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The Archive & the Repertoire-P Paperback – Sep 12 2003

5.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Duke Univ Pr (Tx) (Sept. 12 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0822331233
  • ISBN-13: 978-0822331230
  • Product Dimensions: 15.1 x 1.9 x 23 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 454 g
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #82,567 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

Review

"Persuasively argued and elegantly theorized, The Archive and the Repertoire constitutes a necessary intervention in performance scholarship."
--Lisa Wolford Wylam," Theatre Research International"

"[A] timely collection of essays. . . .Taylor weaves together insights, examples, and critical strategies from [performance studies and Latina/o American studies] and her exemplary book makes a major contribution to both."
--Marvin Carlson, "TDR: The Drama Review"

"[E]xcellent. . . . Both in its impressive range, . . . and in its insistence on exploring non-dominant forms of processing experience, Taylor's book is a crucial contribution to the emerging cartographies of global Latin/o American cultures."
--Juan Poblette, "The Americas"

"Taylor's work is an important step in acknowledging marginalized expressions of cultural memory. Its most notable contribution is undoubtedly a defense of the growing field of performance studies as a tool of decolonization."
--Katherine M. Hedeen, "Latin American Research Review"

"[O]ne of the most wide-ranging studies of performance in and of the Americas today. Taylor has masterfully brought together, in a work that is an act of performance itself, both the contradictions and the possibilities of performance studies and the histories and trajectories of Latin/o American hemispheric studies into a 'loosely structured arrangement.'"
--Alberto Guevara," Canadian Journal of Latin American & Caribbean Studies"

"The book is itself both a performance and a contribution to the archive. The remarkably effective way in which [Taylor] combines personal story with analytic reflection is a fitting demonstration of the usefulness that can result from being able to sustain an awareness of one's spatio-temporal role as an observer even as one gets lost in the findings of archival discovery."
--Dianna Niebylski," Arizona Journal of Hispanic Cultural Studies"

"While I am trained to appreciate Taylor's analyses of Latino/a theatre and performance, I was most moved and surprised by her discussion of September 11 in chapter 9. As Taylor shows, the abundance of media attention and commentary produced after the destruction of the Twin Towers obscured the lives of nonheroes and nonvictims and turned all of them into spectators. Her testimony as scholar and participant in the events surrounding the attack is enlightening, but also refreshing."
--Margo Milleret, "Theatre Journal"

"Diana Taylor is that rare scholar--a master of theory who speaks from experience and writes with passion. She tells us that as a child she 'learned that the Americas were one.' In this extraordinary book Taylor explores--from the pre-Columbian to the postmodern--America's oneness of contradictions, revelations, wounds, celebrations, rituals, and arts."--Richard Schechner, University Professor of Performance Studies, Tisch School of the Arts, New York University, and author of "Performance Studies: An Introduction"

"Diana Taylor's ideas, carefully etched out here to great effect, provide a new vocabulary to understand the work that performance does in culture and broadens our sense of how performance achieves its effect. Full of insight and information, "The Archive and the Repertoire" should finally unsettle the hegemony of narrative in Latin American literary and cultural studies."--David Roman, author of "Acts of Intervention: Performance, Gay Culture, and AIDS"

"Diana Taylor is perhaps the most lucid and original Latin American performance theorist. In her new book, she tackles a very complex topic: the relationship between writing, performance, and historical memory on our continent. Her interdisciplinary approach provides us with new bridges and pathways between cultures, metiers, and disciplines. My colleagues and I have long been waiting for such a book."--Guillermo GOmez-PeNa, performance artist and writer

Diana Taylor is that rare scholar a master of theory who speaks from experience and writes with passion. She tells us that as a child she learned that the Americas were one. In this extraordinary book Taylor explores from the pre-Columbian to the postmodern America s oneness of contradictions, revelations, wounds, celebrations, rituals, and arts. Richard Schechner, University Professor of Performance Studies, Tisch School of the Arts, New York University, and author of "Performance Studies: An Introduction""

Diana Taylor s ideas, carefully etched out here to great effect, provide a new vocabulary to understand the work that performance does in culture and broadens our sense of how performance achieves its effect. Full of insight and information, "The Archive and the Repertoire" should finally unsettle the hegemony of narrative in Latin American literary and cultural studies. David Roman, author of "Acts of Intervention: Performance, Gay Culture, and AIDS""

" The Archive and the Repertoire" is an original and brilliant contribution. It will take the study of Latin American performance to a new level with its attention not only to politics and to history and its consequences, but also to memory, the media, and aesthetic/political practices that take into account the hemispheric and the global. Yvonne Yarbro-Bejarano, author of "The Wounded Heart: Writing on Cherrie Moraga""

From the Back Cover

""The Archive and the Repertoire" is an original and brilliant contribution. It will take the study of Latin American performance to a new level with its attention not only to politics and to history and its consequences, but also to memory, the media, and aesthetic/political practices that take into account the hemispheric and the global."--Yvonne Yarbro-Bejarano, author of "The Wounded Heart: Writing on Cherrie Moraga"

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Format: Paperback
In her wonderful new book, Diana Taylor, a distinguished professor of both Spanish and performance studies, brings her areas of expertise into "conversation." Performances, she argues, are vital "acts of transfer" that transmit social knowledge, memory and a sense of identity in Latin/o American (and by extension other) cultures.
She writes, "I am not suggesting that we merely extend our analytic practice to other 'Non-Western' areas. Rather, what I propose here is a real engagement between two fields that helps us rethink both." By working from the points of disconnection between area and performance studies Taylor creates a new framework for approaching performance as embodied social practice.

