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The Case of the Horrified Heirs Paperback – Mar 1 1995

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Ballantine Books (March 1 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0345470435
  • ISBN-13: 978-0345470430
  • Product Dimensions: 14 x 1.3 x 21.6 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 308 g
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #548,303 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

About the Author

Erle Stanley Gardner (1889-1970) is the master of American mystery fiction. A civil rights lawyer, his mysteries contain intricate, ever-twisting plots. Challenging and full of surprises, these are whodunits in the best tradition. He wrote 146 books, 85 of which feature Perry Mason. The fictional attorney became the basis of a number of television series (reputedly 271 episodes), and achieved an enviable record for winning his cases. Erle Stanley Gardner has an amazing sales record: at the height of his popularity in the mid-1960s he was selling an average of 26,000 copies of his novels a day, making him one of the world's best selling author's, easily outstripping at the time Agatha Christie and Barbara Cartland combined. Born in Malden, Massachusetts, Gardner went on to attend Law School in Indiana, but this only lasted for around a month, being suspended because of various distractions to his studies, especially boxing. He moved to California and became a self-taught attorney before opening his own law office. However, being bored with this he ended up working in sales for five years. Returning to the law in 1921, he created another law firm, but again was not really enthusiastic, other than when acting as a trial lawyer. Writing was his great passion and eventually he gave up the law completely to pursue a full time writing career. In this he was prodigious, setting himself a target of 66,000 words per week. His output under various pseudonyms, as well as his own, went wider than Perry Mason and also extended to non-fiction. He became an expert on the early Mexican exploitation of California. In later life, law did play a significant part in his life once again. With friends, he set up what they termed 'The Court of Last Resort', aimed at investigating and attempting to reverse what they perceived as miscarriages of justice because of poor legal representation, or evidential problems. Gardner himself once wrote: 'I want to make my hero a fighter, not by having him be ruthless to women and underlings, but by creating a character who, with infinite patience jockeys his enemies into a position where he can deliver one good knockout punch.'

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Format: Mass Market Paperback
Erle stanley gardener is a master at weaving a web of suspense around his readers. Like all the other Perry Mason books, this one too, holds your interest till the last pages. It is very difficult to guess at the identity of the murderer in his books, which of course contributes to the fun.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0xa430cac8) out of 5 stars 21 reviews
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa379a420) out of 5 stars The case of the horrified heirs April 2 2000
By Anitha John - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Erle stanley gardener is a master at weaving a web of suspense around his readers. Like all the other Perry Mason books, this one too, holds your interest till the last pages. It is very difficult to guess at the identity of the murderer in his books, which of course contributes to the fun.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa379a474) out of 5 stars Another Puzzling Mystery Oct. 19 2005
By Acute Observer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The Case of the Horrified Heirs

"Murder is a product of greed, avarice, hate, revenge, or perhaps fear." [No mention of love or sex here.] Lauretta Trent is in the hospital because of stomach problems. The Trent residence is a big house with Lauretta's sisters and husbands, plus housekeeper, maid, cook, chauffeur, and nurse. Lauretta's Doctor Alton warns her that gastroenteric upsets can damage her heart. Virginia Baxter arrives at the airport. The police got a tip, opened her baggage, and found narcotics! So she calls Perry Mason. The presence of a photographer makes this a lot more sinister. Virginia did not give permission for the search. More important, the contraband narcotics put her bags over the recorded weight limit! Judge Albert dismisses the case. More photographs are take to give publicity to the dismissal. Perry learns that Virginia refused to give her husband a divorce, and advises her to wipe the slate clean. But a stranger asks questions about her former law firm, and the story takes a new turn. When Virginia learns of interest shown in the records from her former law firm, she calls Perry Mason again. [This story is a lead-in to Lauretta Trent.]

This story will tell you about when a copy of a will can be used for the original. Also why the symptoms of arsenic poisoning are often overlooked (Chapter 9). Perry has surmised the intent of "George Menard", and Virginia takes part in setting a trap. When Dr. Alton gets samples the test for arsenic is positive. They travel to warn Lauretta Trent, but she has gone away on a ride with her chauffeur. Virginia is lured away to a Malibu motel, but no one shows up. Then we learn that Lauretta Trent's car was hit and fell over a cliff into the ocean; her body wasn't found. The smashed fender on Virginia's car links her to this accident. And so Virginia Baxter is arrested for murder. In Chapter 19 Perry steps back to try to look at the big picture on Virginia Baxter. The questions here have obvious answers, but are they the right answers?

