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Are We Not Men? We Are Devo CD

4.7 out of 5 stars 45 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (March 1 2012)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: CD
  • Label: Warner Bros
  • ASIN: B000002KJ1
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  LP Record
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars 45 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #44,689 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)
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1. Uncontrollable Urge
2. (I Can't Get No) Satisfaction
3. Praying Hands
4. Space Junk
5. Mongoloid
6. Joko Homo
7. Too Much Paranoias
8. Gut Feeling/(Slap Your Mammy)
9. Come Back Jonee
10. Sloppy (I Saw My Baby Gettin')
11. Shrivel-Up

Product Description

Product Description

Is this not a new wave classic?! Includes Jocko Homo; Mongoloid, and Satisfaction !

Amazon.ca

When Devo's debut album came out in 1978, nobody knew what to make of the mutant new-wave quintet from Akron, Ohio. With Brian Eno's skillful production, Mark and Bob Mothersbaugh, Jerry and Bob Casale, and Alan Myers emerged fully formed and outrageous with their razor-sharp social commentary and exhibition of subversive media savvy. Beyond their industrial uniforms and pseudo-devolved demeanor, Devo also happened to be a rocking little band. Classic rave-outs like "Mongoloid," "Jocko Homo," and "Uncontrollable Urge" illustrate the band's perky-jerky intensity. On their inimitable cover of the Rolling Stones' youth anthem, "Satisfaction," Devo's avant-garde robot funk takes the song to a new level of alienation and discontent. While the band went on to greater fame, this was the only album they made that truly mattered. --Mitch Meyers

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
I love this CD. Devo's first album may be my favorite. It's starts with a great song "Uncontrollable Urge," and ends with another great song "Shrivel Up." From begining to end it is just a great Cd. The only thing I don't like is the length. It seems a little short to me. If you like Pop Rock, bands like Oingo Boingo or Talking Heads, then I think you will like Devo. This CD was so much ahead of it's time.
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Format: Audio CD
1978 was the height of the disco craze, with millions of Americans shaking their respective bootey's to such homogenized drivel as "Disco Duck." But alas, out of Akron OH came five Kent State neo-nerd types who with this one album basically called the bluff of a popular culture that was being force-fed to millions of unsuspecting spuds everywhere. Devo introduced "The sound of things falling apart," or devolution as their satiric theory as to why our "culture" seemed to be regressing backwards.
With incredible production by Brian Eno, Q: Are We Not Men/A: We Are Devo! provides a uniquely clever look at popular culture via 1978's crass commercialism that truly doesn't take itself too seriously.
With the tonge in cheek sentimentalism of "Come Back Jonie," to the over the top outrage of "Gut Feeling/Slap 'Yo Mammy," Devo rocks with a hypnotic urgency that made the New Wave movement so much fun. The listener felt that he/she was privy to someting that not everyone else new about. Also includeded is Devo's interpetation of The Stones' classic,"(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction," and of course their unofficial theme song "Jocko Homo." But what makes this CD so timeless is that Devo could rock! The runaway punk of "Uncontrolable Urge" and the energy-chocked guitar chaos of "Too Much Parinoia," make this stand up even two decades later. This album was more than a clever concept, it delivers the goods.
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Format: Audio CD
I hope you were joking when you imply Devo borrowed ideas from "Spandau Ballet, Human League, Thompson Twins and Visage." Because that's a pretty funny joke. Spandau Ballet started around 1979, Visage 1978, Human League + Thompson Twins 1977. Devo 1972 and had several bootlegs floating around prior to their first E.P. in 1977. Sorry your history is all wrong...This is a ground breaking album period.
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By A Customer on Feb. 24 2004
Format: Audio CD
Although this is their first official release the band had been around already for 6 years doing their own home recordings and a handful of brilliant strange films. The old recordings, which were put out on the sadly out of print Hardcore Devo compilations were completely brilliant, insanely bizzare and very very unique. This album marks the end of that insane streak of genius and the watering down of Devo as the music got less strange and more bland, this album isn't horrible by any means but it certainly is a tame puppy compared to the recordings that actually got them signed, worse albums were to come as the music got far more mainstream though you could never convince Devo that.
If you're new to Devo buy this album then I guess download the Hardcore Devo Vol 1 and 2 albums to hear the REAL Devo, then pretend like they died in a plane crash after those. I really hate their other stuff and hate cruddy 80s music with the similiar sound, did they really HAVE to De-evolve like they did?
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Format: Audio CD
Okay, let's flashback in time. It's 1978, the height of the disco era and one can only wonder what the future of rock and roll will hold. Then, come one seminal moment in the history of rock, one television's Saturday Night Live, these young men from Akron, Ohio come out on stage in their yellow radioactive suits and perform "I Can't Get No Satisfaction" and put a little fun back into rock and roll.
Twenty-five years later, this disc remains a classic. Devo has always been hard to sort of pigeonhole or label. Perhaps, that is why their music is just as fresh now as it was back then.
Having Brian Eno and David Bowie in the wings did not hurt at all and one can only wonder if Eno had worked with the band more in later years what sort of the direction the band could have taken.
Nonetheless, Devo has never really enjoyed the fame that they rightfully deserved, but that's okay. Maybe that is why when you listen to them now their music defies any genre labels that have been the death knell for other bands from the same era.
Hey, this is some of the zaniest music with some of the craziest lyrics you will ever hear on a disc.
But don't just take my word for it. Buy the disc, slap it on and have yourself an enjoyable "devo" moment.
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Format: Audio CD
I bought this album with a friend one day, in one of those huge corporate electronics stores. I picked it up immedietely, having heard the greatness of "Jocko Homo" and "Satisfaction" before. My friend looked at the album in my hands, and said the following thing:
"Hah, they had that song 'Whip It,' didn't they?" Immediately afterwards he rolled his eyes. Hmph.
Why Devo is so dismissed as an eighties novelty band is lost on me. Heck, I even like "Whip It" for it's musical qualities. But would you catch me saying that to anyone anymore? No way. I'd get the same response every time.
Sad that those idiots will never listen to this amazing, one-of-a-kind album. "Q: Are We Not Men? A: We Are Devo!" is musically flawless, a combonation of the aggressive post-punk feel with a little (but thankfully, not too much) new wave mixed in. The result is pleasing to the ears and very danceable. Just my kind of music.
I love every single song on this album; I fear that if I began to name off my favorites, I'd list the whole album.
So, I'll just list my top favorites as of right now: there's the wonderful, sort of creepy masterpiece "Shrivel Up," a song with a catchy melody (the kind that will stick in your head for a long time) and odd, kooky lyrics. There's also the near-instrumental "Gut Feeling/Slap Your Mammy," featuring almost two and a half minutes of nothing but amazing music (with a piano thrown in for good measure). "Sloppy (I Saw My Baby Gettin')" has one of the weirdest and catchiest choruses anywhere.
Oh, if only I had the time to name of the merits of each song on here. Seriously, every single song counts. You'll be liking "Come Back Jonee" as much as the classic "Jocko Homo." Although it may take a couple listens to truly get into the vibe of this album, it's well worth it.
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