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The Case of the Lucky Legs Hardcover – Dec 1 1976

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Harry Potter and the Cursed Child
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 282 pages
  • Publisher: Amereon Ltd (Dec 1 1976)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0884114031
  • ISBN-13: 978-0884114031
  • Product Dimensions: 15.3 x 2 x 22.3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 522 g
  • Average Customer Review: 1.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,160,215 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

About the Author

Erle Stanley Gardner (1889-1970) is the master of American mystery fiction. A civil rights lawyer, his mysteries contain intricate, ever-twisting plots. Challenging and full of surprises, these are whodunits in the best tradition. He wrote 146 books, 85 of which feature Perry Mason. The fictional attorney became the basis of a number of television series (reputedly 271 episodes), and achieved an enviable record for winning his cases. Erle Stanley Gardner has an amazing sales record: at the height of his popularity in the mid-1960s he was selling an average of 26,000 copies of his novels a day, making him one of the world's best selling author's, easily outstripping at the time Agatha Christie and Barbara Cartland combined. Born in Malden, Massachusetts, Gardner went on to attend Law School in Indiana, but this only lasted for around a month, being suspended because of various distractions to his studies, especially boxing. He moved to California and became a self-taught attorney before opening his own law office. However, being bored with this he ended up working in sales for five years. Returning to the law in 1921, he created another law firm, but again was not really enthusiastic, other than when acting as a trial lawyer. Writing was his great passion and eventually he gave up the law completely to pursue a full time writing career. In this he was prodigious, setting himself a target of 66,000 words per week. His output under various pseudonyms, as well as his own, went wider than Perry Mason and also extended to non-fiction. He became an expert on the early Mexican exploitation of California. In later life, law did play a significant part in his life once again. With friends, he set up what they termed 'The Court of Last Resort', aimed at investigating and attempting to reverse what they perceived as miscarriages of justice because of poor legal representation, or evidential problems. Gardner himself once wrote: 'I want to make my hero a fighter, not by having him be ruthless to women and underlings, but by creating a character who, with infinite patience jockeys his enemies into a position where he can deliver one good knockout punch.'

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0xa4c1c954) out of 5 stars 35 reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa4bfc990) out of 5 stars Lucky to Get It Jan. 12 2013
By L. Buell - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Perry Mason solves another one! He knows the law and how to push it as far as he can, bending it to the benefit of his innocent (naturally) client without actually breaking it. He is scrupulous in a just-shy-of-unscrupulous way. Ends justifying the means, perhaps?

Ethical questions notwithstanding, Gardner is ever entertaining. His language is crisp, plots endlessly twisting, and characters deliciously villainous or improbably naive. Forgive him his stereotypes (racial, gender, or whatever) because he was a reflection of his times.

Despite Gardner's frequently sexist portrayals of damsels in distress, one of his strongest and most interesting characters is none other than Della Street. She ran the show but was wise enough to not let on to her single-minded boss who would rattle off a litany of orders, confident she would get them all down on her steno pad, finish them on an impossibly short timeline, and never have a hair out of place. She was his defensive tackle who ran interference for him without ever showing a single ruffled feather. The soul of discretion, she would make the most secure information vault pale in comparison to her secret-keeping abilities. No wonder she remained 'Miss Street' all those years--there way no way she had a life outside that office. But we loved her for it.

These books from Earl Stanley Gardner are kind of a time capsule. You might enjoy references to 'expensive $5.00 ties,' or dropping a nickle into a pay phone. And no matter how dangerous the world seemed to them, it feels nostalgic and safe to visit now.

So if you want a (somewhat predictable) brain teaser, interesting (though somewhat stereotypical) characters, and a hero who is equal parts anti-hero, you'll enjoy these books. Take them for what they are and enjoy!
HASH(0xa4f568dc) out of 5 stars The Beauty Contest Fraud Aug. 6 2015
By Acute Observer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The Case of the Lucky Legs

A note from the author tells about the bygone days when this story takes place. The early Perry Mason was not a stickler for the finer points of legal ethics, individual initiative counted to make a dramatic story. Other novels over the years warned of the beauty contest scams.

