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Carpenter Ants of the United States and Canada Hardcover – May 15 2005

4.6 out of 5 stars 6 ratings

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Frequently bought together

  • Carpenter Ants of the United States and Canada
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  • Urban Ants of North America and Europe: Identification, Biology, and Management
Total price: CDN$149.88
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Product details

  • Hardcover : 224 pages
  • ISBN-10 : 0801442621
  • ISBN-13 : 978-0801442629
  • Product Dimensions : 16.51 x 2.54 x 24.13 cm
  • Publisher : Cornell University Press (May 15 2005)
  • Item Weight : 28 g
  • Language: : English
  • Customer Reviews:
    4.6 out of 5 stars 6 ratings

Product description

From Booklist

Carpenter ants are found all over the world, where they play a major role in forests as predators of leaf-eating insects. Like all ants, carpenter ants live in large colonies, with workers, the queen, and various other insects that live in the colony as "guests." In the first book entirely devoted to the subject, entomologists Hansen and Klotz reveal these facts and more as they examine every phase of the ants' lifestyle. From mating swarms to the founding of a new colony, foraging behavior, and the construction of nests, the authors' research as well as the extensive literature on these ants is mined for a comprehensive account. A lengthy chapter examines the economic importance and management of the most common pest species. Heavily illustrated with photos, drawings, and maps, this is a very useful addition to the literature on insects. Nancy Bent
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

Review

"Carpenter ants are found all over the world, where they play a major role in forests as predators of leaf-eating insects. Like all ants, carpenter ants live in large colonies, with workers, the queen, and various other insects that live in the colony as 'guests.' In the first book entirely devoted to the subject, entomologists Hansen and Klotz reveal these facts and more as they examine every phase of the ants' lifestyle. From mating swarms to the founding of a new colony, foraging behavior, and the construction of nests, the authors' research as well as the extensive literature on these ants is mined for a comprehensive account. A lengthy chapter examines the economic importance and management of the most common pest species. Heavily illustrated with photos, drawings, and maps, this is a very useful addition to the literature on insects."

(Booklist)

"This text is a concise and authoritative introduction on the carpenter ants that are structural pests in the United States and Canada. The authors present lucid, well-referenced chapters covering the ecology, morphology, taxonomy and distribution, life history, foraging, and economic importance and management of these wood-destroying organisms. An essential text for entomologists, ecologists, naturalists, structural pest control personnel, and anyone interested in these fascinating and ecologically important insects."

(Northeastern Naturalist)