CDN$ 31.41
  • List Price: CDN$ 41.95
  • You Save: CDN$ 10.54 (25%)
Only 5 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca. Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Common Sense on Mutual Fu... has been added to your Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

Common Sense on Mutual Funds Hardcover – Dec 2 2009

4.5 out of 5 stars 27 customer reviews

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
CDN$ 31.41
CDN$ 30.52 CDN$ 36.06

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child
click to open popover


Frequently Bought Together

  • Common Sense on Mutual Funds
  • +
  • The Intelligent Investor: The Definitive Book on Value Investing
Total price: CDN$ 49.73
Buy the selected items together

No Kindle device required. Download one of the Free Kindle apps to start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, and computer.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product Details

  • Hardcover: 656 pages
  • Publisher: Wiley; 10 edition (Dec 2 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0470138130
  • ISBN-13: 978-0470138137
  • Product Dimensions: 16 x 3.8 x 23.6 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 975 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars 27 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #88,674 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  •  Would you like to update product info, give feedback on images, or tell us about a lower price?

  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

From Publishers Weekly

Not that many years ago, an average bookstore might have had two or three books on mutual funds filed away in the business section. Today, as the number of Americans who invest in mutual funds continues to grow, such books take up several aisles in a section of their own. There are guides for data junkies and mathphobes, books that tell how to make a killing and books that tell how to avoid the coming disaster. A few classics stand above the clutter. Bogle on Mutual Funds is one of them. Now the same author has added another. While the first book aimed at educating beginners, the new one seeks to persuade experienced investors to discard received wisdom that isn't so wise after all. While no 450-page work on mutual funds with lots of charts can be considered fun summer reading, the book is always informative and the writing never worse than painless and sometimes quite lively. Bogle speaks with a rare authority. On one hand, he is the founder of Vanguard mutual funds, the second-largest mutual fund company in the world. So he knows the business from the ground up. On the other hand, Vanguard has always been famous for running the lowest-cost mutual funds, funds that eschew loads, engage in sensible strategies and return all profit to the investors. So Bogle is also a leading consumer advocate. That rare combination, mixed with years of serious research and a dash of style, makes Bogle an unparalleled guide to the world of mutual funds. Money Book Club alternate.
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Inside Flap

John Bogle—founder of the Vanguard Mutual Fund Group and creator of the first index mutual fund—is an industry pioneer. Over the years, he has single-handedly transformed the mutual fund business, and today, his vision continues to inspire investors.

It has been over a decade since the original edition of Common Sense on Mutual Funds was first published. While much has changed during this time, the importance of investing and the issues addressed in the original edition of this book have not. Now, in the Fully Updated 10th Anniversary Edition of Common Sense on Mutual Funds, Bogle returns to update his in-depth look at mutual funds and the business of investing—helping you navigate through the staggering array of investment options found in today's evolving investment landscape.

Timely and timeless, this important book examines the fundamentals of mutual fund investing in turbulent market environments and offers valuable guidance for building an investment portfolio. Along the way, Bogle shows you that simplicity and common sense still trump costly complexity, and that a low cost, broadly diversified portfolio continues to be the best way to build wealth at the lowest cost and risk—and will almost always outperform more expensive, actively managed mutual funds.

Throughout these pages, Bogle skillfully presents a platform for intelligent investing as he analyzes costs, exposes tax inefficiencies, and warns of the mutual fund industry's conflicting interests. Emphasizing long-term investing and asset allocation, Bogle offers sensible solutions to the fund selection process and reveals what it will take to make it in today's chaotic market. Updated charts, which also show original data, as well as new commentary and analysis provide timely guidance in light of recent changes in investment vehicles and market performance.

Securing your financial future has never seemed more difficult, but after reading this revised and updated edition of Common Sense on Mutual Funds, you will become a better investor. From stock and bond funds to global investing and index funds, this book will help you regain your financial footing and make more informed investment decisions.