Mr. J. R. Bradbury visited Perry Mason about a telegram and a picture. Promoter Frank Patton held a contest to pick the girl with “Lucky Legs” and sold scrip to merchants so they could get a share of the profits in a movie company. Marjorie Clune was sent to Hollywood, given a screen test, then her contract was canceled. It was a legal fraud. Bradbury wants Perry to find Marjorie and put Patton behind bars when he confesses to fraud (Chapter 1). Perry gets information from the D.A.’s office (Chapter 2). He plots strategy with Paul Drake. This racket must have been used elsewhere (Chapter 3). Perry goes to visit Patton and sees a distressed young woman leaving (Chapter 5). Patton’s door is unlocked, Perry enters and finds a bloody knife near the body! As he leaves a police officer shows up because of a complaint. Perry calls his office to check on his client. Next he visits Thelma Bell to find Marjorie Clune (Chapter 6). The conversations carry the story forward, and explain strategy.

Perry meets his client Bradbury to exchange information (Chapter 7). Perry discusses the case with Della Street (Chapter 8). Who impersonated Della Street to warn Dr. Doray (Chapter 9)? Who gave information to Paul Drake and where did he get it (Chapter 10)? Perry checked on Thelma’s alibi. Perry is very active that night (Chapter 11). The police like Dr. Doray for the murder. Bradbury commands Perry to defend Dr. Doray and get an acquittal (Chapter 12). [What clew sent Perry after the mail plane?] Perry charters an airplane to Summerville on a search (Chapter 13). This is a crisis for Marjorie and Bob Doray! Perry acts to gain time to question Marjorie (Chapter 14). Then he smuggles her out of the hotel (Chapter 15). Perry finds out who was talking to the Drake Detective Bureau (Chapter 16). Marjorie knows her! Perry gets a record of Bradbury’s local telephone calls! There is a showdown in Perry’s office with Bradbury and two police detectives (Chapter 17). The police want to arrest Perry (Chapter 18)! Perry explains all he knows or surmises to the three detectives. This solves the murder mystery. The last chapter ties up the loose ends.

This is the early Perry Mason who solves crimes like a private investigator. No courtroom scenes. Perry is more rough and gritty too. Della has more spirit, Paul more independence. They do not work like a well-oiled machine as in the later novels. The meeting at the end when the case is solved was typical of many mystery novels and films from that era.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa4c02e04) out of 5 stars The Beauty Contest Fraud June 10 2015
By Acute Observer - Published on Amazon.com
The Case of the Lucky Legs

A note from the author tells about the bygone days when this story takes place. The early Perry Mason was not a stickler for the finer points of legal ethics, individual initiative counted to make a dramatic story. Other novels over the years warned of the beauty contest scams.

Mr. J. R. Bradbury visited Perry Mason about a telegram and a picture. Promoter Frank Patton held a contest to pick the girl with “Lucky Legs” and sold scrip to merchants so they could get a share of the profits in a movie company. Marjorie Clune was sent to Hollywood, given a screen test, then her contract was canceled. It was a legal fraud. Bradbury wants Perry to find Marjorie and put Patton behind bars when he confesses to fraud (Chapter 1). Perry gets information from the D.A.’s office (Chapter 2). He plots strategy with Paul Drake. This racket must have been used elsewhere (Chapter 3). Perry goes to visit Patton and sees a distressed young woman leaving (Chapter 5). Patton’s door is unlocked, Perry enters and finds a bloody knife near the body! As he leaves a police officer shows up because of a complaint. Perry calls his office to check on his client. Next he visits Thelma Bell to find Marjorie Clune (Chapter 6). The conversations carry the story forward, and explain strategy.

Perry meets his client Bradbury to exchange information (Chapter 7). Perry discusses the case with Della Street (Chapter 8). Who impersonated Della Street to warn Dr. Doray (Chapter 9)? Who gave information to Paul Drake and where did he get it (Chapter 10)? Perry checked on Thelma’s alibi. Perry is very active that night (Chapter 11). The police like Dr. Doray for the murder. Bradbury commands Perry to defend Dr. Doray and get an acquittal (Chapter 12). [What clew sent Perry after the mail plane?] Perry charters an airplane to Summerville on a search (Chapter 13). This is a crisis for Marjorie and Bob Doray! Perry acts to gain time to question Marjorie (Chapter 14). Then he smuggles her out of the hotel (Chapter 15). Perry finds out who was talking to the Drake Detective Bureau (Chapter 16). Marjorie knows her! Perry gets a record of Bradbury’s local telephone calls! There is a showdown in Perry’s office with Bradbury and two police detectives (Chapter 17). The police want to arrest Perry (Chapter 18)! Perry explains all he knows or surmises to the three detectives. This solves the murder mystery. The last chapter ties up the loose ends.

