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Codename: Zosha: A Woman Fighter Against the Nazis (World War 2 Memories) by [Kafri, Yehudit]
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Codename: Zosha: A Woman Fighter Against the Nazis (World War 2 Memories) Kindle Edition

5.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

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Length: 439 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Product Description

Product Description

An unsung Jewish heroine of World War II

Her daring activity in the Red Orchestra and the heroic struggle in a Gestapo prison.

Zosha Poznanska was recruited into the Soviet spy network known as the Red Orchestra, which operated in Western Europe. It was on the eve of World Rar II and Zosha was part of the inner core of the network, a third of whose members were Jews. Apparently unaware of the Jews' participation in the Red Orchestra, Hitler declared, "The Bolsheviks surpass us in one area alone: espionage!" and he commanded his counterspies to eradicate this network at all costs.

This book tells the story of Zosha through all the chapters of her short life: childhood, the Hashomer Hatzair youth movement in Poland, Eretz Israel and the PKP in the 1920s, Europe in the 1930s and the Red Orchestra. It tells her loves, her relationships with family and friends, her daring activity in the Red Orchestra and her heroic struggle in a Gestapo prison. The State of Israel posthumously awarded Zosha a medal of honor for fighting the Nazis.

Zosha Poznanska is an unsung Jewish heroine of World War II. Born in Kalisz Poland, she immigrated to Israel as a pioneer and for a brief time belonged to the group that founded Kibbutz Mishmar Ha'emek. Afterwards, she joined the Palestine Communist Party (Palestiner Kumunistishe Partie in Yiddish, abbreviated PKP), and from 1930 until her death she lived in France and Belgium.

˃˃˃ A prize for top literary achievement

The book is written as a biographical novel and relies on exhaustive research; all fictional passages are derived from and based on extensive documentation. It was awarded the 2004 prize for top literary achievement, by the Society of Authors, Composers and Music Publishers in Israel (ACUM).

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About the Author

Yehudit Kafri Meiri is a 20th–21st century Israeli poet and a writer, as well as editor and translator. She was born in 1935 and lived as a child in Kibbutz Ein HaHoresh, where her parents were founding members. Yehudit belonged to the first group of children born in this kibbutz. After she got married, she moved to Kibbutz Sasa, where she wrote her first book, The Time Will Have Mercy, which was published in 1962, one year after she moved to Kibbutz Shoval with her family. In Kibbutz Shoval she published a few more poetry books and children's books and made her first attempt at writing prose including a book describing her childhood memories, All The Summer We Went Barefoot, which was successful and sold several editions. Yehudit Kafri, mother of three and grandmother of four, has lived since 1989 with her husband in Mazkeret Batya, where she continues to write and publish books of poetry and biographies. In 2003 she published an historical biographic novel, Zosha: from the Jezreel Valley to the Red Orchestra, which tells the life story of Zosha Poznanska, who was a member of the Red Orchestra and eventually killed by the Gestapo. This novel won The Best Literary Achievement of the Year Prize in Israel. It has since been translated and published in English, and in Polish, and lately in Amazon. Kafri published 9 poetry books and 9 others (children's books, biographies, and prose). Poems by Yehudit Kafri were published in Hebrew, Arabic, English, Spanish, Croatian and Russian. Kafri has won several literary prizes including the Prime Minister's prize in 1987, and other scholarship prizes.

Product Details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 6114 KB
  • Print Length: 439 pages
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00PLUSYHU
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #141,522 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This was a very moving read. I found myself feeling emotional as I read this biography but Yehudit Kafri. Kafri is incredibly talented and really knows how to keep the reader engaged while tugging at all the right heart strings. This is far from a light read. I found myself pausing to reflect on Zosha's experiences. What a courageous woman.. I found myself fascinated by her character and strength.
I am so glad that I picked up this novel and learned about Zosha. She truly was a heroine! To learn of a woman so courageous, not afraid to push past all her challenges and fight for her beliefs,was very empowering!
This was an emotional glimpse into Israel and there is no surprise that it was awarded the 2004 prize for top literary achievement, by the Society of Authors, Composers and Music Publishers in Israel (ACUM).
For a very thought provoking read, I recommend Codename: Zosha
*I received this book in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0xa5ba2588) out of 5 stars 49 reviews
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa57fa0f0) out of 5 stars A remarkable tale Nov. 21 2014
By Julie Phelps - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
This incredibly talented author has done an amazing job here. Her investigation into Zosha's life is remarkable in itself, but her presentation is truly gripping. The author's delicate touch brings to life the tale of this young woman's largely unglamorous life through a variety of methods, some of which will take you by surprise. At times the story is, at times, harrowing, but the sense of danger is ever-present. You will find it enthralling.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa57fa0e4) out of 5 stars It is in Hashomer Hatzair that Zosha meets her first love, Fishek (who is also the author's father and ... Aug. 15 2015
By The Literary Maven - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This biographical novel details the life of Zosha Poznanska, a little known Jewish WWII heroine. The novel begins at the turn of the 20th century with Zosha's childhood in Poland. She grows up with two siblings, an older brother and a younger sister, and lives with her grandparents and emotionally distant father. Her mother is emotionally fragile and spends most of Zosha's life in a mental institution. As a youth, Zosha is active in the Hashomer Hatzair youth movement, which advocated the immigration of Jewish youth to Palestine to form kibbutzes. It is in Hashomer Hatzair that Zosha meets her first love, Fishek (who is also the author's father and it is the relationship between Zosha and Fishek that drives the author's desire to write this book).

