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The Dark Tower: Wizard and Glass v. 4 Paperback – 1997

4.4 out of 5 stars 543 customer reviews

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Paperback, 1997
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Harry Potter and the Cursed Child
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Product Details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Hodder & Stoughton (1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0340832266
  • ISBN-13: 978-0340832264
  • Product Dimensions: 11.3 x 17.9 x 5.6 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 440 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars 543 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,021,858 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
When I had first picked up the Gunslinger series, it was unlike anything I had ever read before. The descriptions of a post- apocalyptic future rang horribly true and real for me, and Roland had the dark appeal of a man with a noble cause doing questionable acts in the hopes that one day it would all be justified by the ends.
The more I read the more I became trapped in the world that King had created, and as a reader Roland's quest became my quest. What was the Dark Tower? What would happen in the final climax? Who would walk away in the after math to start the day anew?
Needless, to say King had me wrapped around his pinky in a manner of speaking.
However, the spell was not to last.
The fourth book came out, and with it came perhaps the one of the greatest insults to story and innovation I have ever witnessed a creator inflict on his own creations.
The DT series went from being a powerful tale that lampooned many of the stereotypes associated with the genre, to one that shamelessly espoused it.
The love interest has always been the bane of almost every form of entertainment be it film or literature. S/he is the anti-thesis of the hero and often makes one either gag or roll their eyes in exasperation at his or her blandness and/or sheer stupidity. Susan here is no different from every other typical damsel in distress we've been forced to swallow since childhood in fairytales. As another reviewer once stated there is nothing particularly beautiful or admirable about her, and we only know that she is pleasing to look at because King tells us so, however other than that she is merely a foil for Roland's own character rather than a real character herself.
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Format: Hardcover
After three books spanning countless years, one would hope Roland and his team would be somewhere near the vicinity of the tower during this book. Unfortunately, their not. Instead, while walking toward the tower, Roland flashes back to his teen years. If you're a fan of the series this might seem interesting to you, maybe even be exiting news. Don't get too excited however, as King takes Roland's teen years and turns them into a whacked out post apocalyptic New England version of Romeo and Juliet. The world of the young Roland doesn't even match the feel of the old books and his back story doesn't quite match what was revealed in the first book. Luckily, the story doesn't end with Roland's flashback. Instead, it carries on a bit more and we begin to see evidence that the ka-tet is actually nearer to the tower. Some old enemies return and there are characters from King's other books that are introduced making the DT series seem like a giant crossover for all Mr. King's books. To me this cheapens the series overall and disappoints me to no end. I hope the next book is better.
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Format: Audio CD
Although Stephen King's "Dark Tower" series is by far the most gripping and suspenseful set of books I have ever had the joy of reading, Wizard and Glass was, in my opinion, a poor addition to the series. Not only is King's grasp of human emotion desperately melodramatic, but the ungodly amount of cliche was practically unbearable.
I struggled to finish the story only for the small fraction of pages that dealt with the storyline of our small band of heroes. That was as excellent as the previous books. The flashback to Roland's past, however, was horrible, and I hated every word of it.
I would still recommend the series to anyone who loves any genre, even those who do not like King's work, as they are, as I aforementioned, outstanding. This book, however, is not up to par with the rest of them.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
I really enjoyed the first three Dark Tower books, so I figured I would read this one. After the first few pages, Stephen KIng goes back into Rolands past to write about Rolands first love. Gag me. It would have been ok if she was a tough female and had some substance, but she didn't! And why do we want to read a love story in the middle of a horror novel? I wanted to skip past that part, but somehow I finally got through it all and the only reason I did was because I thought that maybe it would get better. I guess it did, because she died so now we don't have to hear about her much more. However, the first three books in the series are quite good (I especially liked number 2) so do read those, and just skim this one. Hopefully book 5 will be better.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
This book slows the pace down a lot. King's 4th Dark Tower volume "Wizards and Glass" has Roland telling the story of when he and his former partners went to a town to investigate corruption and rebellion in Roland's father's kingdom. There he falls in love with a youg woman, and then, finaly toward the middle, things begin spirling out of control. The novel takes it cue from the movie "Shane", Shakspearian tragadies (like "Hamlet"), and more specificly "The Wizard of Oz", which gets very wierd. The romance was more of a distraction, and it was a big part of the novel. The link to "The Stand" becomes more solid in this one. This volume is good, but mostly only as a bridge to the next book.
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