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Anywhere But Here (Widescreen) [Import]

3.9 out of 5 stars 66 customer reviews

Price: CDN$ 30.76
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Product Details

  • Actors: Susan Sarandon, Natalie Portman, Hart Bochner, Eileen Ryan, Ray Baker
  • Directors: Wayne Wang
  • Writers: Alvin Sargent, Mona Simpson
  • Producers: Ginny Nugent, Laurence Mark, Petra Alexandria
  • Format: Widescreen, NTSC, Import
  • Language: English, French
  • Subtitles: English, Spanish
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada This DVD will probably NOT be viewable in other countries. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: PG-13
  • Studio: 20th Century Fox
  • Release Date: May 2 2000
  • Run Time: 114 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars 66 customer reviews
  • ASIN: B00003W8NN
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Product Description

Product Description

In Wayne Wang's star-driven adaptation of Mona Simpson's tragicomic bestseller about a mismatched mother and daughter, fortysomething Adele August (Susan Sarandon) is every adolescent's nightmare: over- (or under-) dressed, always and loudly "on," forgetful of mundane matters such as bills, more colorful kid than reliable mum. In contrast, 14-year-old Ann (Natalie Portman) yearns for stability, roots, understated hues. Transplanted from Wisconsin small town and extended family to a Beverly Hills, California, address of choice for American Dreamers like Adele, Ann comes painfully of age--sometimes blighted but also enriched by the fictions of a charismatic parent afraid to be alone in the dark. Wang has always shown a sure, caring hand when it comes to cross-generational angst (see Dim Sum: A Little Bit of Heart, The Joy Luck Club, Smoke). Here, he encourages Sarandon in a remarkably brave, exposed performance as an aging adventuress whose imagination continually outstrips her ability to make dreams come true, whose charm is both her ticket to ride and a dead end. Portman's pout of strained adolescent distaste soon wears thin, but when The Phantom Menace's kabuki princess momentarily thaws, she projects a lost child's terrible shock and confusion. Hollywood-sized and scripted by the numbers, Anywhere but Here lost ground to Tumbleweeds, a similarly themed but more nuanced indie (with Oscar-nominated Janet McTeer), and it can't hold a candle to Barbara Stanwyck's Stella Dallas (1937), top of the line in this particular genre. But for any daughter who's looked into her mother's face and--yikes!--seen a possible future, this trip's definitely worth taking. --Kathleen Murphy

Amazon.ca

In Wayne Wang's star-driven adaptation of Mona Simpson's tragicomic bestseller about a mismatched mother and daughter, fortysomething Adele August (Susan Sarandon) is every adolescent's nightmare: over- (or under-) dressed, always and loudly "on," forgetful of mundane matters such as bills, more colorful kid than reliable mum. In contrast, 14-year-old Ann (Natalie Portman) yearns for stability, roots, understated hues. Transplanted from Wisconsin small town and extended family to a Beverly Hills, California, address of choice for American Dreamers like Adele, Ann comes painfully of age--sometimes blighted but also enriched by the fictions of a charismatic parent afraid to be alone in the dark.

Wang has always shown a sure, caring hand when it comes to cross-generational angst (see Dim Sum: A Little Bit of Heart, The Joy Luck Club, Smoke). Here, he encourages Sarandon in a remarkably brave, exposed performance as an aging adventuress whose imagination continually outstrips her ability to make dreams come true, whose charm is both her ticket to ride and a dead end. Portman's pout of strained adolescent distaste soon wears thin, but when The Phantom Menace's kabuki princess momentarily thaws, she projects a lost child's terrible shock and confusion. Hollywood-sized and scripted by the numbers, Anywhere but Here lost ground to Tumbleweeds, a similarly themed but more nuanced indie (with Oscar-nominated Janet McTeer), and it can't hold a candle to Barbara Stanwyck's Stella Dallas (1937), top of the line in this particular genre. But for any daughter who's looked into her mother's face and--yikes!--seen a possible future, this trip's definitely worth taking. --Kathleen Murphy

