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In the Cut Audio Cassette – Audiobook, Oct 17 1995

2.8 out of 5 stars 69 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Audio Cassette
  • Publisher: Random House Audio (Oct. 17 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0679447628
  • ISBN-13: 978-0679447627
  • Product Dimensions: 1.9 x 11.4 x 17.8 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 136 g
  • Average Customer Review: 2.8 out of 5 stars 69 customer reviews
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Product description

From Publishers Weekly

Several stunning shocks await Moore's longtime readers in her fourth novel. First, there is the change of genre and locale. Her previous books (My Old Sweetheart; The Whiteness of Bones) have been lush, sensitive explorations of coming of age in a dysfunctional family in Hawaii, in an atmosphere permeated by island spirits and traditions. Here, Moore has honed her prose with knife-like precision to construct an edgy, intense, erotic thriller set in bohemian Manhattan. Her protagonist and narrator, Franny, is a divorced NYU professor deliberately closed off from emotional entanglements. She teaches a class for ghetto youth, meanwhile pursuing her obsession with language; she is writing a book recording the street vernacular and the black lingo of New York's seedier neighborhoods. Though on the surface her life seems circumscribed, she is a woman who takes risks, especially sexual risks. One night, she observes a man with a tattoo on his wrist in an act of sexual congress; though she does not see his face, she remembers the red-haired woman who had performed fellatio when she becomes a murder victim. Questioned as a possible witness by homicide detectives James Mallory and his partner Richard Rodriguez, she enjoys the frisson of danger when she takes Mallory as a lover, in spite of the fact that his wrist bears the same tattoo as that of the probable killer. The predatory, slightly corrupt Mallory is a coolly skillful lover, forcing Franny to push beyond sexual barriers into areas she has never explored. But in testing those erotic boundaries, she puts herself in mortal danger. Moore's control of her material is impressive: as she sweeps toward a knockout ending, she employs the gritty vernacular, red-herring clues and cold-blooded brutality of a bona-fide thriller without sacrificing the integrity of her narrative. The question is: will readers be disturbed?and perhaps repelled by?explicit descriptions of sexual acts, scatological language and gruesome violence? 100,000 first printing.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

Billed as an "erotic thriller," Moore's (Sleeping Beauties, LJ 9/1/93) latest is erotic, but it's certainly no thriller. The heroine is an English teacher who muses endlessly on the meanings of language, even at times when she should be experiencing intense emotion. She witnesses an event that leads to a grisly murder and becomes sexually involved with the cop investigating the case. Her closest friend, with whom she discusses sexual experiences in detail, is viciously murdered and mutilated by the same killer, and she herself falls victim, an interesting trick in a story told in the first person. Not only is the heroine distanced by language from her emotions, but so is the reader. Not recommended, although Moore has a following and larger collections may want to have a copy.?Marylaine Block, St. Ambrose Univ. Lib., Davenport, Ia.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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