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Come & See [Import]

4.4 out of 5 stars 62 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Actors: Aleksey Kravchenko, Olga Mironova, Liubomiras Laucevicius, Vladas Bagdonas, Jüri Lumiste
  • Directors: Elem Klimov
  • Writers: Elem Klimov, Ales Adamovich
  • Format: Color, DVD-Video, Subtitled, NTSC, Import
  • Language: German, Russian
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada This DVD will probably NOT be viewable in other countries. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: UNRATED
  • Studio: Kino Lorber films
  • Release Date: March 22 2007
  • Run Time: 140 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars 62 customer reviews
  • ASIN: B0000BWVCR
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Product Description

Come & See

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
I had to write this review in response to the comments below which denigrate this magnificent film as Communist propaganda. First, I think we should separate politics from art. "Battleship Potemkin" and "Triumph of the Will" are two masterpieces that support evil regimes. Yet we can appreciate their technical and artistic skill without becoming Communists or Nazis.

Second, "Come and See" is an accurate historical portrayal of a Nazi massacre of a Belarussian village. While I sympathize with the fact that we hear next to nothing about the Communist massacres, and are inundated with news about the Nazi massacres due to the Holocaust, we should not attack the film on such grounds. Somebody should get up and make a film about the rape of Germany at the hands of Soviets if they are so inclined.

Last, "Come and See" is astounding cinema. The tracking shots and surreal atmosphere are brilliantly rendered. This film is a cross between "Apocalypse Now" and "Schindler's List" and equally good if not better. The lead performance by the teenage actor Aleksei Kravchenko is awesome. "Come and See" is one of the most harrowing movies ever made, and should be watched by everyone.
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Format: DVD
I saw this movie in Paris about 15 years ago. Just happened upon it, playing at an obscure theater, and decided to give it a try. I had never seen a Russian WW II movie and was curious to see how they handled it. Seeing the film like that with no foreknowledge or preparation was a devastating experience -- it was frighteningly moving and depicted war in a way I'd never thought possible.
The film made a big impression on me. The years passed, and occasionally I would think about the film. I didn't really even know its title in English (as I said, I saw it in France, with Russian soundtrack and French subtitles).
I happened to come across references to the film recently on the web, so I went to Amazon.com's site (and other on-line sellers of videos) to see if it was available, and, to my surprise here it is.
The problem is that, because this film is so heavy and, in many ways, disturbing, I'm going to have to think about obtaining it and seeing it again. Maybe it was best to have come across it by chance one evening in Paris, and leave it at that . . . .
But for all of you who are wondering about this film, see it. It will likely have a profound effect on you.
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Format: DVD
4.5 Stars
Although initially sceptical regarding this movie's historical accuracy as it was a Soviet era production, after watching it I thought this film to be a very honest and sobering portrayal of the war on the Eastern Front, between Hitler's Germany and the Soviet Union during WWII. The movie depicts an often overlooked facet of the war, specifically the activites of the SS "Einsatzgruppen," or special action police units, whose task was to liquidate Jews, communists, and any potential threats to the Nazi regime behind the front lines of the actual fighting. These SS police units travelled behind the army's advance, and in addition to conducting mass executions of Jews and suspected communists, were also employed to "pacify" occupied regions that were suspected of taking part in, or aiding, the growing underground resistance. The activites of such an SS unit provides the background to the movie as the main character, a young teenage boy, loses his parents and survives the razing of a Russian village - a scene quite unpleasant to watch, yet very well depicted and brutal in its realism. Of mention was the role played by local Russian militia in carrying out these executions and "reprisal" raids - as this is a Soviet film, and was subject to state oversight, I was surprised that such unpleasant reminders of Russian collaboration were incorporated. Large numbers of volunteers from the occupied territories were accomplices to the SS in their cleansing actions, a fact documented in this movie.
"Come and See" also provides an interesting glimpse into the role and activities of the Soviet partisans, the insurgent groups fighting the Nazi occupation behind the front.
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Format: DVD
This is an expressionist, symbolist, realist, surrealist, and mystic movie. Wonderful poetry meets absolute horror. It might be one of those very few life-changing movies. A MUST SEE!
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Format: DVD
In 1943 Byelorussia, Florya (Aleksei Kravchenko), a 14-year-old boy who is eager to fight the Germans, goes off to join the Russian army, against the pleadings of his mother. But the regiment makes him stay behind at the camp, and he wanders off on his own, joined by a peasant girl (Olga Mironova). Rendered partially deaf by aerial bombardment, and evading capture from German paratroopers, he tries to return home, but fate guides him to a band of partisans, after which his journey leads him ever deeper into the inferno of the Nazi invasion.
The picture's rigorously subjective style, hallucinatory imagery, and refusal to soften or glamorize the realities of war, makes it something of a milestone in the Soviet World War II film, a genre distinguished, at its best, by a sense of grief over the great tragedy of that conflict, which killed an estimated twenty million Russians. In Byelorussia, the Germans systematically wiped out hundreds of towns, rounding men, women, and children into barns and burning them alive. By depicting these horrific events through the eye of a naive boy, Klimov gives them immediacy, elevating them above the mere recounting of historical fact into the heightened realm of an actual witnessing, where they appear strange, grotesque, and unbearable.
Kravchenko's almost wordless performance is riveting. Over the course of the film we see his face become aged beyond his years, hardening into a mask of fear and trauma that reflects every atrocity he has seen and endured. The film is constantly directing our attention to people's faces, their expressions, their stares and glances, which visually emphasizes the fact that all these horrors are happening to people, to someone, the unutterable limits of inhumanity experienced in the souls and feelings of living beings.
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