No Kindle device required. Download one of the Free Kindle apps to start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, and computer.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Kindle Price: CDN$ 11.99
includes free international wireless delivery via Amazon Whispernet

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

The Cider House Rules by [Irving, John]
Kindle App Ad

The Cider House Rules Kindle Edition

4.3 out of 5 stars 317 customer reviews

See all 25 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
CDN$ 11.99

Kindle Monthly Deals
Each month we unveil a new collection of Kindle books for $3.99 or less. Deals expire on the last day of the month. See more.

Product Description

Review

"The Cider House Rules is difficult to define and impossible not to admire" Daily Telegraph "John Irving has been compared with Kurt Vonnegut and J. D. Salinger but is arguably more inventive than either. Wry, laconic, he sketches his characters with an economy that springs from a feeling for words and mastery over his craft. This superbly original book is one to be read and remembered" The Times "Funnier than Garp...it's an irresistibly readable yarn spun by a master's voice" Time Out "Like the rest of Irving's fiction, it is often disconcerting, but always exciting and provoking" Observer

Product Description

First published in 1985 by William Morrow, The Cider House Rules is John Irving's sixth novel. Set in rural Maine in the first half of the twentieth century, it tells the story of Dr. Wilbur Larch—saint and obstetrician, founder and director of the orphanage in the town of St. Cloud's, ether addict and abortionist. It is also the story of Dr. Larch's favorite orphan, Homer Wells, who is never adopted.


Product Details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1846 KB
  • Print Length: 612 pages
  • Publisher: William Morrow; 1st edition (July 31 2012)
  • Sold by: HarperCollins Publishers CA
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B008K556BK
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars 317 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #30,318 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

click to open popover

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Great writing from this well-known author! It's a multi-character story with such an unusual plot. Not an action novel, but rather a "follow the life" story of the protagonist as he makes his way through life, interacting with lots of different people. Unique way to write a story.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
Format: Audio Cassette
A captivating story about life in the 1920's-1930's told in a powerful and brilliantly written fictional novel about an orphan named Homer Wells and the St. Cloud orphanage. Dr. Wilbur Larch, who is an obstetrician on staff at St. Cloud's, is an ether addict who performs abortions at the orphanage secretly. He is known to say, "women come here to have an orphan or an abortion".
The story, though simple, is thought provoking. It contains many underlying themes about human nature, social injustices and the complexities of life. Written to be shocking and graphic, Irving uses the characters to express each theme as he tells the story. One such theme is "we all break the rules"... Another theme is "the realities of life can influence you to make a practical rather than a moral decision"... and this is what happens to Homer Wells...
A fascinating book! Highly recommend!
2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This review is based on the paperback version 1985

The movie debut a few years back was great, excellent actors represented the characters, cinematography and technical details were solid.
The book is a lot more involved, with more in-depth events in the story that are left out of the movie.
However, readers are missing out on a lot of John Irving's writing talent if they fail to read the book. A reader grows to know Irving's players in a way not many authors create and allow the reader to absorb each character -- some readers put the book in a negative light by stating that the characters and issues are unrealistic... Whoa! That is definitely NOT the case. The issues existed then as they exist now and are in our sight always.
The setting is State of Maine, an orphanage named St. Cloud's -- Dr. Wilbur Larch, orphan Homer Wells, and the relationship of their bonding. All characters deserve and are allowed compassion enhanced with understanding. Sub-plots are woven gracefully into the story assisting the main essence of the theme. John Irving gives credence to issues in The Cider House Rules: abortion, friendship, family, love, loyalty, humor to laugh to, and tears to cry with. John Irving has ecome one of my top ten favorite authors. John Irving was born in Exeter, NH, resides in NY, and has also authored "Hotel New Hampshire" & "The World According to Garp"... and more.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
By A Customer on Aug. 25 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I thoroughly enjoyed this book, and I doubt I will ever forget it. (If I find myself forgetting it, I'll probably just read it again!) John Irving does a wonderful job of drawing the reader into the lives of the characters, who he describes so well I can see them as if they were in front of me. Throughout the book, I was torn between wanting to know how the story would develop and not wanting the story to progress a single moment into the future, because I was enjoying whatever was happening in the present. At times I found myself surprised, while at other times the story was more predictable, only because of Irving's excellent use of foreshadowing. I found that every time I put the book down, I could not keep my mind off of the characters, the events of their lives, and the themes of the book. I was impressed by how well crafted the novel was, and I can't wait to read the rest of Irving's work.
I would recommend this book for:
- anyone willing to take their time with a great book that slowly (and excellently) advances the story
- anyone who is open-minded about the issue of abortion or at least willing to read about the topic
I would NOT recommend this book for:
- anyone who wants a quick, lite, or formulaic read
- anyone who will be offended or disgusted by abortion or the graphic details of obstetrical procedure
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I am a big fan of John Irving and I have read Garp and Owen Meany, among others, but this novel stands head and shoulders above the rest of his works. It is his most well-written and complete novels. The author addresses the difficult subject of abortion brilliantly. The reader is transported into early 20th century New England and kept riveted by a blend of comedy, drama, romance, and vintage Irving storytelling. You will experience a huge range of emotions while reading this book, and when you are finished, you will want to pick it up and read it again. The movie does not do this book justice at all. The characters are all richly developed, from the bullying Melony to the kind-hearted abortionist Dr. Larch to the eternal orphan Homer Wells. The ending is brilliantly conceived and the novel is beautifully written throughout. My only complaint is that for all of his creativity in his storytelling, it seems that he has taken two main themes and a handful of stock characters and tried to write a dozen novels about them. Still this is a five -star effort in my book. If you only read one novel by Irving, this should be the one.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is the third book I've read of Irving's after Garp and Owen Meany ... all are excellent books. As always, Irving created a memorable cast of characters and a plot that is both interesting and well-researched. Cider House is not only a great story, but a great commentary on the issue of abortion.
The only thing that keeps me from giving Cider House 5 stars is my disappointment with Homer Wells as an adult. As a child, Homer seems fated to have some kind of terrible destiny (like Owen Meany) but when it comes down to it, Homer never truly made a decision on his own until the end of the book. His life as a youth is orchestrated by the opposing forces of Dr. Larch (my favorite person in the book) and Melony ... his love for Candy controls the next 15 ... and finally it is his decision to help Rose Rose that gets him back to St. Cloud's ... but even then it's under a fake name, and again even this is largely instigated by the guilt that Melony makes him feel. Homer never escapes his destiny as an orphan who seems largely deprived on any free will of his own. He's the "Right" Man ... the guy who agrees with everyone without being committal.
Overall Cider House is a very good book ... but I couldn't help but think that a slightly stronger main character would've made the story more cohesive. Homer struggles with the question of whether he is the hero of his own life ... I would without hesitation say no: it is Dr. Larch. Still, a good book, but probably not Irving's best.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse

Most recent customer reviews