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Black Lives Matter: From Holocaust to Lynching to Liberation by [Baker, Thomas Jerome]
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Black Lives Matter: From Holocaust to Lynching to Liberation Kindle Edition

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Length: 101 pages Word Wise: Enabled

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Carter G. Woodson, in “The Mis-Education of the Negro” (1933), contends that African Americans have been educated away from their own culture and traditions and attached to the fringes of European culture; thus dislocated from themselves. He asserts that African Americans often valorize European culture to the detriment of our own heritage (p. 7). Although he does not advocate rejection of American citizenship or nationality, he believed that assuming African Americans hold the same position as European Americans vis-à-vis the realities of America would lead to the psychological and cultural death of the African American population.

Furthermore, if education is ever to be substantive and meaningful within the context of American society, Woodson argues, it must first address the African’s historical experiences, both in Africa and America (p. 7). In this book, I respond to Woodson’s call to action by tracing out a self-selected, historical “Middle Passage” that will carry me from the African Holocaust to Liberation. In this way, I validate my own cultural heritage by creating a meaningful narrative, from the days of the African Holocaust, to lynching in the days of the Jim Crow South, and ultimately to liberation of the spirit and of the soul. The journey is a fascinating one. As Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. so eloquently put it, "Darkness can not drive out darkness, only light can do that. Hate can not drive out hate, only love can do that."

In doing so, we consciously affirm that black lives matter. No black life is expendable, not in the days of the Middle Passage, not in the days of Willie Lynch and Lynch-law, not in the days of overt racism, racial profiling, or even at low levels of covert racial microaggression.

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  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1419 KB
  • Print Length: 101 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00TWGBZZC
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
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  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars 20 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #469,486 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Format: Kindle Edition
The "unhappy black race" is how African Americans were described by Supreme Court Justice Taney in his infamous Dred Scott decision. According to Taney, no black, free or slave, had any constitutional rights. Taney said that the phrase, "All men are created equal" did not apply to blacks. The unhappy black race was "inferior, unfit to associate with whites, and doomed to slavery."

This book by Thomas Jerome Baker makes it undisputably clear that the mistreatment of African Americans has been one neverending, horrible and disgraceful story. In my honorable opinion, this book is a must read because denial of the African American Holocaust can only happen if we forget the lessons of history. We must never forget our past history if we are going to build a better future for all the people of the world.
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Is the African American Holocaust over yet? Some say yes, of course. Look at President Obama, look at Oprah Winfrey and look at __________ you fill in the blank. Others say go look in the jails and prisons of America. This book is a look back at historical suffering, pain, death and deception. When you look at the present, is there cause for hope for a better future? Mass incarceration of African Americans is the modern Holocaust because 60% of prisoners in the USA are African American but they only make up 13% of the population. You don't need to physically lynch a man if you can legally lynch him. Former inmates will be discriminated against, legally, for the rest of their lives, denied employment, housing, education, and public benefits. That also includes voting rights, so quite possibly, voting for Obama may be the last time a former inmate may get to cast a vote for any politician, black or white. This book helps readers understand that something must be done, and soon, to stop the ongoing African American Holocaust in the USA.
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Since the advent of Carter G. Woodson's “The Mis-Education of the Negro” (1933), which contended then that African Americans are educated away from their cultural traditions and toward European culture and in so doing, become neither fish nor fowl. Woodson believed in the value of American citizenship for people of all colors, primarily since America is a great experiment embracing all cultures. Moreover, Woodson correctly described African Americans of his day as valuing European culture over their own. Woodson, however, never advocate rejection of American citizenship or nationality. A wiser man than may, he he believed African Americans could be equal to European Americans, were the United Sates of American to fulfill its promises to all. He rejected the notion that Americanization would cause the psychological and cultural death of its African Americans. And so far, Woodson has been proved correct.

Enter Thomas Jerome Baker. Baker, building on Woodson and writing nearly some 80 years later, analyzes and expands on Woodson's vision: showing us the recent history of of Africans: a “Middle Passage: from African Holocaust to Liberation.". Using his own cultural heritage, educator Thomas Jerome Baker creates a culturally compelling narrative that takes the reader from the African equivalent of the Jewish Holocaust, through lynchings in the American South, and ultimately toward liberation of the Afro-American spirit, a fascinating journey.
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This is one of the deepest and profoundly well written books about African American history that I have read in a long time. It talks about how the Dutch were the ones to bring the first slaves to the colony of Virginia. There were 20 slaves in that first boat. Then there is the horror of the Middle Passage. It was so common for slaves to either jump overboard or get thrown overboard because of sickness or death that sharks used to trail the boats across the ocean from Africa to the USA. And then comes Willie Lynch, Charles Lynch and after the Civil War, Lynch-law. Oh, on which day did the slaves get their freedom? It wasn't magic, like New Years or something. If you were living in Texas, the news of your freedom got to you 18 months after the others. I'm sure you have heard of the Amistad, but was it really like they showed it in the movie? This book will let you compare the Supreme Court record of the case versus what they said in the movie. And there was another boat before the Amistad, called the Antelope. Same situation, different outcome. What is the Black National Anthem? If you do not know, you will after you read this book. I highly recommend it for teachers, students, parents,grandparents, anybody who really wants to know the truth about the African American experience in the USA.
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Historical documents from a very dark past are collected here in this very well-researched and compelling volume. This reads like a textbook, and the historical accounts are especially chilling describing, as they do, acts of unspeakable inhumanity and cruelty in a sometimes matter-of-fact language. The institution of slavery is close to incomprehensible for a modern reader. I can't decide whether I should be thankful for this, or feel ashamed for having lived a life of such relative ease.

I don't know if this would be considered a definitive collection, but it certainly is a very respectfully compiled overview. You're going to learn something from this work. It is well realized and conceived and of special interest to scholars.
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