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The BFG Audio CD – Audiobook, Unabridged

4.7 out of 5 stars 230 customer reviews

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Harry Potter and the Cursed Child
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Product Details

  • Audio CD: 1 pages
  • Publisher: Listening Library (Audio); Unabridged edition (July 3 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1611761883
  • ISBN-13: 978-1611761887
  • Product Dimensions: 13.2 x 2 x 14.5 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 113 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars 230 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,665,203 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

The Witching Hour
 
Sophie couldn't sleep.
 
A brilliant moonbeam was slanting through a gap in the curtains. It was shining right on to her pillow.
 
The other children in the dormitory had been asleep for hours.
 
Sophie closed her eyes and lay quite still. She tried very hard to doze off.
 
It was no good. The moonbeam was like a silver blade slicing through the room onto her face.
 
The house was absolutely silent. No voices came up from downstairs. There were no footsteps on the floor above either.
 
The window behind the curtain was wide open, but nobody was walking on the pavement outside. No cars went by on the street. Not the tiniest sound could be heard anywhere. Sophie had never known such a silence.
 
Perhaps, she told herself, this was what they called the witching hour.
 
The witching hour, somebody had once whispered to her, was a special moment in the middle of the night when every child and every grown-up was in a deep deep sleep, and all the dark things came out from hiding and had the world to themselves.
 
***
 
The moonbeam was brighter than ever on Sophie's pillow. She decided to get out of bed and close the gap in the curtains.
 
You got punished if you were caught out of bed after lights-out. Even if you said you had to go to the lavatory, that was not accepted as an excuse and they punished you just the same. But there was no one about now, Sophie was sure of that.
 
She reached out for her glasses that lay on the chair beside her bed. They had steel rims and very thick lenses, and she could hardly see a thing without them. She put them on, then she slipped out of bed and tiptoed over to the window.
 
When she reached the curtains, Sophie hesitated. She longed to duck underneath them and lean out of the window to see what the world looked like now that the witching hour was at hand.
 
She listened again. Everywhere it was deathly still.
 
The longing to look out became so strong she couldn't resist it. Quickly, she ducked under the curtains and leaned out of the window.
 
In the silvery moonlight, the village street she knew so well seemed completely different. The houses looked bent and crooked, like houses in a fairy tale. Everything was pale and ghostly and milky-white.
 
Across the road, she could see Mrs Rance's shop, where you bought buttons and wool and bits of elastic. It didn't look real. There was something dim and misty about that too.
 
Sophie allowed her eye to travel further and further down the street.
 
Suddenly she froze. There was something coming up the street on the opposite side.
 
It was something black . . .
 
Something tall and black . . .
 
Something very tall and very black and very thin.
 
Who?

It wasn't a human. It couldn't be. It was four times as tall as the tallest human. It was so tall its head was higher than the upstairs windows of the houses. Sophie opened her mouth to scream, but no sound came out. Her throat, like her whole body, was frozen with fright.
 
This was the witching hour all right.
 
The tall black figure was coming her way. It was keeping very close to the houses across the street, hiding in the shadowy places where there was no moonlight.
 
On and on it came, nearer and nearer. But it was moving in spurts. It would stop, then it would move on, then it would stop again.
 
But what on earth was it doing?
 
Ah-ha! Sophie could see now what it was up to. It was stopping in front of each house. It would stop and peer into the upstairs window of each house in the street. It actually had to bend down to peer into the upstairs windows. That's how tall it was.
 
It would stop and peer in. Then it would slide on to the next house and stop again, and peer in, and so on all along the street.
 
It was much closer now and Sophie could see it more clearly.
 
Looking at it carefully, she decided it had to be some kind of PERSON. Obviously it was not a human. But it was definitely a PERSON.
 
A GIANT PERSON, perhaps.
 
Sophie stared hard across the misty moonlit street. The Giant (if that was what he was) was wearing a long BLACK CLOAK.
 
In one hand he was holding what looked like a VERY LONG, THIN TRUMPET.
 
In the other hand, he held a LARGE SUITCASE.
 
The Giant had stopped now right in front of Mr and Mrs Goochey's house. The Goocheys had a greengrocer's shop in the middle of the High Street, and the family lived above the shop. The two Goochey children slept in the upstairs front room, Sophie knew that.
 
The Giant was peering through the window into the room where Michael and Jane Goochey were sleeping. From across the street, Sophie watched and held her breath.
 
