Buy Used
CDN$ 0.01
+ CDN$ 6.49 shipping
Used: Like New | Details
Sold by Books Squared
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: Ships from the USA. Please allow 14-21 business days for delivery. Book appears to be new. Book Selection as BIG as Texas.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Bread and Wine: Readings for Lent and Easter Paperback – Mar 10 2005

5.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
CDN$ 35.57 CDN$ 0.01

There is a newer edition of this item:


Harry Potter and the Cursed Child
click to open popover

No Kindle device required. Download one of the Free Kindle apps to start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, and computer.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product Details

  • Paperback: 412 pages
  • Publisher: Orbis Books (March 10 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1570755728
  • ISBN-13: 978-1570755729
  • Product Dimensions: 18.4 x 12.9 x 2.6 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 386 g
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #245,131 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  •  Would you like to update product info, give feedback on images, or tell us about a lower price?

Product Description

From Publishers Weekly

Has there ever been a more hard-hitting, beautifully written, theologically inclusive anthology of writings for Lent and Easter? It's doubtful. Many readers may well find that this collection-a sequel to Plough's highly successful Watch for the Light: Readings for Advent and Christmas-is the one book they return to year after year, forgoing their usual custom of buying a new Lenten devotional each spring. Six separate sections (Invitation, Temptation, Passion, Crucifixion, Resurrection and New Life) guide readers through the essential elements of spiritual preparation and feature writings from some of Christendom's most celebrated masters. Classic thinkers such as Martin Luther and John Donne share space with 20th-century theologians like C.S. Lewis, G.K. Chesterton and Dorothy Day. There is also a generous sampling from contemporary writers, including Philip Yancey, John Updike, Frederick Buechner, Madeleine L'Engle, Henri Nouwen and Brennan Manning. Caveat lector: no one should have this much pleasure during Lent!
Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Review

Has there ever been a more hard-hitting, beautifully written, theologically inclusive anthology of writings for Lent and Easter? It's doubtful. Many readers may well find that this collection-a sequel to Plough's highly successful Watch for the Light: Readings for Advent and Christmas-is the one book they return to year after year, forgoing their usual custom of buying a new Lenten devotional each spring. Six separate sections (Invitation, Temptation, Passion, Crucifixion, Resurrection and New Life) guide readers through the essential elements of spiritual preparation and feature writings from some of Christendom's most celebrated masters. Classic thinkers such as Martin Luther and John Donne share space with 20th-century theologians like C.S. Lewis, G.K. Chesterton and Dorothy Day. There is also a generous sampling from contemporary writers, including Philip Yancey, John Updike, Frederick Buechner, Madeleine L'Engle, Henri Nouwen and Brennan Manning. Caveat lector: no one should have this much pleasure during Lent! (Publishers Weekly (starred review)) --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