Once Zosha travels to Palestine and joins a kibbutz, she realizes that this is not quite the life they dreamed of in the youth group back in Poland. Their living conditions are primitive, there is little work which means little money and little food, and she is most disturbed to learn that their land was basically taken from Arabs. She begins to be exposed to the ideas of Communism and eventually leaves the kibbutz to work for the Communist Party in Palestine and eventually in Europe.

As WWII draws near, the Communist Party's efforts shift to become anti-Nazi efforts and Zosha becomes part of the Red Orchestra, an espionage. While all of her assignments are not known, her final role was as an encryptor of messages transmitted to the Soviet Union. Zosha and the other individuals involved in the transmissions are discovered by the Gestapo and taken to prison, where Zosha spend the last nine months of her life leading up to her death, a suicide.

So if you read that plot summary, you know that there is nothing cheerful about this book. Nothing. I also found the first half of the novel incredibly slow (likely increased by my lack of knowledge and interest in Zionism and Communism) and at times confusing because of the many names mentioned. The author also jumps between past and present, which is marked with dates, but at other times inserts her thoughts, feelings, and what she wishes she could have said.

The pacing of the plot and my interest picked up as events drew closer to WWII. The espionage efforts are a facet of WWII I know little about and Zosha's complete commitment to the anti-Nazi cause is incredible. While her choices in romance through the novel are sometimes questionable, her courage and selflessness are unassailable.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa57f8a68) out of 5 stars Compelling and intimate portrait of a Jewish heroine Feb. 12 2015
By Kitty Smith - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Every now and then I come across a novel that has a profound impact on me, to the point I'm left contemplating it long after I've set it aside. "Codename: Zosha" is one of those. It is rare that we are given a glimpse into the lives of the many Jewish heros of that era, rarer still that the hero be a woman. Kafri has delivered a compelling, gripping portrait of a young woman turned Soviet spy during the second world war, and the no doubt exhaustive research that went into this story is evident in every page. The photos in particular serve to draw you into Zosha's world, and admittedly it is a world I have known little about until now. Her life is intimately documented, from her personal relationships to her exploits with the Red Orchestra, and the presentation is so complete and realistic that I feel connected to this woman. As others have noted, this is deserving of the big screen, but barring that I hope this book finds a wide audience.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa57fa27c) out of 5 stars Intriguing Read Aug. 31 2015
By Melissa Corbeil (Inspired Leo Goddess) - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
This was a very moving read. I found myself feeling emotional as I read this biography but Yehudit Kafri. Kafri is incredibly talented and really knows how to keep the reader engaged while tugging at all the right heart strings. This is far from a light read. I found myself pausing to reflect on Zosha's experiences. What a courageous woman.. I found myself fascinated by her character and strength.
I am so glad that I picked up this novel and learned about Zosha. She truly was a heroine! To learn of a woman so courageous, not afraid to push past all her challenges and fight for her beliefs,was very empowering!
This was an emotional glimpse into Israel and there is no surprise that it was awarded the 2004 prize for top literary achievement, by the Society of Authors, Composers and Music Publishers in Israel (ACUM).
For a very thought provoking read, I recommend Codename: Zosha
*I received this book in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa57ea2ac) out of 5 stars Codename: Zosha Aug. 27 2015
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
When it comes to reading books I'm generally not a picky person, but I do enjoy reading books that take place during World War II among other genres/topics. Naturally I thought that this book would be great but, for me I thought that it was a bit hard to follow. It often left me confused with what was going on in the book. In my opinion I think that the development of the characters could have been better. I did not complete the book, it was difficult to continue it, but since I do have this on my Kindle app I may try to finish it at a later time. I personally do not recommend this book if you like a fast paced book, but if you do enjoy reading about WWI/II and espionage, then maybe this book might be for you.

I received this product for free for reviewing purposes. All opinions are my own.