See all Product Description

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
Bogle has some very compelling points to make that would greatly simplify investment decisions and lower the stress levels of many investors. His main point--buy and hold a low-cost, tax-efficient, no-load, broadly-based U.S. market index fund for the long haul (hint: consider Vanguard)--could have been stated once or twice prominently instead of boringly dozens of times with endless charts and statistics. I also found his references to the stock market and inflation rates dating back to the 1800's to be largely irrelevant given the changes in the nature of the markets and economy since then. While Bogle makes a particularly good point about how management fees really eat into bond fund returns, he doesn't really acknowledge the long-term advantages to holding bonds outright over holding them in mutual funds at all. You can glean Bogle's key points of wisdom with a quick skim of the book; if you need to be convinced over and over and over again from different angles--and many of the same ones--then by all means consider this as good bedtime reading.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
A common problem that all of us have is that we believe ourselves to be able to produce superior results in virtually any area we try -- acting on that belief can cost you a fortune if it affects how you invest over your lifetime. By definition, half will be average or less, and half average or higher in most areas of human endeavor. When it comes to investing, however, the odds are not that good. If you choose the wrong asset class, you can make great choices and greatly lag the pack. If you choose the wrong way to invest with the right asset class, you can still do poorly. Mr. Bogle's book explains in remarkable detail (with lots of graphs and numbers to make the point) that almost everyone will lag the market averages for stocks over any multiple year period of time due to the effects of trading stocks, taxes, costs for money management, marketing expenses, and size of portfolio. Rather than despair, he points out that we can view this as an outstanding opportunity. We can simply buy indexed mutual funds (such as the ones that Vanguard, his firm, offers) and outperform 98-99 percent of everyone who invests for the long haul. Unlike other books where the author touts an activity that benefits him economically, Mr. Bogle's arguement is right. For anyone with less investment skill than Warren Buffett, S&P 500 and Wilshire 5000 index funds will be a terrific solution. New investors may find this book to have more information than they need or can easily absorb. People who think they know all the answers will find a lot of new material to cogitate about, usefully. Anyone who owns mutual funds is making a mistake if they do not read this book.Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
This book has some basic, common-sense and powerfull principles. It is full of technical detail that is sometimes hard to follow for the layman but nevertheless is explained simply enough to have the ring of truth about it.
It's basic principle is that for your investments to provide wealth in the long-term you must abandon the current casino-style gambing on the latest mutual fund fad and invest in solid, low-cost, no-load funds.
This book is not for the total beginner since it probably has too much detailed technical data for the few pearls of wisdom -- albeit priceless pearls. However, given the huge mutual fund industry that mostly disagree with John Bogle, the amount of technical information is probably necessary.
Unlike the four "Common Sense" pamphlets written by Thomas Paine to inspire the regular citizen to reject British imperialistic rule, this book is too technical to spark a popular uprising against the over-priced mutual fund industry of today. However the fact that Bogle practices what he preaches and has built a company 'Vanguard' on his beliefs gives his book an authority missing in much writing.
For the beginner, a book I read that really did change my life is "Personal Finance for Dummies" by Eric Tyson.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
This book struck me as an academic and unnecessarily complicated version of Eric Tyson's "Mutual Funds for Dummies". Both books recommend a common sense (and increasingly common) approach to investing that stresses the importance of long-term horizons, low expenses, and minimal turnover. The difference is that Bogle cloaks his "thesis" in so much jargon and gobbledy-gook that it often takes a couple readings just to figure out what he's trying to say. He's kidding himself if he thinks Main Street USA is going to get through this book. If his intent was to shake up American complacency a la Thomas Paine, I'm afraid he's failed miserably.
By the way, the book's jacket and first few pages are loaded with hyperactive rave reviews from some Big Names in the investment field. This seems awfully disingenuous when Bogle thanks almost all of them by name a couple pages later in the Acknowledgments section. Logrolling, anyone?
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
John Bogle is truly a guidance counselor of forelorn investors. We are whipsawed daily with a plethora of data which I am convinced, is only provided to confuse. His book, while seemingly too technical for my little brain, is a wonderful eye opening passage into the mutual fund arena. I have bought into the Vanguard story and indexing in the early part of this year and I am now systematically changing all my fund selections into Vanguard funds that are indexed. Low expenses, low turnover and indexing are the solutions for investors who want the best return for the least cost. I am sold. Thank you John Bogle for your insight. My heirs will also appreciate your wisdom in another 30 years for they will be the actual benefactors of the accumulation of my wealth.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse

Most recent customer reviews



Feedback