means. And, that is a testament to the power of this sci-fi movie. It still makes people think what the story means, what it is suggesting at, and how to make sense of the colors, imagery and that trippy ending sequence. All this has meant that critics and viewers contend that this is probably the best sci-fi movie that will ever be made.

This movie was made in 1968, a year before humans set foot on the moon. And, we know what the stage of technology was back then. The computer that landed our astronauts on the moon had less RAM than what we have in our calculators today. Therefore, the fact that this movie was able to convincingly show us a futuristic vision so believable that we still use the special effects in this movie as a template for showing space scenes in movies even today speaks to the impact this movie has had on filmmaking.
3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
By LeBrain HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on Feb. 15 2011
Format: Blu-ray
Once upon a time, when the year 2001 seemed aeons away, director Stanley Kubruck (Dr. Strangelove) contacted author Arthur C. Clarke (Childhood's End) to discuss making "the proverbial good science fiction movie". Both were sick of films that passed for science fiction, but were actually monster movies set in space, or were fiction films with the science replaced by fantasy.

The result was 2001: A Space Odyssey, the film, and a companion book of the same name which is actually a completely different animal. The film -- striking, innovative, visually engrossing, ambiguous, and scientifically solid -- is as good today as it was in 1968, even if many of the "predictions" of the film have failed to come to pass. (Perhaps if the shuttle didn't explode in '86, we'd be closer to having moon bases today?)

Separated into four chapters (The Dawn Of Man, TMA-1, Jupiter Mission (and an intermission with music), and finally Jupiter and Beyond the Infinite), 2001 has no dialogue at all for the entire first quarter of the film. Beginning with a blank screen and "Atmospheres" by Ligeti, this is a film paradoxically anchored by both music and silence. The screen changes to the Earth rising over the moon, and the sun rising over the Earth (an important clue and recurring symbol) accompanied by "Thus Spoke Zarathustra". We are then introduced to a tribe of pre-human apes (Australopithecus, perhaps), starving and on the verge of extinction. Other tribes are stronger and out-competing them. There is no dialogue here but the barking of the apes, yet that and the scenery speak volumes. Suddenly one morning, the game has changed: A mysterious black monolith has appeared. The apes are drawn to it, and soon find that they are now able to compete with predators thanks to a new discovery: weapons.
Read more ›
20 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
By LeBrain HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on Dec 23 2009
Format: DVD
Once upon a time, when the year 2001 seemed aeons away, director Stanley Kubruck (Dr. Strangelove) contacted author Arthur C. Clarke (Childhood's End) to discuss making "the proverbial good science fiction movie". Both were sick of films that passed for science fiction, but were actually monster movies set in space, or were fiction films with the science replaced by fantasy.

The result was 2001: A Space Odyssey, the film, and a companion book of the same name which is actually a completely different animal. The film -- striking, innovative, visually engrossing, ambiguous, and scientifically solid -- is as good today as it was in 1968, even if many of the "predictions" of the film have failed to come to pass. (Perhaps if the shuttle didn't explode in '86, we'd be closer to having moon bases today?)

Separated into four chapters (The Dawn Of Man, TMA-1, Jupiter Mission (and an intermission with music), and finally Jupiter and Beyond the Infinite), 2001 has no dialogue at all for the entire first quarter of the film. Beginning with a blank screen and "Atmospheres" by Ligeti, this is a film paradoxically anchored by both music and silence. The screen changes to the Earth rising over the moon, and the sun rising over the Earth (an important clue and recurring symbol) accompanied by "Thus Spoke Zarathustra". We are then introduced to a tribe of pre-human apes (Australopithecus, perhaps), starving and on the verge of extinction. Other tribes are stronger and out-competing them. There is no dialogue here but the barking of the apes, yet that and the scenery speak volumes. Suddenly one morning, the game has changed: A mysterious black monolith has appeared.
Read more ›
4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse



Feedback