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All the President's Men [Blu-ray] (Sous-titres français) [Import]

4.5 out of 5 stars 85 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Actors: Dustin Hoffman, Robert Redford, Jack Warden, Martin Balsam, Hal Holbrook
  • Directors: Alan J. Pakula
  • Writers: Bob Woodward, Carl Bernstein, William Goldman
  • Producers: Jon Boorstin, Michael Britton, Walter Coblenz
  • Format: DTS Surround Sound, Subtitled, Widescreen, NTSC, Import
  • Language: English, French, Spanish
  • Subtitles: English, French, Spanish
  • Region: All Regions
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: PG
  • Studio: Warner Home Video
  • Release Date: Feb. 15 2011
  • Run Time: 138 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars 85 customer reviews
  • ASIN: B001SARO9Q
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Product Description

Product Description

Quick Shipping !!! New And Sealed !!! This Disc WILL NOT play on standard US DVD player. A multi-region PAL/NTSC DVD player is request to view it in USA/Canada. Please Review Description.

Amazon.ca

It helps to have one of history's greatest scoops as your factual inspiration, but journalism thrillers just don't get any better than All the President's Men. Dustin Hoffman and Robert Redford are perfectly matched as (respectively) Washington Post reporters Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward, whose investigation into the Watergate scandal set the stage for President Richard Nixon's eventual resignation. Their bestselling exposé was brilliantly adapted by screenwriter William Goldman, and director Alan Pakula crafted the film into one of the most intelligent and involving of the 1970s paranoid thrillers. Featuring Jason Robards in his Oscar-winning role as Washington Post editor Ben Bradlee, All the President's Men is the film against which all other journalism movies must be measured. --Jeff Shannon --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
Not only is this movie factual and concise to what transpired and the work Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein did to unravel it all. But is still important viewing to this day to get a glimpse of the intricacies, knowledge, and fear the White House is still capable of. As Nixon said to David Frost, he felt he was above the law in order to keep the laws in place. And what's more scary are those that went along with him to carry that out. (FBI, CIA, Campaign staff, etc.) All of which were either partially unknowing and/or fearful of knowing more than they already did. To many, it was a sloppy sneak peek at the Democratic party to see what was up their sleeve. What should be important to most to this day is the coordinated effort and connections it took to carry that out. Either by enacting it, or looking the other way to avoid true justice. And not to sound like a fear monger, but this incident wasn't the first time the White House engaged in this type of practice, and certainly wasn't the last time. It's merely the ONLY time kids were caught with their hands in the cookie jar, and confessed their big brother told them to do it. Mature, educated and powerful people with paranoia protecting mature powerful people with convenient apathy. Be it Liddy, Halderman, the Congress Librarian, to Nixon himself. Leaders and officials that 'forgot' or denied the knowledge they wanted to know so bad to make them that much more knowledgeable and powerful as leaders and oppressors of their competition. Brilliantly insane! And the journalistic integrity of Woodward and Bernstein to 'follow the money', get the info from the leads, and put the pieces together to become more knowledgeable than those involved.Read more ›
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Format: DVD
The mystery is a mystery no more. We now know "Deep Throat" is W. Mark Felt, who was deputy director of the FBI at the time. Some call him a hero, others a traitor. I think Felt had a lot of guts, and in the end he did the right thing and in so doing became one of the world's first whistleblowers. The fact that Hal Holbrook (who plays Deep Throat in the movie) bears an uncanny resemblance to Felt makes for even more incredulous viewing.
This movie, with an all star cast (including Robert Redford, Dustin Hoffman, Jason Robards, F. Murray Abraham, Meredith Baxter, Polly Holliday, Stephen Collins, Ned Beatty, etc., and even the real Frank Wills, the Watergate security guard who first reported the break-in) is a must see film for any journalism student or anyone who is just fascinated by the biggest scandal of the 20th century. The jacket cover says it all: "Get the story -- and get it right."
Watch this movie, and you'll find out how Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein got the story, and how they refused to crack under incredible pressure to back off. We also learn among other things how they nearly blew it all when they got one part of the story right, but named the wrong source.
Today's crop of journalists don't hold a candle to Woodstein. After you see this movie, you'll know why -- and why we need guys and gals like them more than ever, especially in these troubled times.
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Format: DVD
All the Presidents's Men is a truly wonderful film.
Unfortunately, it was also one of the first films to be released on the DVD format. Because the format was experimental, the studios were not willing to spend lavish amounts of money to create a DVD when the format might not even sell to the public (see Sony's Mini-Disc). So in what was a sound business decision, but a horrible decision for fans of the film, All the President's Men was given the bare bones treatment. Why spend the money is nobody is going to buy the machine to play the disc? That means both no special features (which still plagues some new releases) as well as making the quality of the film transfer just plain bad. Is it better than VHS? Yes, but not by much. A couple of the other reviews have mentioned that the picture and sound quality is fine. I'm guessing that these folks either lack the technology to exploit the marvels of DVD, or simply have not viewed enough DVDs to know what is good from bad.
Unfortunately, this is simply bad. The report from Widescreen Review speaks for itself, but I think it important to restate that fact that the positive reviews about the DVD transfer are wrong. All the President's Men doesn't have the action-packed scenes that take full advantage of Dolby Digital sound. But the 2.0 Dolby that is used isn't good. There is too much background noise and there isn't much difference between using your home theatre system vs. the speakers from your television. And compared to the picture quality, the sound is great. As I watched the DVD, I couldn't believe how bad the picture quality is. I know that a 25 year old film isn't going to be as crisp and clear as a film made last summer.
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Format: DVD
"All the President's Men" remains one of my favorites. Not only was it produced so well, it's also a textbook for screenwriting.
Woodward and Bernstein's book of the same title was an account of their Watergate reporting. In it they very wisely referred to themselves as a unified, second-tier character in third-person, which allowed them to get out of the way of their own reporting.
William Goldman's screen adaptation was inspired and brilliant. The job of any screenwriter adapting a work is to realize the smaller, and separate, story within the original that will be the cinematic story. Although Richard Nixon was Woodward and Bernstein's main character, Goldman realized the cinematic story was about two young reporters unheard of outside the DC area, and that without guard Frank Wills discovering a piece of tape on a lock things most likely would have remained that way. The action, then, is in the newsroom, not the White House.
Any serious screenwriter hopeful should read the book, then take apart the film version to see how it's done.
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