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Batman: The Movie (1966)

4.3 out of 5 stars 131 customer reviews

Price: CDN$ 29.99
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Product Details

  • Actors: Adam West, Burt Ward, Lee Meriwether, Cesar Romero, Burgess Meredith
  • Directors: Leslie H. Martinson
  • Writers: Bill Finger, Bob Kane, Dick Sprang, Edmond Hamilton, Jerry Robinson
  • Format: Color, DVD-Video, NTSC, Widescreen
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada This DVD will probably NOT be viewable in other countries. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: PG
  • Studio: 20th Century Fox Home Entertainment
  • Release Date: July 1 2008
  • Run Time: 105 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars 131 customer reviews
  • ASIN: B0016MOWPA
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #15,315 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)
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Product Description

Product Description

Bonus features: audio commentary by adam West & Burt Ward Tour of the batmobile Batman Featurette Still gallery theatrical trailer & teaser

Amazon.ca

Holy camp site, Batman! After a fabulously successful season on TV, the campy comic book adventure hit the big screen, complete with painful puns, outrageous supervillains, and fights punctuated with word balloons sporting such onomatopoeic syllables as "Pow!," "Thud!," and "Blammo!" Adam West's wooden Batman is the cowled vigilante alter ego of straight-arrow millionaire Bruce Wayne and Bruce Ward's Robin (a.k.a. Dick Grayson, Bruce's young collegiate protégé) his overeager sidekick in hot pants. Together they battle an unholy alliance of Gotham City's greatest criminals: the Joker (Cesar Romero, whooping up a storm), the Riddler (giggling Frank Gorshin), the Penguin (cackling Burgess Meredith), and the purr-fectly sexy Catwoman (Lee Meriwether slinking in a skin-tight black bodysuit). The criminals are, naturally, out to conquer the world, but with a little help from their unending supply of utility belt devices (bat shark repellent, anyone?), our dynamic duo thwarts their nefarious plans at every turn. Since the TV show ran under 30 minutes an episode (with commercials), the 105-minute film runs a little thin--a little camp goes a long way--but fans of the small-screen show will enjoy the spoofing tone throughout. Leslie H. Martinson directs Lorenzo Semple's screenplay like a big-budget TV episode minus the cliffhanger endings. --Sean Axmaker --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
One of the high points of this movie for me is the scene in which Bruce Wayne mops up a group of bad guys with his hands tied together. No "Pows," "Bams," or "Zowees" here, just a well-choreographed fight that's better than any in the series, and certainly better than in any of Sean Connery's Bond films. Released in the summer of '66 in order to sell the show overseas, Batman: The Movie represents the best elements of the series. All the major villains were represented (Julie Newmar wasn't available to reprise her role as Catwoman, though Lee Meriwether does a good if not better job), the many bat-vehicles were present, and the script was at its lampooning and satirical best. Particularly good is the scene where the UN leaders are all "mixed up." The statement Batman makes at the end is apt and insightful, and that's what makes this version of Batman a like it or not affair: either one is willing to look past all the "silliness" and find the kernel of wisdom within ... or not.

And as Adam West's has said: "This wasn't the Dark Knight; it was the Bright Knight." In stark contrast, DC movies today are grim, dark, and pessimistic. It's their "brand." Ostensibly it's done in an effort to look somehow relevant or realistic. But for all their atmospheric posing, bloated histrionics, and utter pretentiousness, inside remains a hollow, vacuous falseness. Thankfully more and more people are rejecting this cynical message of defeat in their entertainment in favor of films with more hope, optimism, and fun. Maybe West's Batman went a little too far in its light treatment of the character, but the fact remains it saved the character from cancellation and kept DC comics from going under. Marvel Comics was outcompeting them in the comic business then, just as they are beating them in the movie business today, and it's no secret why.
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Format: DVD
I think a few of the above reviews are really missing the point regarding Batman - The Movie. Is it campy? Of course it is! Is it cheap? Yes! Why were these particular people cast? If you don't know, read on and learn.
Batman, starring Adam West and Burt Ward, was a TV series which ran for like 3 years, twice a week, from 1966 to 1968. After the 1st pretty successful season on American TV, a movie was produced, using the same actors, screenwriters, sets, music, etc. The reason the movie was made was to pre-sell the TV series to the European market. They wanted to make a feature length movie using the same talent and if the movie did well in Europe, they'd be able to sell the series. That's the whole reason this movie was made. Obviously, the producers couldn't make the movie using other actors, cars, etc. It had to fit into the existing very campy, very funny TV series.
The movie is slow at times, the acting IS over the top (most all TV acting was over the top in the 60s and 70s), the plot silly. None of this stuff really matters, because of (and one reviewer has already pointed this out) the sincerity of Adam West and Burt Ward in their roles as the Caped Crusaders. This isn't something they do to keep from spending time with Aunt Harriet. This was deadly serious to them and they showed it. To me the funniest sequence in the movie is the scene where Batman is trying to get a cartoon-type bomb away from various groups of wandering people before the bomb blows up. He runs all around the docks where the scene is set, holding what is obviously a prop bomb with a sparkler attached to it for a burning fuse. He runs to this side of the dock, there's a small group of Salvation Army people, to that side, young lovers, or a family of ducks in the water, etc.
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Format: Blu-ray
Atomic batteries to power. Turbines to speed!

The dynamic duo, Batman and Robin, hit the big screen in this 1960s action/adventure camp-stravaganza!

When the caped crusaders’s most dangerous foes—Joker, Riddler, Catwoman, Penquin—team up and plot to dehydrate the United Nations Security Council, Batman and Robin find themselves in over their heads and must pull out all the stops to put an end to the evil villains’ dastardly plans in this big screen adaptation of the hit TV series.

This movie rocks! And here’s why:

It’s fast-paced, exciting, and is the definition of superhero fun. What? You mean superheroes can be fun? Of course! Remember dressing up as a kid and flying around the house as Superman or climbing the stairs as Spider-Man or swinging from room to room as Batman? Remember laying waste to all those imaginary villains while also saving the damsel in distress and trying to ignore your parents when they called you for dinner? That was superhero fun. Easy-going, super adventure.

This film is the same thing . . . but with grownups. Of course, it’s also a giant Batman TV episode complete with such goodies as the animated THOKs and POWs bursting across the screen, crazy bat-gadgets for every occasion (i.e. the [in]famous bat-shark repellent), a host of bat-vehicles, and goofy special effects that work well in the context of the movie.

What’s brilliant about this Batman movie are the jokes. First, it’s meant to be silly and funny, but the humor is both overt and subtle, whether it’s the dialogue, facial expressions or even actions in some cases. It’s also amazing that despite it being purposely campy, Adam West and Burt Ward—Batman and Robin, respectively—played their characters straight.
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