This is the early Perry Mason who solves crimes like a private investigator. No courtroom scenes. Perry is more rough and gritty too. Della has more spirit, Paul more independence. They do not work like a well-oiled machine as in the later novels. The meeting at the end when the case is solved was typical of many mystery novels and films from that era.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa4eaa714) out of 5 stars Great Yarn, Awful Writing May 15 2015
By RickW - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Erle Stanley Gardner drives me slightly crazy. On the one hand, he spun great yarns. On the other hand, the prose is awful. So you want to keep reading to see how the yarn turns out, and you're constantly annoyed by the writing. One issue is that everyday activities are described in excruciating detail. He can't just say "Perry Mason telephoned Paul Drake". He has to say something along the lines of "Perry Mason picked up the black receiver from its cradle and tucked it under his chin. He reached out with his right hand and used his index finger in the rotary dial to call Paul Drake's number. He listened as the ring signal repeated three times whereupon Drake picked up the phone at his end." etc. etc. Boy, I'm glad I got that off my chest. Net net: good yarn, annoying writing, some insight into the original 1930s Perry Mason character, much rougher edged than in later novels.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa4c025f4) out of 5 stars The Beauty Contest Fraud Oct. 30 2009
By Acute Observer - Published on Amazon.com
The Case of the Lucky Legs

A note from the author tells about the bygone days when this story takes place. The early Perry Mason was not a stickler for the finer points of legal ethics, individual initiative counted to make a dramatic story. Other novels over the years warned of the beauty contest scams.

Mr. J. R. Bradbury visited Perry Mason about a telegram and a picture. Promoter Frank Patton held a contest to pick the girl with "Lucky Legs" and sold scrip to merchants so they could get a share of the profits in a movie company. Marjorie Clune was sent to Hollywood, given a screen test, then her contract was canceled. It was a legal fraud. Bradbury wants Perry to find Marjorie and put Patton behind bars when he confesses to fraud (Chapter 1). Perry gets information from the D.A.'s office (Chapter 2). He plots strategy with Paul Drake. This racket must have been used elsewhere (Chapter 3). Perry goes to visit Patton and sees a distressed young woman leaving (Chapter 5). Patton's door is unlocked, Perry enters and finds a bloody knife near the body! As he leaves a police officer shows up because of a complaint. Perry calls his office to check on his client. Next he visits Thelma Bell to find Marjorie Clune (Chapter 6). The conversations carry the story forward, and explain strategy.

Perry meets his client Bradbury to exchange information (Chapter 7). Perry discusses the case with Della Street (Chapter 8). Who impersonated Della Street to warn Dr. Doray (Chapter 9)? Who gave information to Paul Drake and where did he get it (Chapter 10)? Perry checked on Thelma's alibi. Perry is very active that night (Chapter 11). The police like Dr. Doray for the murder. Bradbury commands Perry to defend Dr. Doray and get an acquittal (Chapter 12). [What clew sent Perry after the mail plane?] Perry charters an airplane to Summerville on a search (Chapter 13). This is a crisis for Marjorie and Bob Doray! Perry acts to gain time to question Marjorie (Chapter 14). Then he smuggles her out of the hotel (Chapter 15). Perry finds out who was talking to the Drake Detective Bureau (Chapter 16). Marjorie knows her! Perry gets a record of Bradbury's local telephone calls! There is a showdown in Perry's office with Bradbury and two police detectives (Chapter 17). The police want to arrest Perry (Chapter 18)! Perry explains all he knows or surmises to the three detectives. This solves the murder mystery. The last chapter ties up the loose ends.

This is the early Perry Mason who solves crimes like a private investigator. No courtroom scenes. Perry is more rough and gritty too. Della has more spirit, Paul more independence. They do not work like a well-oiled machine as in the later novels. The meeting at the end when the case is solved was typical of many mystery novels and films from that era.

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