Perry Mason explains the difference between a doctor and a lawyer. A doctor can't get too wrapped up in his patients, some have incurable diseases. But a lawyer can better his client if he knew exactly what to do (Chapter 20). The discussion between Perry and Della leads Perry to think of another reason to frame Virginia. Perry's hunch and investigation lead to a solution from the person involved in the frame-ups (Chapter 22). [It also tells something about the informer system.] In the last chapter the missing pieces of the puzzle come together. This is a good story, but the ending is a little too cute or forced. Like most of Gardner's novels, it will keep you in suspense to the end.
HASH(0xa379a8ac) out of 5 stars Another Puzzling Mystery June 9 2015
By Acute Observer - Published on Amazon.com
The Case of the Horrified Heirs

“Murder is a product of greed, avarice, hate, revenge, or perhaps fear.” [No mention of love or sex here.] Lauretta Trent is in the hospital because of stomach problems. The Trent residence is a big house with Lauretta’s sisters and husbands, plus housekeeper, maid, cook, chauffeur, and nurse. Lauretta’s Doctor Alton warns her that gastroenteric upsets can damage her heart. Virginia Baxter arrives at the airport. The police got a tip, opened her baggage, and found narcotics! So she calls Perry Mason. The presence of a photographer makes this a lot more sinister. Virginia did not give permission for the search. More important, the contraband narcotics put her bags over the recorded weight limit! Judge Albert dismisses the case. More photographs are taken to give publicity to the dismissal. Perry learns that Virginia refused to give her husband a divorce, and advises her to wipe the slate clean. But a stranger asks questions about her former law firm, and the story takes a new turn. When Virginia learns of interest shown in the records from her former law firm, she calls Perry Mason again. [This story is a lead-in to Lauretta Trent.]

This story will tell you about when a copy of a will can be used for the original. Also why the symptoms of arsenic poisoning are often overlooked (Chapter 9). Perry has surmised the intent of “George Menard”, and Virginia takes part in setting a trap. When Dr. Alton gets samples the test for arsenic is positive. They travel to warn Lauretta Trent, but she has gone away on a ride with her chauffeur. Virginia is lured away to a Malibu motel, but no one shows up. Then we learn that Lauretta Trent’s car was hit and fell over a cliff into the ocean; her body wasn’t found. The smashed fender on Virginia’s car links her to this accident. And so Virginia Baxter is arrested for murder. In Chapter 19 Perry steps back to try to look at the big picture on Virginia Baxter. The questions here have obvious answers, but are they the right answers?

Perry Mason explains the difference between a doctor and a lawyer. A doctor can’t get too wrapped up in his patients, some have incurable diseases. But a lawyer can better his client if he knew exactly what to do (Chapter 20). The discussion between Perry and Della leads Perry to think of another reason to frame Virginia. Perry’s hunch and investigation lead to a solution from the person involved in the frame-ups (Chapter 22). [It also tells something about the informer system.] In the last chapter the missing pieces of the puzzle come together. This is a good story, but the ending is a little too cute or forced. Like most of Gardner’s novels, it will keep you in suspense to the end.
HASH(0xa379a84c) out of 5 stars Another Puzzling Mystery June 9 2015
By Acute Observer - Published on Amazon.com
The Case of the Horrified Heirs

“Murder is a product of greed, avarice, hate, revenge, or perhaps fear.” [No mention of love or sex here.] Lauretta Trent is in the hospital because of stomach problems. The Trent residence is a big house with Lauretta’s sisters and husbands, plus housekeeper, maid, cook, chauffeur, and nurse. Lauretta’s Doctor Alton warns her that gastroenteric upsets can damage her heart. Virginia Baxter arrives at the airport. The police got a tip, opened her baggage, and found narcotics! So she calls Perry Mason. The presence of a photographer makes this a lot more sinister. Virginia did not give permission for the search. More important, the contraband narcotics put her bags over the recorded weight limit! Judge Albert dismisses the case. More photographs are taken to give publicity to the dismissal. Perry learns that Virginia refused to give her husband a divorce, and advises her to wipe the slate clean. But a stranger asks questions about her former law firm, and the story takes a new turn. When Virginia learns of interest shown in the records from her former law firm, she calls Perry Mason again. [This story is a lead-in to Lauretta Trent.]