***
 
She saw the Giant step back a pace and put the suitcase down on the pavement. He bent over and opened the suitcase. He took something out of it. It looked like a glass jar, one of those square ones with a screw top. He unscrewed the top of the jar and poured what was in it into the end of the long trumpet thing.
 
Sophie watched, trembling.
 
She saw the Giant straighten up again and she saw him poke the trumpet in through the open upstairs window of the room where the Coochey children were sleeping. She saw the Giant take a deep breath and whoof, he blew through the trumpet.
 
No noise came out, but it was obvious to Sophie that whatever had been in the jar had now been blown through the trumpet into the Coochey children's bedroom.
 
What could it be?
 
As the Giant withdrew the trumpet from the window and bent down to pick up the suitcase, he happened to turn his head and glance across the street.
 
In the moonlight, Sophie caught a glimpse of an enormous long pale wrinkly face with huge ears. The nose was as sharp as a knife, and above the nose there were two bright flashing eyes, and the eyes were staring straight at Sophie. There was a fierce and devilish look about them.
 
Sophie gave a yelp and pulled back from the window. She flew across the dormitory and jumped into her bed and hid under the blanket.
 
And there she crouched, still as a mouse, and tingling all over.
 
The Snatch
 
Under the blanket, Sophie waited.
 
After a minute or so, she lifted a corner of the blanket and peeped out.
 
For the second time that night her blood froze to ice and she wanted to scream, but no sound came out. There at the window, with the curtains pushed aside, was the enormous long pale wrinkly face of the Giant Person, staring in. The flashing black eyes were fixed on Sophie's bed.
 
The next moment, a huge hand with pale fingers came snaking in through the window. This was followed by an arm, an arm as thick as a tree-trunk, and the arm, the hand, the fingers were reaching out across the room towards Sophie's bed.
 
 
This time Sophie really did scream, but only for a second because very quickly the huge hand clamped down over her blanket and the scream was smothered by the bedclothes.
 
Sophie, crouching underneath the blanket, felt strong fingers grasping hold of her, and then she was lifted up from her bed, blanket and all, and whisked out of the window.
 
***
 
If you can think of anything more terrifying than that happening to you in the middle of the night, then let's hear about it.
 
The awful thing was that Sophie knew exactly what was going on although she couldn't see it happening. She knew that a Monster (or Giant) with an enormous long pale wrinkly face and dangerous eyes had plucked her from her bed in the middle of the witching hour and was now carrying her out through the window smothered in a blanket.
 
What actually happened next was this. When the Giant had got Sophie outside, he arranged the blanket so that he could grasp all the four corners of it at once in one of his huge hands, with Sophie imprisoned inside. In the other hand he seized the suitcase and the long trumpet thing and off he ran.
 
***
 
Sophie, by squirming around inside the blanket, managed to push the top of her head out through a little gap just below the Giant's hand. She stared around her.
 
She saw the village houses rushing by on both sides. The Giant was sprinting down the High Street. He was running so fast his black cloak was streaming out behind him like the wings of a bird. Each stride he took was as long as a tennis court. Out of the village he ran, and soon they were racing across the moonlit fields. The hedges dividing the fields were no problem to the Giant. He simply strode over them. A wide river appeared in his path. He crossed it in one flying stride.
 
Sophie crouched in the blanket, peering out. She was being bumped against the Giant's leg like a sack of potatoes. Over the fields and hedges and rivers they went, and after a while a frightening thought carne into Sophie's head. The Giant is running fast, she told herself, because he is hungry and he wants to get home as quickly as possible, and then he'll have me for breakfast.

About the Author

Roald Dahl (1916-1990) was born in Wales of Norwegian parents. He spent his childhood in England and, at age eighteen, went to work for the Shell Oil Company in Africa. When World War II broke out, he joined the Royal Air Force and became a fighter pilot. At the age of twenty-six he moved to Washington, D.C., and it was there he began to write. His first short story, which recounted his adventures in the war, was bought by The Saturday Evening Post, and so began a long and illustrious career.

After establishing himself as a writer for adults, Roald Dahl began writing children’s stories in 1960 while living in England with his family. His first stories were written as entertainment for his own children, to whom many of his books are dedicated.

Roald Dahl is now considered one of the most beloved storytellers of our time. Although he passed away in 1990, his popularity continues to increase as his fantastic novels, including James and the Giant PeachMatildaThe BFG, and Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, delight an ever-growing legion of fans.

