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Blood Read: The Vampire as Metaphor in Contemporary Culture Paperback – Oct 1 1997

5.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

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Harry Potter and the Cursed Child
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 264 pages
  • Publisher: Scholarly Book Services Inc (June 27 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0812216288
  • ISBN-13: 978-0812216288
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 1.6 x 22.9 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 422 g
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,244,143 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

Review

"Blood Read is a fresh look at an old form, offering lively, lucid insights into the contemporary explosion of vampire fiction. Nothing else like it exists. This book should set the terms for discussion about vampires for some time to come."-Brian Attebery, Idaho State University

About the Author

Joan Gordon is Associate Professor of English at Nassau Community College in New York. Veronica Hollinger is Associate Professor in the Cultural Studies Program at Trent University in Peterborough, Ontario.

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By A Customer on Aug. 4 2000
Format: Paperback
While many readers are often hesitant to read a book of essays... this book is truly a facinating read. Ancient myths of vampires often revolve around evil and death, but these essays look at the familiar image in a new light, quite relevant to our modern society. Here we explore the many faces of the vampire going far beyond Stoker's "Dracula". Through these essays we see the vampire as more than just a stalker in the night, but as a symbol of our own human insecurities of sexuality, lonliness, and death. Readers of horror will love this book as a companion piece to old favorites as their eyes will be opened to a broader view of a facinating staple of both modern and classic fiction alike.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x9edfcd38) out of 5 stars 4 reviews
23 of 26 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa063c9a8) out of 5 stars A facinating read Aug. 4 2000
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
While many readers are often hesitant to read a book of essays... this book is truly a facinating read. Ancient myths of vampires often revolve around evil and death, but these essays look at the familiar image in a new light, quite relevant to our modern society. Here we explore the many faces of the vampire going far beyond Stoker's "Dracula". Through these essays we see the vampire as more than just a stalker in the night, but as a symbol of our own human insecurities of sexuality, lonliness, and death. Readers of horror will love this book as a companion piece to old favorites as their eyes will be opened to a broader view of a facinating staple of both modern and classic fiction alike.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa063bc3c) out of 5 stars Fantastic book on the vampire in literature July 2 2009
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I loved this book, so much in fact that it spoilt me for all the other texts in this field. Perhaps its the mix of authors and scholars that makes this so readable and enjoyable. Most of the articles are inspired, interesting and accessible to both scholars of the vampire and fans. Overall it made me run out and read every novel discussed that I had not experienced. There isn't a better book in this field. Buy it now!
24 of 38 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9eef73fc) out of 5 stars There's so much to hate here Feb. 5 2009
By Strobe - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
First off, Brian Stapleford makes a valuable contribution with the only essay in this book that doesn't flounder in bitter self-absorption. I feel embarrassed for him for appearing in this collection. I bet he had no idea of the company he would be forced to keep. None of the following applies to him.

Otherwise, those interested in the vampire genre, literary criticism, or thoughtful social commentary will probably be tempted to throw this book across the room. It's that insultingly bad.

The editors' contributions consist of dry, meaningless buzzwords and cliche political hysterics in lieu of substance, which helps explain the lackluster state of liberal arts education in this country (because, unfortunately, they are both teachers). The essays by writers who gush about their own obscure vampire stories come off as sheltered fan-fic typers who never learned the difference between enthusiasm and talent. Most of the other contributors waste their pages projecting their own trite politics, sad neuroses and petty jealousies onto each author and story they ignorantly discuss.

For example:
* One writer asserts that Anne Rice's Interview With a Vampire is really all about America's obsession with dieting as orchestrated by the evil patriarchy (Note: This book was published by a university press, not a real publisher with quality control, so expect constant use of such pseudo-intellectual rhetoric in place of actual ideas. In fact, the different essayists seem to be in competition to see who can use the word "patriarchy" in the most sentences, so you can imagine how engaging they are to read.)

* Another writer philosophizes about how The Lost Boys was really all about demonstrating just how grave a threat capitalism poses to America's exploited, brainwashed teen proletariat. You can almost hear him sighing: If only kids could be deprogrammed and re-educated into realizing communism holds all the answers.

* Saddest of all is probably the writer who somehow believes she's the first one to ever think up the idea of a lesbian vampire, and then blames homophobia for her inability to find a publisher for her Mary Sue vampire stories. It must be homophobia, she explains, because all her friends say her stories are great.

While this collection is initially an insult to thinking people, in the end you'll want to laugh at these writers and pity them at the same time. These are people so obsessed with their own personal political-sexual identities that they unconsciously twist everything they see into a reflection of their own inadequacies then pat themselves on the back for their brilliant insight. It would be sad if they weren't so obnoxiously holier-than-thou about everything.

Though Blood Read is completely worthless as literary criticism or entertainment, it is a great book for psychologists, because each essay reads like a session on the couch with a seriously messed-up person. It demonstrates by example the dangers of existing in a mental vacuum, inoculated against any perspective that doesn't reinforce your self-righteous ego and self-esteem. Unfortunately, it offers little of interest regarding vampires.
By Kindle Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Only read a bit .


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