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
This is a tedious, overlong character study about the dysfunctional relationship between an irresponsible and self centered mother and her pouty teenage daughter. Adele August (Susan Sarandon) leaves her home in Wisconsin and drags her 14 year old daughter (Natalie Portman) to a new life in the bright lights of Los Angeles. The problem is it is the same old hopeless life in a brand new place.
There is really no story here, just a series of situations for mother and daughter to bicker over so we can be convinced how intense a love-hate relationship they have with one another. The characters spent the entire movie trying to confuse us as to which of them was more immature.
This is a classic example of how good acting cannot save a bad screenplay. Both Sarandon and Portman did an outstanding job of playing their characters. But each of them were playing characters that were so repellent that there was nowhere to turn for relief. Of the two, Portman evoked a sense of pity for poor Ann, who had to be stuck with such an obnoxious and putrid mother. Admittedly, I have to give Sarandon credit for doing such a fine job of making Adele so distasteful.
I rated this film a 3/10, despite fine performances by both leads. I just don't feel it is entertaining to spend two hours watching two puerile characters snipe at one another. I would only recommend this movie to women who had bad relationships with their mothers (probably a large demographic now that I think of it) for the obvious identification factor. Perhaps this film will make them feel a little better that they are not alone in their frustration and anger. For all others, I would suggest pushing bamboo under your fingernails as an attractive alternative to this torturous film.
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Format: DVD
Susan Sarandon and Natalie Portman are two very talented actress. They are the reason that makes me buy this DVD. And their performances are superb. However, the script is a little loose.
It is about a Mom Adele who is a little bit wild and crazy, who loves so much about her daughter and thinks her planning on her will simply be the best for her. While the daughter Ann has her own preferences, which makes her always wants to escape from her mom. What makes this simple story even more flat (unfortunate) is the script does not provide any chemistry and dynamics between these 2 characters. We know their conflicts, but sometimes, we see the daughter hates her mom, and suddenly, she is be-friending with her. Even both actress tries hard to make them 2 believable characters, still the story lacks certain sparkle to make this a 'real good' movie. Fortunately, the performance of Sarandon and Portman never disappoints you throughout the whole movie.
The ending concludes the movie very well:
Ann: "Even if you can't stand her (the Mom). Even if you hate her. Even if she's ruining your life. There's something about my mother. Some romance, some power. And when she dies, the world will be flat. Too simple, too fair... Too reasonable."
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Format: VHS Tape
This movie features Adele August (Susan Sarandon) , an unstable and over the top prima donna , and her quest for meaning , which sadly makes life miserable for her level headed and reserved 14 year old daughter Anne (Natalie Portman).
I am not a fan of Susan Sarandon and certainly had no sympathy for her character, but I love Natalie Portman, and sympathized with her struggle for emotional comfort and stability throughout the movie.
Natalie Portman always exhudes great beauty warmth and cuteness, in whatever role she plays.
One feels great compassion at Anne's' pain, when she is ripped up from her environment in Wisconsin by her mother and taken to a poky little flat in Hollywood, or when encouraged by her friends, she phones her remarried father, and he cruelly snubs her.
Another touching scene is when she abandons her plan of tricking her 'boyfriend' to humiliate him, and simply falls into his embrace , clutching at a little love , love that she desperately needs and deserves.
The movie highlights the damage done to children, by single parent families, and captures the longing of Anne for a stable home life , which all children should have and deserve.
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Format: DVD
Everybody did a good job in this movie. The storyline was very nice and it teaches many lessons. The only weakness is that it drags a little a some points. They could have sped it up a lot and it would have been better.
The plot is nothing original. It's been done dozens of times, so it's very hard to make it seem unique. This movie does have a uniqueness, mostly in the contrasting personalities of the two stars.
A twice-divorced, flamboyant, middle-aged mother (Susan Sarandon) moves with her unwilling teenage daughter (Natalie Portman) from small-town Wisconsin to Beverly Hills, apparently to fulfill some life-long dream of the mother's to live it up in California and for her daughter to become an actress. The daughter leaves behind a very close friend and a cousin and complains every step of the way.
The mother makes one financial mistake after another and they constantly have their electricity and telephone shut off because she doesn't pay the bills. They move from apartment to apartment which only makes things worse. They get into repeated arguments about finances and the mother's failed love life. The entire movie is a battle of wills between the mother and daughter. Only after the daughter learns to accept her mother's ways is there peace.
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