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Carrots Love Tomatoes: Secrets of Companion Planting for Successful Gardening Paperback – Jan 2 1998

4.6 out of 5 stars 27 customer reviews

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  • Carrots Love Tomatoes: Secrets of Companion Planting for Successful Gardening
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Storey Publishing, LLC; 2nd Rev and Updated ed. edition (Jan. 2 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1580170277
  • ISBN-13: 978-1580170277
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 1.6 x 22.9 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 363 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars 27 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #38,957 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

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This gardening classic was first published in 1975, and now a second generation of gardeners who prefer pest-resistant planning to chemicals will find a place for it on the shelves. Not only does it tell what to plant with what, but also how to use herbal sprays to control insects, what wild plants to encourage in the garden, how to grow fruit and nut trees, how to start small plots or window-box gardens, and much more. It's one of the most practical books around for any gardener of edibles, no matter how serious or casual.

Review

Carrots Love Tomatoes, by Louise Riotte…a guide to companion planting that has become legendary in gardening circles ever since the first edition was printed in 1975”

 -Spokesman-Review

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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I love CARROTS LOVE TOMATOES-an update and revision of the original companion planting book. I used many of these ideas the summer of 1975 when I had a half acre garden. My traditional farmer neighbor laughed when I told him what I was going to do, but later in the summer when the insects devastated his vegetable patch he threatened to come over and pull up all my borage and marigolds. He had to admit I was onto something. We had a few mishaps-white and yellow corn planted to close together = polka-dot corn, but we ran beans up the stalks as Riotte suggests and it worked well. The Mexican bean beatles came to visit and stayed for dinner, but we soon learned how to control them. Marigolds in the rows and our evening search to destroy the yellow egg clusters ensured a good crop. My kids learned a great deal about "real" survival that summer and they didn't find it on tv. We had squash, melons, tomatoes, and all sorts of other vegetables, herbs, and flowers, and mixed and matched them as companion plants. At the end of the summer, I canned like crazy and made colorful jars of green beans and white and yellow corn. Everything we grew was organic and it tasted great.
Louise Riotte includes many suggestions from the first book. Topics in the new edition include vegetables, herbs, wild plants, grasses and grains, and others. Considering what is planted where is important. For example, you should not plant peppers, eggplants, and tomatoes close together or in the same container. These vegetables are related and planting them close together inhibits growth.
Matching vegetables and herbs or avoiding combinations of vegetables and herbs that inhibit each other isn't the only topic discussed in this book.
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Format: Paperback
I bought both of Louise Riotte's books, only to be disappointed by the fact that companion gardening is a small portion of the book. There are several other chapters on various interesting topics, but I wouldn't bill either one as a guide to companion planting.
The book is very interesting, but don't buy it if you are trying to get started in companion planting/gardening. Buy Great Garden Companions by Sally Jean Cunningham instead. You'll get much more out of it.
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Format: Paperback
I am a novice gardener and I found this book to be a great quick and easy reference guide for my first vegetable garden. It is very easy to find your desired veggies and see their friends and foe's. Additionally there are chapters about herbs, fruits and trees that are quick and to-the-point. The book is a high level overview which, for a beginner, is all the information I can take in at one time. It provides you enough to ensure successful plantings and not overwhelm you.
My favorite parts are actually the few sketches of different garden layouts. I wish there were more! These are easy cheat sheets people can apply to their own gardens without even having to read a word.
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Format: Paperback
This is a lovely book, filled with diagrams and charts. The nature of companion benefit or detriment is clearly and thoroughly examined in the first half of the book, while the second half demonstrates how to best plan for a garden even if you have no more than a small window. The children's garden and postage stamp garden plans deserve special mention.
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By Kat TOP 1000 REVIEWER on Dec 30 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I thought this book would be focused solely on companion planting and based on the title, assumed it would be primarily for vegetable gardening. For reference, the section on vegetables is 23 pages, the section on herbs is 21 pages. Later in the book there is a section on garden techniques (12 pages) which provides some additional information on companion planting for vegetables, and there is a nice 3-page summary of companion plants (and competitor plants) at the back. The remaining ~140 pages cover wild plants, grasses, grains and field crops, home fruit growing, nuts, ornamental trees & shrubs, soil improvement, pest control, poisonous plants, and garden plans.

My overall comment is that the vegetable and herb sections are short, and in a few cases doesn't deliver the information I'm interested in. For example, the section on peppers lists all the different varieties of peppers, but fails to mention which companion plants peppers prefer. The section on peppers also describes the history of Chiles and some useful "tips" such as "Chiles serve as a natural meat preservative by retarding the oxidation of fats" which seem irrelevant to the subject matter (more interesting tidbits are scattered throughout the book). Another example is squash, which focuses on tips for planting, insect treatment and when to harvest. There is no information on companion planting (the three sisters of native american agriculture - maize/squash/beans would be the obvious one!). Also, when a section does discuss companion plants, text is often restricted to comments such as "cauliflower does not like tomatoes or strawberries". It would be nice to know why - e.g., do the plants compete for the same nutrients, do they attract certain pests, or ???
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Format: Paperback
I love this book. Ms. Riotte has answered many questions I have had. Nicely written for those just beginning there journey into gardening. She even devotes a section solely to poisonous plants which is very interesting! Ms. Riotte breaks the chapters down as follows: Vegetables; Herbs; Wild Plants; Grasses, Grains, and Field Crops; First Steps for Home Fruit Growing; Nuts; Ornamental Trees and Shrubs; Garden Techniques; Soil Improvement; Pest Control;Poisonous Plants; Garden Plans; Sources; Suggested Reading. I like the fact that things are crossed referenced, so while it is a good read, you can also use it as a manual. The only thing I thought could be improved upon in the book was the drawings of the garden plans. They look as though someone drew them on a piece of paper and then photocopied them into the book. They are legible but hard to read. Luckily in writing they explain what they are drawing.
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