See all Product Description

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
This is a small, easily-carried book organized into the topics of Invitation, Temptation, Passion, Crucifixion, Resurrection and New Life. The 72 essays are from an eclectic mix of authors: Oscar Wilde, Thomas Merton, John Donne, Kahlil Gibran, Blaise Pascal, Martin Luther, G.K.Chesterton, Mother Teresa, Dylan Thomas, John Updike, Dorothy Sayers, Madeleine L'Engle, Leo Tolstoy and many others. Selections are typically five to six pages long, and printed in a large clean font on heavy paper. There are a few poems, but primarily prose is used to inspire and to comfort.
A wonderful little book.
One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
By A Customer on March 22 2003
Format: Hardcover
This book will take you through the season of Lent, Holy Week and the glories of Easter. A wonderful thought provoking book to be enjoyed year after year.
One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x9d5622b8) out of 5 stars 63 reviews
65 of 66 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9d40fe34) out of 5 stars A Wonderful Collection June 8 2003
By Paul M. Dubuc - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
"For Breadth of scope and depth of insight nothing rivals this collection", says on the dust jacket. I heartily agree! This collection of readings is the best supplement to Lenten and Easter devotional reading that I have ever used. I've never seen such a selection of great authors' writings between the covers of one book. Each of the 72 selections are about 4 or 5 pages long. They are grouped into 6 sections that form a progression from the Invitation prepare for Easter by seriously examining oneself and following through on the themes of Temptation, Passion, Crucifixion, Resurrection and New Life. There are quite a variety of perspectives represented in these writings. Every one of them will reward the thoughtful reader in different ways. There isn't a dull one in the bunch. These aren't shallow "inspirational" writings. They will challenge and encourage, and sustain serious reflection. It's hard to pick a favorite, but I'd say that Malcolm Muggeridge's "Impending Resurrection" was the high point. I highly recommend this book.
42 of 45 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9d40fe88) out of 5 stars small, beautiful, inspirational March 26 2003
By audrey frances - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a small, easily-carried book organized into the topics of Invitation, Temptation, Passion, Crucifixion, Resurrection and New Life. The 72 essays are from an eclectic mix of authors: Oscar Wilde, Thomas Merton, John Donne, Kahlil Gibran, Blaise Pascal, Martin Luther, G.K.Chesterton, Mother Teresa, Dylan Thomas, John Updike, Dorothy Sayers, Madeleine L'Engle, Leo Tolstoy and many others. Selections are typically five to six pages long, and printed in a large clean font on heavy paper. There are a few poems, but primarily prose is used to inspire and to comfort.
A wonderful little book.
24 of 25 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9d413180) out of 5 stars A unique spiritual experience. March 12 2007
By Brad Shorr - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
These 72 brief essays are loaded with inspiring and challenging spiritual insight. The authors are incredibly diverse--Leo Tolstoy, Thomas a Kempis, Meister Eckhart, Martin Luther, Mother Teresa, and John Updike, to name a few. Not every contributor is a household name, but every reflection is moving and powerful...

"Christianity is the only religion on earth that has felt that omnipotence made God incomplete." G.K. Chesterton

"If the ultimate, the hardest, cannot be asked of me; if my fellows hesitate to ask it and turn to someone else, then I know nothing of Calvary love." Amy Carmichael

"The essence of sin is man substituting himself for God, while the essence of salvation is God substituting himself for man." John Scott

"A follower is or strives to be what he admires. An admirer, however, keeps himself personally detached." Soren Kierkegaard

Those thoughts alone might supply forty days-worth of spiritual reflection! For preparation and renewal, this book is can be opened again and again.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9d41369c) out of 5 stars Break the Bread and Pour the Wine... Feb. 3 2015
By Gardener&Reviewer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Bread and Wine is a collection of seventy-two readings spanning all the themes of Lent and Easter.
There are poems, prayers, meditations, excerpts from sermons and essays and lengthy theological tomes.

The authors come from all over the world, from all ages and times.

There is Kahlil Gibran, an early 20th century Lebanese poet raised as a Maronite Catholic.
There is George MacDonald, a Scottish fantasy author and minister in the 1800s.
There is Ernesto Cardenal, a Nicaraguan poet and cultural activist.
There is Walter J. Ciszek, a Jesuit priest who served within the Soviet Union.
There is Edna Hong, a Kierkegaard scholar and translator as well as a novelist.
There is Peter Kreeft, a contemporary philosophy professor at Boston College.

The material is arranged under five main headings, and I'll give you a few examples from each one.

Invitation~
This section calls us to Come near to the Cross, Hear His words, See Ourselves, Repent, and then Go Forth.
The first selection is a poem by Oscar Wilde, with that plaintive cry "How else but through a broken heart can the Lord Christ enter in?"
Walter Wangerin speaks about Christ as the perfect Mirror, the one that terrifies and startles with its clarity- and yet heals us too.
"This mirror is made of righteous flesh and of divinity- and this one loves me absolutely."
Jean-Pierre de Caussade writes about surrender: "Everything is yours, everything is from you and for you. Mine is to be satisfied with your work..."
Edna Hong describes the way Lent strips the soul and then Christ supplies His fullness.