This story will tell you about when a copy of a will can be used for the original. Also why the symptoms of arsenic poisoning are often overlooked (Chapter 9). Perry has surmised the intent of “George Menard”, and Virginia takes part in setting a trap. When Dr. Alton gets samples the test for arsenic is positive. They travel to warn Lauretta Trent, but she has gone away on a ride with her chauffeur. Virginia is lured away to a Malibu motel, but no one shows up. Then we learn that Lauretta Trent’s car was hit and fell over a cliff into the ocean; her body wasn’t found. The smashed fender on Virginia’s car links her to this accident. And so Virginia Baxter is arrested for murder. In Chapter 19 Perry steps back to try to look at the big picture on Virginia Baxter. The questions here have obvious answers, but are they the right answers?

Perry Mason explains the difference between a doctor and a lawyer. A doctor can’t get too wrapped up in his patients, some have incurable diseases. But a lawyer can better his client if he knew exactly what to do (Chapter 20). The discussion between Perry and Della leads Perry to think of another reason to frame Virginia. Perry’s hunch and investigation lead to a solution from the person involved in the frame-ups (Chapter 22). [It also tells something about the informer system.] In the last chapter the missing pieces of the puzzle come together. This is a good story, but the ending is a little too cute or forced. Like most of Gardner’s novels, it will keep you in suspense to the end.
HASH(0xa379ac24) out of 5 stars Another Puzzling Mystery & Murder in the Mountains Oct. 19 2005
By Acute Observer - Published on Amazon.com
Horrified Heirs & Buried Clock, Erle Stanley Gardner

Erle Stanley Gardner was once "the World's Greatest Author", his novels outsold the combined totals of his rivals. Gardner wrote the "Perry Mason" novels and other works. Gardner and others formed "The Court of Last Resort" to investigate the wrongfully convicted. The background tells of the era, the monetary figures date these stories.

"The Case of the Horrified Heirs" (1964) begins when Lauretta Trent is in the hospital. The Trent residence is a big house with Lauretta's sisters and husbands, housekeeper, maid, cook, chauffeur, and nurse. Doctor Alton warns Lauretta that gastroenteric upsets can damage her heart. Virginia Baxter arrives at the airport. The police got a tip, opened her baggage, and found narcotics! Baxter calls Perry Mason. The presence of a photographer makes this sinister. Virginia did not give permission for the search. The contraband narcotics put her bags over the recorded weight limit! Judge Albert dismisses the case. More photographs are taken to give publicity to the dismissal. Perry learns that Virginia refused to give her husband a divorce, and advises her to wipe the slate clean. When a stranger asks questions about her former law firm, and the story takes a new turn. Virginia learns calls Perry Mason again. The symptoms of arsenic poisoning are often overlooked. Perry has surmised the intent of "George Menard", and Virginia takes part in setting a trap. When Dr. Alton tests a sample for arsenic the result is positive. They travel to warn Lauretta Trent, but she has gone away on a ride with her chauffeur. Virginia is lured away to a Malibu motel, but no one shows up. Then we learn that Lauretta Trent's car was hit and fell over a cliff into the ocean; her body wasn't found. The smashed fender on Virginia's car links her to this accident. And so Virginia Baxter is arrested for murder. Perry steps back to try to look at the big picture. This leads Perry to think of another reason to frame Virginia. Perry's hunch and investigation lead to a solution of the person involved in the frame-ups. In the last chapter the missing pieces of the puzzle come together.

"The Case of the Buried Clock" (1943) begins in the rural hills of southern California. Vincent Blane, store owner and banker, has two daughters. One is married to Jake Hardisty, the other is seeing Harley Raymond. Jack Hardisty stole a huge sum of money from his father-in-law's bank. Adele Blane and Harley are at the cabin when Jack arrives; they leave. When Harley returns, he finds Jack's body in a bedroom. No murder weapon or money. The police investigate. Perry Mason is hired to defend Millicent, Jack's widow, who was seen near the cabin and has no alibi. Her revolver was found near the cabin. Was it the murder weapon? When the trial begins, the autopsy surgeon testifies that scopolamine was found in Jake's body. It is used as a "truth serum". The estimated time of death was between 7:30pm and 10:00pm. Can the age of a person be determined from a "spectacle lens"? Were the other people who were around at the time of the murder just innocently passing by? Finding two revolvers complicates the case, as well as the buried alarm clock. But Perry Mason figures out what really happened. A negative in a camera is not definitive proof, unless you can be sure when it was taken. The trial is adjourned, and Millicent is not convicted. Can an alarm clock do more than tell time?


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