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Back to the Future: The Complete Trilogy (Widescreen, 3 Discs) [Import]

4.6 out of 5 stars 531 customer reviews

Price: CDN$ 63.97
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Frequently Bought Together

  • Back to the Future: The Complete Trilogy (Widescreen, 3 Discs) [Import]
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  • E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial: 30th Anniversary Edition
Total price: CDN$ 73.97
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Product Details

  • Actors: Michael J. Fox, Christopher Lloyd, Lea Thompson, Mary Steenburgen, Crispin Glover
  • Directors: Laurent Bouzereau, Robert Zemeckis
  • Writers: Laurent Bouzereau, Robert Zemeckis, Bob Gale
  • Producers: Bob Gale, Frank Marshall, Kathleen Kennedy
  • Format: Anamorphic, Box set, Closed-captioned, Color, Dolby, DTS Surround Sound, DVD-Video, Subtitled, Widescreen, NTSC, Import
  • Language: English, French
  • Subtitles: Spanish
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada This DVD will probably NOT be viewable in other countries. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 3
  • MPAA Rating: PG
  • Studio: Universal Music Group
  • Release Date: Dec 17 2002
  • Run Time: 342 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars 531 customer reviews
  • ASIN: B00006AL1E
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Product Description

Product Description

Back To The Future: The Complet

Amazon.ca

Filmmaker Robert Zemeckis topped his breakaway hit Romancing the Stone with Back to the Future, a joyous comedy with a dazzling hook: what would it be like to meet your parents in their youth? Billed as a special-effects comedy, the imaginative film (the top box-office smash of 1985) has staying power because of the heart behind Zemeckis and Bob Gale's script. High schooler Marty McFly (Michael J. Fox, during the height of his TV success) is catapulted back to the '50s where he sees his parents in their teens, and accidentally changes the history of how Mom and Dad met. Filled with the humorous ideology of the '50s, filtered through the knowledge of the '80s (actor Ronald Reagan is president, ha!), the film comes off as a Twilight Zone episode written by Preston Sturges. Filled with memorable effects and two wonderfully off-key, perfectly cast performances: Christopher Lloyd as the crazy scientist who builds the time machine (a DeLorean luxury car) and Crispin Glover as Marty's geeky dad. --Doug Thomas

Critics and audiences didn't seem too happy with Back to the Future, Part II, the inventive, perhaps too clever sequel. Director Zemeckis and cast bent over backwards to add layers of time-travel complication, and while it surely exercises the brain it isn't necessarily funny in the same way that its predecessor was. It's well worth a visit, though, just to appreciate the imagination that went into it, particularly in a finale that has Marty watching his own actions from the first film. --Tom Keogh

Shot back-to-back with the second chapter in the trilogy, Back to the Future, Part III is less hectic than that film and has the same sweet spirit of the first, albeit in a whole new setting. This time, Marty ends up in the Old West of 1885, trying to prevent the death of mad scientist Christopher Lloyd at the hands of gunman Buford "Mad Dog" Tannen (Thomas F. Wilson, who had a recurring role as the bully Biff). Director Zemeckis successfully blends exciting special effects with the traditions of a Western and comes up with something original and fun. --Tom Keogh

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By LeBrain HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on Dec 29 2010
Format: Blu-ray
This blu-ray box set passed my criteria for "movies I am willing to buy again" for a number of reasons. The main reason was that the apsect ratio problems from the previous DVD box set have been corrected. That alone made this worth buying. The wealth of new bonus features, in addition to many old featurettes, was the second valid reason.

I watched all three movies plus a smattering of bonus features over the course of the holidays. People, let me tell you something. As crappy as the second movie is, it's much more enjoyable if you watch all three movies in one marathon session. Despite the recasting of Jennifer, the three movies meld together as one like very few other series. Connections not immediately obvious become apparent. Plus, you can't get from 1 to 3 without watching 2.

The 5.1 surround sound was excellent, and the 1080p picture simply great. What is also great is that a lot of the cheesier special effects (particularly makeup) were not ruined by 1080p. The illusions still hold.

As mentioned, the bonus features are ample. There are new featurettes and interviews to go with this 25th anniversary edition, as well as the older ones. There is also the previously seen footage of Eric Stoltz as Marty McFly, enlightening as it is. One thing I haven't gotten around to yet is the "u control" feature.

I am really glad I got this set. I re-gifted my old DVDs to an uncle who doesn't care about aspect rations and was just plain glad to have these awesome movies.

5 stars.
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Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
I am reviewing the 30th anniversary blu ray pack, canadian release.

Anyone reading this should already know what to expect from the films, so I'm reviewing just this release in terms of content and what is physically provided.

The case is physically better than the 25th anniversary edition, but the discs are lazy blue-on-silver silkscreened. Not the full colour silkscreen like the 25th edition, and the international version (of this release). The case uses the increasingly popular cardboard slide in disc holders.. I have many releases with this type of case and while I haven't had any damage from it yet, it still doesn't feel right sliding a disc against a piece of cardboard.

The bonus content is nice, and has a couple of newly filmed skits that I thought were very cool.

Since the TV series was so mediocre I chose to simply go for the movies, and it seems to be a good choice, the packaging on the big bundle isn't worth the extra money at all.

This is a great release and brings together three of the best time traveling movies of all time, in a very nice package.
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Format: DVD
Without a doubt, this is the best live-action film trilogy of all time (pun intended). When the first movie came out I actually didn't like it. At the time it just seemed like another crude '80s teen comedy to me. But the Part II changed all that. Here was thoughtful science-fiction--a clever exercise in time travel theory that the first film only touched on briefly in the last few minutes. And by revisiting the events of the first film so creatively, Part II made me love Part I ... which is the cleverest part of all! Part III rounded out the trilogy nicely but I remember sitting in the theater feeling immensely sad the ride was over just as I was getting into it. But thanks to these DVDs I can relive the fun and adventure over and over again.

This is a nice DVD collection. It has all the extras from previously released sets but most importantly it has a quality transfer of the films themselves. The two versions of the 20th anniversary collection were plagued with framing then color issues (on the second and third films, respectively). FINALLY I've got a great quality version of my favorite time travel trilogy!
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Format: DVD
How can you go wrong with Back to the Future. This is simply one of the best trilogy that exist. I know some people complain about the fake widescreen. I don't know if the problem was corrected or not, but even on a 16x9 screen, you won't notice it. English and French audio track for all three movies and MANY extras for you to learn even more about each of the three movies. A must buy.
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Format: DVD
I read somebody else's review from December 2002 about how there were errors on discs 2 and 3, that they weren't really widescreen. I did a little more research and found this information on dvdtown's site:
The most controversial part of the video concerns the framing of the image for widescreen viewing. When Universal went back to the full-frame, open-matte negatives to do the DVDs, they made some changes, intentional or not, from the laser disc framing. Then they issued an official press release as follows: "Universal Studios Home Video is aware of a minor technical framing issue on the 'Back to the Future Trilogy' widescreen DVDs. The framing appears differently from the laserdisc releases for approximately two minutes during 'Back to the Future II' and four minutes during 'Back to the Future III.' The framing difference is unnoticeable to widescreen DVD viewers and does not detract from or interrupt the viewing experience. Consumers with further questions can call (888) 703-0010."
The studio is probably right in saying that the differences are unnoticeable (whether they meant "widescreen" or "full screen" or whatever), because unless a viewer has a photographic memory of the theatrical versions or has the laser discs on hand for direct comparison, there is little to notice. It's doubtful that anyone but the most meticulous "Back to the Future" partisan need worry about any possible framing problems.
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