Temptation~
We are tempted to drowse like the Apostles when we should be awake, to use force like Peter to move the Kingdom forward, to distance ourselves from the common sinners who crucified Christ, to deny our Lord with words and deeds.
Phillip Berrigan calls us to "Watch, learn, act- for formula for a faithful and sane life."
Fleming Rutledge calls us to find ourselves in the crowd at Good Friday, "... you will also come to know the depth of your own participation in sin. <i>and at the very same moment</i> (this is the glory of Good Friday) you will come to know the true reality, the true joy and gladness, of the the good news of salvation in Jesus Christ our Lord."
Kahlil Gibran shouts in a whisper- "He came to make the human heart a temple, and the soul an altar, and the mind a priest."

Passion~
Jurgen Moltmann: "At the point where men and women lose hope, where they become powerless and can do nothing more, the lonely, assailed and forsaken Christ waits for them and gives them a share in His passion. He is like the brother of the friend to whom one can confide <i>everything</i>, because he knows everything and has suffered everything that can happen to us- and more."
Mother Theresa, writing from Christ's perspective: "Do you thirst to be cherished? I thirst for you. That is how precious you are to me. Come to me and fill your heart and heal your wounds."

Crucifixion~
Thomas Howard meditates on the Crucifix. "It focuses things. It may even come to our rescue if words fail: the corpus, bowed in agony but with arms stretched wide, says, not in sentences but in its very shape, 'Come unto me, all ye that labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you.' "
Paul Tillich says: "No longer is the universe subject to the law of death out of birth. It is subjected to a higher law, to the law of life out of death... Since this moment the universe is no longer what it was; nature has received another meaning; history is transformed and you and I are no more what we were before."

Resurrection~
C. S. Lewis addresses this as only he can: "Something new has happened in the Universe, something as new as the first coming of organic life. A new mode of being has arisen. That is the story. What are we going to make of it?"
Karl Barth: "Even in blooming and healthy life, there is a yawning chasm, a deep pit that cannot be filled by any art of power of man. Only one word is sufficient... 'Jesus is victor!'-that is, resurrection."

New Life~
This last section began with a delightful surprise for me- a John Masefield poem! "The Everlasting Mercy."
Alfred Kazin describes encountering the New Testament as a young Jew: "I tasted the rightness of each word on my tongue. It was like heaping my own arms with gifts. Surely I had been waiting for him all my life, our own Yeshua..."

As with Plough's Advent/Christ collection "Watch for the Light," this is a great choice if you want to hear various voices all coming together around Christ.
Obviously, this devotional does not stay within the confines of contemporary Evangelicalism. It's not a paragraph a day by popular people.
You may even have reservations about some contributor's theology, but every selection in here will prompt you to reflect.
And if you let it, "Bread and Wine" will provide sustenance on the road of repentance and Resurrection rejoicing.

I thank Plough Publishing House for providing me with a review copy.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9d4136b4) out of 5 stars A Wonderful, Insightful, Seasonal Devotional March 6 2015
By Create With Joy - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
If you want to deepen your spiritual life and reflect on the mystery and miracle of Christ's death and resurrection - then consider Bread And Wine - Readings For Lent And Easter for your personal devotional time!

Bread And Wine is a collection of 72 readings from a wide spectrum of classic and contemporary authors who share their thoughts on the following themes:

* Invitation
* Temptation
* Passion
* Crucifixion
* Resurrection
* New Life

In case you are wondering why there are 72 readings since there are only 40 days in Lent, the first 46 readings cover events that occur during the official season of Lent, which runs from Ash Wednesday through Holy Saturday, and the last two sections focus on post-Easter themes.

What I like most about Bread And Wine is that it has given me a fresh perspective on and a deeper appreciation for Lent - a solemn season I associate with self-sacrifice and somberness from my childhood.

The Editors write:

Lent is the season in which we ought to be surprised by joy. Our self-sacrifice serves no purpose unless, by laying aside this or that desire, we are able to focus on our heart's deepest desire - unity with Christ. In Him - in His suffering and death - His resurrection and triumph - we find our truest joy.

I thoroughly enjoy the diverse readings in Bread And Wine. I find that the daily reflections provide a great way to focus on Christ and to ponder what His life, death, and resurrection really mean.

Disclosure: I received a copy of this book from the publisher for review purposes. However, the opinions expressed in this review are entirely my own.


Feedback