Shifting focus to "the live" requires new methodologies and Taylor creates exciting new theoretical tools to further this discussion. Since, in her view, much performance writing betrays the "embodiedness" it seeks to describe; Taylor coins terms that do not derive from literary sources. The repertoire of her title is her term for a "non-archival system of transfer" that can capture the ephemeral trace of performance. By providing her reader with a kind of archive of affect, Taylor makes the body central. She argues that the repertoire "allows for an alternative perspective on historical processes...by following traditions of embodied practice" instead of literary rhetoric. As an alternative to "narrative" she offers scenario, a term with a theatrical genealogy, meaning an open-ended " sketch or outline" as a way to connote colonial encounters. For example, Taylor wittily names the scenario in which we are encouraged to "overlook the displacement and disappearance of native peoples" at the root of the popular show Survivor, "Fantasy Island.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0xa0d885b8) out of 5 stars 7 reviews
16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa05cc360) out of 5 stars Read This Important New Book Dec 15 2003
By Joseph Shahadi - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
In her wonderful new book, Diana Taylor, a distinguished professor of both Spanish and performance studies, brings her areas of expertise into "conversation." Performances, she argues, are vital "acts of transfer" that transmit social knowledge, memory and a sense of identity in Latin/o American (and by extension other) cultures.
She writes, "I am not suggesting that we merely extend our analytic practice to other `Non-Western' areas. Rather, what I propose here is a real engagement between two fields that helps us rethink both." By working from the points of disconnection between area and performance studies Taylor creates a new framework for approaching performance as embodied social practice.

Shifting focus to "the live" requires new methodologies and Taylor creates exciting new theoretical tools to further this discussion. Since, in her view, much performance writing betrays the "embodiedness" it seeks to describe; Taylor coins terms that do not derive from literary sources. The repertoire of her title is her term for a "non-archival system of transfer" that can capture the ephemeral trace of performance. By providing her reader with a kind of archive of affect, Taylor makes the body central. She argues that the repertoire "allows for an alternative perspective on historical processes...by following traditions of embodied practice" instead of literary rhetoric. As an alternative to "narrative" she offers scenario, a term with a theatrical genealogy, meaning an open-ended " sketch or outline" as a way to connote colonial encounters. For example, Taylor wittily names the scenario in which we are encouraged to "overlook the displacement and disappearance of native peoples" at the root of the popular show Survivor, "Fantasy Island." Taylor expands on this theme in her second chapter, Scenarios of Discovery: Reflections on Performance and Ethnography. She writes, "Using scenario as a paradigm for understanding social structures and behaviors might allow us to draw from the repertoire as well as the archive."
Using these terms as "portable frameworks" and moving in and out of first person experience, Taylor explores a range of hemispheric performances. Chapters on the Mexican mestizaje, campy Latino American psychic Walter Mercado, and the ways that minority populations mourned Princess Diana, explore the hybrid spaces between perception and embodied culture. Taylor revisits the Argentinean "Dirty War"
(the topic of her book Disappearing Acts) in her chapter on H.I.J.O.S. -the children of the disappeared- and the "DNA of performance" that links them with their absent parents. Chapters on Brazilian performance artist Denise Stoklos, witnessing 9/11 and a 1998 Central Park performance of Rumba musicians interrupted by the NYPD, investigate the complex relations between hegemonic power and the anarchic spirit of live performance against a background of historic violence.
This book is a path-making piece of scholarship that recognizes performance as a valid focus of analysis. It creates a dialogue between area and performance studies that values the unique features of both. The questions Diana Taylor asks in Archive and the Repertoire extend beyond this work and will shape a terrain of inquiry in performance studies for years to come.
HASH(0xa05d7870) out of 5 stars Performance as embodied knowledge May 31 2014
By EuskoAmericaldun - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Great and thorough analysis of various performances, productions, and practices in Mexico, South and Central America as political engagement and embodied ways of knowing and transferring knowledge/experience. Also a critique of history and national/individual identity as archive, and as repertoire. I would highly recommend this to anyone interested in the revolutionary possibilities produced by and through bodies and creative production, particularly through a lens of post-colonial studies and performance studies.
HASH(0xa07b58c4) out of 5 stars It does it's job Sept. 13 2013
By Reshi - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Like the the headline says, it does it's job. I purchased this for a gen ed, and it gets me by. I find some of the readings very boring, but it does have some interesting things in it.
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa0631f3c) out of 5 stars A Vital Intervention Feb. 15 2006
By Christopher Van Houten - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Taylor's "The Archive and the Repertoire" is an absolute must-read for all scholars and students in performance studies, cultural studies, Latin American studies, and the social sciences in general.

Drawing on a diverse range of case studies from a Peruvian community theatre troupe to Univision astrologist Walter Mercado to her own firsthand account of witnessing 9/11, Taylor creates a new vocabulary for describing how cultures remember and re-enact with the body.

Although her insights are crucial for the future of performance studies and useful to senior scholars in the field, she writes with a clarity and personality that will engage undergraduate students as well.

VERY highly recommended.
By Danielle Kuijten - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Inspiring read.


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