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Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass Hardcover – Mar 10 2010

4.5 out of 5 stars 224 customer reviews

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Hardcover, Mar 10 2010
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 448 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Classics; Pck edition (March 10 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0141192461
  • ISBN-13: 978-0141192468
  • Product Dimensions: 13.5 x 2.8 x 20.6 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 522 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars 224 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #44,501 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

From the Publisher

In 1862 Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, a shy Oxford mathematician with a stammer, created a story about a little girl tumbling down a rabbit hole. Thus began the immortal adventures of Alice, perhaps the most popular heroine in English literature. Countless scholars have tried to define the charm of the Alice books--with those wonderfully eccentric characters the Queen of Hearts, Tweedledum and Tweedledee, the Cheshire Cat, Mock Turtle, the Mad Hatter et al.--by proclaiming that they really comprise a satire on language, a political allegory, a parody of Victorian children's literature, even a reflection of contemporary ecclesiastical history. Perhaps, as Dodgson might have said, Alice is no more than a dream, a fairy tale about a trials and tribulations of growing up--or down, or all turned round--as seen through the expert eyes of a child. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Amazon

That Alice. When she's not traipsing after a rabbit into Wonderland, she's gallivanting off into the topsy-turvy world behind the drawing-room looking glass. In Through the Looking Glass, Lewis Carroll's masterful and zany sequel to Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, she makes more eccentric acquaintances, including Tweedledee and Tweedledum, the White Queen, and a somewhat grumpy Humpty Dumpty. Through a giant and elaborate chess game, Alice explores this odd country, where one must eat dry biscuits to quench thirst, and run like the wind to stay in one place. As in life, Alice must stay on her toes to learn the rules of this game. Through the Looking Glass immediately took its rightful place beside its partner on the shelf of eternal classics. And luckily for generations of enraptured children, Carroll was again able to persuade John Tenniel to create the fantastic woodblock engravings that have become so indelibly associated with the Alice stories. For almost 130 years, Alice's curious adventures have amused, perplexed, and delighted readers, young and old. This gorgeous, deluxe boxed set of both volumes contains engravings from Tenniel's original woodblocks that were discovered in a London bank in 1985, and reproduced for the first time here. "'What is the use of a book,' thought Alice, 'without pictures?'" What indeed? (All ages) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is the first book I downloaded for my brand new Kindle. I thought I would start off with a classic. After finishing the book in less than 30 minutes, I thought it was rather short but thought nothing of it. Later, as I was reading the summary of the book on Wikipedia, I noticed that I did not recognize entire chapters that I had read from that very morning! Turns out that CHAPTERS are missing from this book. I don't even know if other chapters are shortened as well. But awfully disappointed, especially for my first purchase. Why would Amazon sell me a shortened version of this classic book without telling me? I was under the impression that I was reading the real thing. My first 1 star rating.

edit: My kindle downloaded the Kindle Edition, Feb. 26 2010 CDN $1.00
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Format: Paperback
People tend to lump "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" and "Through the Looking-Glass (and What Alice Found There)" into one collection which has taken on the new title of "Alice in Wonderland". This is probably a product of the movies, which took bits and pieces from each and made a composite adventure. This was possible, because Lewis Carroll (a.k.a. Reverend Charles Lutwidge Dodgson) managed to make the stories so even in quality that they can be put together seamlessly. He also managed to keep the stories enough different, that one can still enjoy reading both of them one after the other, without the feeling that the second is just a retelling of the first.

To be sure, there are several ways in which the stories are similar, but not to the point where it detracts from the reader's enjoyment of the story. There are only three characters which appear in both books, one of which is Alice. The other notable characters (the Cheshire Cat, the Queen of Hearts, Tweedledum and Tweedledee, Humpty Dumpty, etc.) are well distributed between the two books. Thus there is a looking-glass between the two, just as the looking-glass plays such a key role in the second book.

The Penguin Classics edition of "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass" includes both books including the illustrations by John Tenniel. It also includes the original "Alice's Adventures under Ground" which includes Lewis Carroll's artwork. For additional features, it includes `"Alice" on the Stage' an article which Lewis Carroll wrote after seeing a production of the stage version, and it includes preface's to the books which Lewis Carroll wrote in 1896 for the 1897 editions. There are wonderful notes for both books, and a very informative introduction by Hugh Haughton.
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Format: Paperback
Six months have passed since Alice took her trip to Wonderland. She is now seven and a half and bored, so decides to go through the looking glass and see how different it is on the other side. Everything is turned around, interesting, everything goes backward instead of forward. Alice meets the chess board characters, kings, queens, castles, pawns. She decides to leave the room and go into the garden where there are so many beautiful flowers, and all of them talk. There is so much good, silly conversation. The flowers all wonder at Alice. What kind of creature is she? The queens come back and forth and out of Alice's journey. She must travel through this new country. And so many animals and folks disapprove of Alice and her ways and don't mind criticizing her.

She meets some interesting characters on her travels. Tweedledum and Tweedledee are a pair who talk a lot of nonsense. But all the inhabitants of Looking Glass Land do. Alice doesn't know what to say or think. She is trying to be a nice amiable child. But it is hard around these.

Characters start as one, a person who turns into an animal, then back to a character. Then comes in inevitable Humpty Dumpty, well known to so many children. The Lion and the Unicorn are another pair. The Red King and Queen, The White King and Queen, the White Knight all act so silly and childish that Alice seems the more adult and sensible of the crowd.

There is so much silly talk, many nice rhyming poems. Kids will love this book, reading it themselves and for younger ones, being read the poems will delight them. These books have been read and loved by young and old since 1865.
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By A Customer on March 6 2004
Format: Hardcover
I'm not reviewing the story (we all know what a masterpiece it is :) but this edition is fabulous! It is actually two seperate dust-jacketed hardcover volumes, one for each tale, and they come in one very sturdy slipcase with beautiful art. For the current Amazon price it is a *total* bargain - I wasn't expecting it to be so nice. We also got the jigsaw puzzle book to go with it and it is also better than expected. They make a great gift for a lucky little gal!
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Format: Hardcover
For some reason Amazon bundles all reviews of every edition of under a single product making it very difficult to evaluate a particular one. So you may be looking for the Ingpen edition but unable to find an Ingpen review.

I fell in love with the Ingpen edition when I saw it in the store. Every page turn features an outstanding color illustration by one of the of the world's leading illustrators.

In Alice she says:'what good are stories without pictures?' We can read a story without a picture, yet when we have a picture it really helps us in imagining the story, and Ingpen has a great imagination when it comes to the picture story.

This is the kind of book you will leave on the coffee table just so you can show it off to your friends. Whether you are a parent or just reading it your own pleasure, I found reading it this way much better. I do own a pictureless version which I never got around to reading.

Sterling publishers have published other stories with Ingpen such as the Wizard of Oz. So if you wish to enjoy a classic story and to fire your visual imagination at the same time this is a great way to do it. I passed my version along to a niece and have the occasional pang of regret for having given it away.

I highly recommend it, think you will love it and hope this was helpful.
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