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Charly [Import]

3.8 out of 5 stars 30 customer reviews

Price: CDN$ 110.00 & FREE Shipping. Details
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Product Details

  • Actors: Cliff Robertson, Claire Bloom, Lilia Skala, Leon Janney, Ruth White
  • Directors: Ralph Nelson
  • Writers: Daniel Keyes, Stirling Silliphant
  • Producers: Ralph Nelson, Selig J. Seligman
  • Format: Closed-captioned, Color, DVD-Video, Full Screen, Subtitled, Widescreen, NTSC, Import
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English, Spanish, French
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada This DVD will probably NOT be viewable in other countries. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: PG
  • Studio: MGM (Video & DVD)
  • Release Date: March 31 2005
  • Run Time: 103 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars 30 customer reviews
  • ASIN: B0002KPHWY
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Product Description

A retarded adult male struggling to survive in the world consents to an experiment to raise his intelligence.
Genre: Feature Film-Drama
Rating: PG
Release Date: 8-MAR-2005
Media Type: DVD

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
A daring movie for it's time. Yet totally fitting as well. How quick our hearts go out to mentally challenged children. Yet we still have disdain and fear when it comes to retarded adults. Simple, stupid, slow, easy to take advantage of, and easy to ignore. The film sadly is mired in some of the 60's fad's, such as split screens, psychedelic disco's and biker gangs, and 'ghosts of the past' that start appearing as Charly degrades. Sometimes a bit comical by today's standards, yet still has an overall impact when the end is reached. Cliff Robertson does a respectful job of a mentally challenged grown man. Not overly drooling and laughing as one might expect a old retard to be. But as a determined, hardworking, and friendly person that wants to break out of his mental confines. And his transformation to a intellectual scholar, yet still being a young child not understanding sex, contempt, expectations and self interest is just as well done. Claire Bloom is also great as the sympathetic teacher that almost models Charly to be her perfect man through her encouragement and support. And such a bittersweet ending, that still brings a tear to my eye. Yes, the book is more in depth and exceptional. But for a digested cinematic version, I didn't find this too far from the mark. Not overly wrought in sympathy, exploitation, romance, or science fiction. Just a simple man's journey to experience the full meaning of life and love, only to learn he can't beat natures natural faults.
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Format: VHS Tape
I am a great fan of Keyes' work, and one of my favorite books was Flowers for Algernon, which this movie is based off of. Well, I was very excited to be able to see this book put into life on the screeen, only to be terribly dissapointed. I'm rating this movie by the book it was compared to, and in relation to "Flower's for Algeernon" this movie was terrible. The movie totally left out half of the book, and made a disgrace of what they put into it. I also felt Cliff Roberstson portrayed Charly poorly. Three of the main Characters were totally left out of the movie, which affected what little of a plot they had left. They also altered the ending from the books. Overall I feel claiming this movie was based on "Flowers for Algernon" is an insult to the book. So, my advice, buy the book, burn the movie.
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Format: VHS Tape
Remember a piece of sentimental dreck called "Powder" (an "uplifting" nineties movie) about a kid who attracted lighting, was a genius, and loved animals? How about that John Travolta flick about a man who has a tumor that makes him smart (another "uplifting" nineties movie)? Naturally both (the characters, not the actors unfortunately) are hounded to tragic (but upliftingly-tragic, not sad-tragic) endings by the mob of intolerant villagers afraid of their "special powers".
Of course that was a few years ago. Now we have the new-age touchy-feely let's-get-spiritual nonsense of "K-Pax" to keep us home on a Friday night. Ah, the evolution of American Film.
Well it's (...) like this, that makes me really appreciate Charly for the gem that it is.
Like any good Welshman, director Ralph Nelson (Lilies Of The Field, Soldier Blue) will never use three words when ten will do. I don't know for sure that he's Welsh (in fact I'm alnost certain he isn't), but he certainly has something to say.
In a nutshell: mentally retarded man gets IQ boosting operation, only to realize the fix isn't permanent.
"Charly" is part of that golden era of "legitimate" Science Fiction: films where ideas and intelligence were still important and dramatization was still taken seriously. It makes a good book-end to "Colossus: The Forbin Project" and "The Andromeda Strain", and it asks if ethical/moral/social responsibility can keep pace with technology (this is something to think about, now that scientists are busy patenting our genes for their own commercial gain).
Daniel Keyes original short story was evolved into a teleplay, then a novel (1966) and then this feature (1968). Keyes had several years and many drafts to get the book right.
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Format: VHS Tape
"Charly" is based on Daniel Keyes's short story turned into a novel "Flowers for Algernon." The story was about Charly Gordon, a man who, in the parlance of the time, was mentally retarded. As part of a scientific experiment he is given a drug that turns him into a genius. The Algernon of the title is a lab rat who was the first guinea pig for this treatment. However, the treatment proves to be only temporary. Both versions of Keyes's story were done as diary entries, which provided a graphic indication of how Charly is changing.
The 1968 movie version, of course, opens up the story and gets away from the first-person perspective that made "Flowers for Algernon" so compelling. To add insult to injury, there is now a romance between Charly with a character named Alice Kinian (Claire Bloom). Of course, this changes the whole dynamic of the film, at the cost of the poignancy of Charly's relationship with Algernon. As the title character Cliff Robertson won the Oscar and clearly the problem is not with his performance but rather with Stirling Silliphant's screenplay. Still, to be fair, any film adaptation of the fragile original story was going to lose what made it so great.
Consequently, this is one of those films that you will enjoy more if you have not read "Flowers for Algernon." Of course, if you have not read either the short story or the novel, you should. At least this was an intelligence "science fiction" film for its day, certainly a more human story than other films of that era, such as "2001: A Space Odyssey."
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