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The Dain Curse Paperback – Jul 17 1989

3.6 out of 5 stars 16 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage Crime/Black Lizard; Vintage Books ed edition (July 17 1989)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0679722602
  • ISBN-13: 978-0679722601
  • Product Dimensions: 13.2 x 1.4 x 20.3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 181 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars 16 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #409,515 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

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Everything about the Leggett diamond heist indicated to the Continental Op that it was an inside job. From the stray diamond found in the yard to the eyewitness accounts of a "strange man" casing the house, everything was just too pat. Gabrielle Dain-Leggett has enough secrets to fill a closet, and when she disappears shortly after the robbery, she becomes the Op's prime suspect. But her father, Edgar Leggett, keeps some strange company himself and has a dark side the moon would envy. Before he can solve the riddle of the diamond theft, the Continental Op must first solve the mystery of this strange family.

From the Inside Flap

The Continental Op is a short, squat, and utterly unsentimental tank of a private detective. Miss Gabrielle Dain Leggett is young, wealthy, and a devotee of morphine and religious cults. She has an unfortunate effect on the people around her: they have a habit of dying violently. Is Gabrielle the victim of a family curse? Or is the truth about her weirder and infinitely more dangerous? The Dain Curse is one of the Continental Op's most bizarre cases, and a tautly crafted masterpiece of suspense.

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Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars
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Format: Paperback
The Dain Curse begins with a routine insurance investigation. Some moderately valuable diamonds were stolen and the Continental Op is put on the case to find the culprit. Not soon after, the Op learns that something larger is going on. The family he is investigating has some deep secrets and maybe even a curse follows them. The story takes place in three parts with three different mysteries, but they culminate to solve the Dain Curse, which is at the center of all the action.
I was introduced to the Continental Op a few years ago in short story form and loved the character quite a bit. I've been saving the novels for a few years and it was worth the wait. Hammett became famous for Sam Spade and the Thin man, but the Continental Op is deserving of more attention. He's not typically handsome and he's even short and fat, but he has enough brains an no how to get the job done.
A shame that Hammett got sucked into revolutionary politics and spent the last 30 years of his life writing nothing of value, because his early stuff is nothing less than Great American Literature.
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Format: Kindle Edition
The Continental Op’s (he’s never named) assignment is to investigate the theft of diamonds from the Leggett family home. When one of the two suspects is quickly found murdered, the Leggetts’ story about what really happened begins to unravel. As it does, the past and the present slowly reveal themselves in a quagmire of trouble.

For most novels, this would be enough material to fill one book, but for Dashiell Hammett, this is only the first of three parts that become steadily darker and seedier as the story progresses. The key figure in the book is Gabrielle Leggett, the confused, aloof daughter plagued by her own demons. Just when the Continental Op thinks he’s done with the family, he’s asked to watch over Gabrielle who’s recovering from tragedy at a Temple, which appears to be a religious cult. From there, things only get worse.

What can I say about Dashiell Hammett that hasn’t already been said? Having read his work after so many years, I understand why he’s considered one of the masters of the detective novel. It was a welcome change to read mystery that’s kicking it old style. There’s no hi-tech gimmicks in this story, just a lot of leg work and—on the downside--some sexism and racist slurs that were prevalent back then. Still, this whodunit will keep you guessing as hidden agendas and connections make a simple plot increasingly complex. Having said that, the twisted motivations and secret relationships in this book became so extensive that it stretched credibility by the end, however this won’t deter us true Hammett fans from reading more of his work.
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Format: Paperback
"The Dain Curse" originally appeared as 4 serials in "Black Mask" magazine, 1928-1929, and was reworked and published as a novel shortly thereafter. The novel impresses me more strongly as a soap opera in three acts than a detective story. Yes, there is a detective, the always nameless Continental Op. And there is certainly a mystery. There are a lot of mysteries, in fact. But "The Dain Curse" is the most far-fetched of Dashiell Hammett's works that I've read, and the least cynical of his novels. I wouldn't call this book well-written, but it's a page-turner. The plot is so convoluted that the reader is even more anxious than usual to read to the end in order to find out what our detective will make of it. And that's the heart of the novel's problems: We keep reading because we are curious to know how the Op will unravel this messy, incomprehensible case. We don't keep reading because we are interested in the characters, the story, or the language. Those elements are far less intriguing than I have come to expect from Hammett. Perhaps it's because Hammett strayed from the world of gangsters and thugs that he knew best, but "The Dain Curse"'s conglomeration of religious cults, drug addiction, melodrama, and bourgeois murder just isn't credible on any level. The central female character in the book, Gabrielle, is more of a damsel in distress than a femme fatale, and she is rather unattractive, physically and intellectually. There's nothing wrong with these things, in themselves, but they typify "The Dain Curse"'s departure from Dashiell Hammett's traditional themes and style. Unfortunately, if this novel was an experiment, it wasn't a very successful one. But I don't deny that it's entertaining on a certain level.Read more ›
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By EA Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on March 14 2004
Format: Paperback
Dashiell Hammett brought the noir detective into the limelight with "Maltese Falcon," but it wasn't the first or only novel he wrote about hard-edged, hard-boiled detectives. Among his early works was the Continental Op in "The Dain Curse," a scattered but interesting three-tier mystery.
Diamonds have been stolen, and the Continental Op has been called in to find out what has happened. But he finds that the whole story that is given to him has a "wrong" feeling to it -- mysterious men, a diamond he finds on the ground. When the Op digs further, he finds a web of murder, jealousy and hate that spreads back over young Gabrielle Leggett's life.
After the trauma of her father's murder, the Op takes Gabrielle to the Temple of the Holy Grail, a San Francisco cult. At first it seems like a slightly goofy but harmless little pseudo-religion -- until a hideous specter in the Op's room, and a murder that seems to have been committed by Gabrielle, shows that something sinister is lurking there. And finally, the "Dain curse" seemingly strikes again when Gabrielle's young husband is found dead...
Before anyone knew about Sam Spade, Hammett was churning out pulp fiction about the Continental Op in his trademark spare, sharp prose. "The Dain Curse" feels like three loosely connected short stories -- only Gabrielle Leggett ties them together, and the idea of the "Dain curse" (which is never fully dealt with -- though it makes an enticing title) which supposedly kills everyone around Gabrielle.
Hammett's writing is as dry and spare as always. However, the stories sometimes seem too short, especially the second one, which ends on a hurried note (we're only told of Gabrielle's marriage as a sort of postscript).
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