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Brave New World Revisited Paperback – Jan 12 1989

4.4 out of 5 stars 25 customer reviews

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Paperback, Jan 12 1989
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Harry Potter and the Cursed Child
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Harper Perennial US; Reprint edition (Jan. 1 1989)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060901012
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060901011
  • Product Dimensions: 20.4 x 13.5 x 2.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 159 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars 25 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,096,252 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

Review

“One of the most important books to have been published since the war.”
—Daily Telegraph

“Such ingenious wit, derisive logic and swiftness of expression, Huxley’s resources of sardonic invention have never been more brilliantly displayed.”
—The Times --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

From the Back Cover

When the novel Brave New World first appeared in 1932, its shocking analysis of a scientific dictatorship seemed a projection into the remote future.

Here, in one of the most important and fascinating books of his career, Aldous Huxley uses his tremendous knowledge of human relations to compare the modern-day world with his prophetic fantasy. He scrutinizes threats to humanity, such as overpopulation, propaganda, and chemical persuasion, and explains why we have found it virtually impossible to avoid them. Brave New World Revisited is a trenchant plea that humankind should educate itself for freedom before it is too late.

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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I first read BNW in 1966 during spring of my college freshman year. I enjoyed the book and assumed it was merely imaginative science fiction. Perhaps Huxley was a visionary, a prophet, or just imaginative, but in any event, he was an outstanding writer.

Government control of the mainstream media, socialized medicine, a vast, bloated, impersonal, socialist bureaucracy, "community, identity, stability" I wonder if we're approaching something like BNW, but there's nothing brave about a new world without liberty!
I highly recommend this book! Brave New World
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By A Customer on Feb. 27 2004
Format: Paperback
I would like to keep this short. We all know what the book is about: the bankruptcy of the individual. It's just that most people seem to miss a point: the society depicted in this book is obsessed with being happy and banning every form of discomfort out of their lives. Now there are certain people in this novel who rise up against this society but, I think, their motives are misunderstood: most people seem to think these dissenters are fighting for the right to be free so they can be happy in their own individual way. Actually they are fighting for the right to be unhappy, to suffer. For the greatest freedom you can enjoy as an individual is the right to be your miserable self.
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Format: Paperback
You *MUST* read this book!
Huxley wrote a masterpiece of a book in "Brave New World". "Brave New World Revisited" is a fantastic critical analysis of "BNW", how it differs with Orwell's "1984", and the world as Huxley saw it some 30 after the book debuted. His commentary and social criticism cut deep, and this cautionary tale is perhaps more applicable today than it has ever been (as evidenced in George W. Bush's reference to "BNW" in his speech concerning government funding of stem cell research).
This surely is an important book.
The amazing thing is, though, that even as such, it is a thrill to read. The dialogue is snappy, the narration rich, and the scenarios hilarious and frightening -- often at the same time. This is SF at its best. This is SF as literature.
I cannot sing the praises of "BNW" highly enough. I will waste no more of your time talking about it -- use it to read this book instead!
Recommended for: Everyone (even those who don't normally read SF)
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Format: Paperback
Correct me if I'm wrong, but there seem to be No reviews before 2001 for a book published in 2007. Guess that means there is no reference to Atwood's analysis?
-/-

Furthermore, the list of Huxley's books omits his final utopian work 'ISLAND', published in 1961, 30 years after this dystopia 'Brave New World'.

I read ISLAND ~1968-69, after reading Brave New World, while being taught by Marxists at Simon Fraser University. In 1973, I was in business, had some money to spend & bought 50 copies to give to my family & friends (who likely filed them on bookshelves for later reading). There may be 1 left for my heirs....

ISLAND is quite fascinating for what mankind *could* but likely won't be because of the way biology (the universe?) seems to be constructed.

The universe seems to be constructed as Dualism, everywhere working the tension between opposing pairs. For example, Co-operation & Competition are both needed for individuals, families, tribes, enterprises, countries to succeed.

One CBC Radio Ideas programme explored the question as to who lives longest in society. Before reading the answer below, pause & think of Your first response to that question.

The researchers said that the longest livers were those with the most ...

status /hierarchy (think of our royal family) ... "and this is the same in every mammalian society".

My conclusion is that this explains the dictators of the world. Think of our past (the 1000 yr history of the British monarchy which Canada inherits & should never forget, where the ruled have battled the rulers for the right to change kings peacefully), and of our present world (with so many dictators pretending to be presidents).
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Format: Paperback
Much of the comment about this classic look into the crystal ball concerns its place in literature alongside its rival masterpiece, 1984. The first is a picaresque satire, playful and humorous in parts, despite the seriousness of its underlying message. It optimistically describes a world where everybody is happy, or ought to be. The second is a bleak political polemic of a world where everybody suffers, with no plausible end in sight. Each is the product of its time, but the times were separated not merely by three decades; three major dictators ----- Hitler, Stalin and Mau ----- as well as many minor ones changed our world during these years. It is therefore a clever stroke to have had Margaret Atwood, herself no slouch at crystal gazing, write a perceptive foreword in which she compares the accuracy and impact of these two powerful literary prophesies. At the end, the process is taken up by Huxley himself who presents an illuminating balance sheet of wins and losses in his revisitation of the world he himself had constructed. He has every right to pat himself on the back. He accurately saw the demise of religion and morality and their replacement by unlimited self-indulgence as the direction in which his world was “progressing”. The conversion of all humanity into the plaything of Big Government is so tellingly depicted that I find it surprising that his book has not yet replaced Ayn Rand’s Atlas Shrugged as the official New Testament of the Republican Tea Party. The one thing that neither he or Orwell foresaw was the electronic revolution, the seed of its own destruction that Capitalism, like all ideologies, ultimately created.Read more ›
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