Learn more about Roald Dahl on the official Roald Dahl Web site: www.roalddahl.com

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Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Tim Maddux
October 16, 2001
Amazon Review
The BFG
Roald Dahl
Roald Dahl's The BFG tells the story of two opposites coming together, becoming friends, and coming up with an idea to save others. The Big Friendly Giant snatches Sophie, a little English girl, from her window, during the witching hour. Sophie and the Giant venture off to Giant Country, where she learns of the other "human bean"-- eating giants and the true personality of the Big Friendly Giant. The two learn many things about each other and devise a way to save the humans of the world from being eaten by the nine other giants. The Big Friendly Giant and Sophie work well with and learn a lot from each other.
The BFG conveys the important themes of friendship, understanding, and humorous imagination. Readers of any age can appreciate the book. The BFG is heart-warming, yet downright funny!
Roald Dahl's book has been banned because some people feel that it is too mature for a young audience. Many believe the book teaches poor moral values. However, the words, along with the illustrations, in the book can stir any reader's curiosity. The uneducated language of the Big Friendly Giant makes the book more child-friendly too. The BFG also teaches readers a positive message. In the latter part of the story, the queen tells her army not to kill the nine "human bean"-eating giants when they propose the idea. The army generals believe that the murderous giants should be slain. The queen responds with a strong moral statement when she says that killing the giants would be wrong. This part of the story sends a tremendously positive moral statement. I disagree with those who feel that The BFG should be a banned book. The BFG is one of the best children's books I have ever read.
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By Gail Cooke TOP 100 REVIEWER on March 15 2006
Format: Audio CD
Couldn't wait to write a rave review of this splendidly enjoyable audio book but AudioFile Magazine beat me to it. Their editors wrote: "In a perfect combination of plot and narration, Natasha Richardson has created a splendid rendition of a true children's classic."
In other words, she's wonderful!
Richardson took home a Tony award for her spectacular Broadway turn in Cabaret, and won a Tony nomination for her debut in Anna Christie. Film credits? Beaucoup. The Parent Trap, A Month in the Country, The Handmaid's Tale and The Comfort of Strangers.
There's no questioning her acting chops and she brings all to the fore in this stunning delivery of a beloved children's classic.
As many may remember, Sophie is an orphan who is amazed to discover that giants actually do exist. Not only that but some of them are very mean, so cruel that they "like to guzzle and swallomp nice little chiddlers."
However, there is an exception - the BFG (Big Friendly Giant). He's such a good guy that he and Sophie pair up to rid the world of the mean "troggle-humping giants." Why, the BFG is so nice that all he can eat is snozzcumbers, better known as really bad food. (No wonder Roald Dahl holds such an appeal for kids!)
So determined are Sophie and the BFG that they even ask the Queen of England to help them dispense with the kid quaffing big ones.
The BFG as read by Natasha Richardson is pure pleasure to be enjoyed over and over again.
- Gail Cooke
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By Julie on March 18 2004
Format: Paperback
The BFG
By: Roald Dahl
Reviewed by J. Yeh
Period: P.1
The BFG, written by Roald Dahl is about a young orphan who met a giant called the Big Friendly Giant. One night the orphan named Sophie couldn't sleep and out the window she saw an outline of something big. She saw it blow things into the windows with a trumpet. Sophie ran back to her bed and hid under her blanket. Next thing she knew when she peeped out was that a hand snatched her from the bed out of the window. Inside his hand was Sophia watching everything past her while the giant ran fast. They got to the cave where he lived and the giant set Sophie on the table. The BFG told her everything like why she was taken and his life. A giant bigger than the BFG came in and thought there was someone in the cave because the BFG was talking to Sophie. Sophie hid in what the giant calls snozzcumbers. The enormous giant went around searching for the human being but couldn't find her, and soon left. The BFG took Sophie to the Dream Country where the giant caught all his dreams. He didn't like the nightmare dreams and got really mad when he caught one. He caught a nightmare and left the country. He blew the dream into another giant. Suddenly the giant started squirming around and screamming. After a while all the giants got into a big quarrel. The BFG showed Sophie all his dreams he had caught and she read the labels written on them. There were dreams for girls and boys. Sophie thought of an idea of how to get rid of the other giants. So the BFG mixed the dreams for the queen to have about all the giants gobbling up human beings. They took a while to mix it and in the night while the other giants were gone, they blew the dream into the queen's bedroom. She woke up thinking that it was only a dream.
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