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The Daughter of Time Paperback – Jun 25 2002

4.0 out of 5 stars 84 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Arrow; New edition edition (June 25 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0099430967
  • ISBN-13: 978-0099430964
  • Product Dimensions: 11 x 1.5 x 17.8 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 Kg
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars 84 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,488,057 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

Review

"Most people will find The Daughter Of Time as interesting and enjoyable a book as they will meet in a month of Sundays" Observer "A detective story with a very considerable difference. Ingenious, stimulating and very enjoyable" Sunday Times "Josephine Tey has always been absolutely reliable in producing original and mysterious plots with interesting characters and unguessable endings" Spectator --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

About the Author

Josephine Tey began writing full-time after the successful publication of her first novel, The Man in the Queue (1929), which introduced Inspector Grant of Scotland Yard. She died in 1952, leaving her entire estate to the National Trust.


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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Never having heard of Josephine Tey, I purchased this book and another, "Brat Farrar" on the strength of the description.
I have since read several other of the Tey collection, and I find them wonderful. Not a "mystery" in the usual sense, this is a novel which contains a so-called mystery. In other of her works, her Inspector Grant follows more conventional lines of investigating crimes. If you like one of Tey's books, I think
you will like them all. I highly recommend them.
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Format: Paperback
What happened to Richard III's nephews? Josephine Tey takes a look at the tales of Richard, his nephews, and what happened at the Tower of London. Starting with the Richard of Shakespeare and Thomas More, Tey, (through her bed-ridden detective Grant) dissects the stories of Richard III and finds a few problems with the Richard III most people are familiar with. Whether this revisionist view of Richard stands up to scrutiny is up to those with more background in this area than me, but I thoroughly enjoyed Tey's portrayal of the search for truth in the face of legend.
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Format: Library Binding
I first read this book 25 years ago and after re-reading it recently, I realize that the view of history as put forth by "Daughter of Time", is the view I have carried with me for the last 25 years. After reading the above reviews, I wanted to put my 2 cents in and say that this is the BEST of the Tey books. It is a mystery for history lovers and leaves an impression that other "light reading" does not. Josephine Tey is unfortunately gone from us, but this book remains a True Classic.
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Format: Paperback
I'm a Ricardian. I don't think Richard did his nephews in. Neither do I think that this book is a classic. It has a rather simple premise, and Tey seems completely set upon raising Richard III to a sort of divine pedestal. The guy had flaws. He was responsible for beheading people, and was a king. He is one of my favorite characters in history, and Tey tries, she does...but it falls flat. Carradine got on my nerves as well. Sorry.
If you want an admittedly romanticized (but far more interesting) book about Richard III, I would wholeheartedly suggest "The Sunne in Splendour". It is a finely crafted novel in which Sharon Kay Penman goes to show you that it is indeed very possible that Richard III was not the brute Will Shakespeare makes him out to be. Penman stays well within the historical boundaries (her reasearch is almost without boundaries).
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Format: Paperback
What thoughtful reader hasn't experienced Shakespeare's Richard III and wondered about the accuracy of the Bard's portrayal? Thus did Josephine Tey, near the close of her authorial career, delve into some of the lost nooks and crannies of English history in an effort to recover "the real Richard."
The well-known hurdle for all would-be Ricardians is, of course, the utter absence of source material contemporary to Richard's reign, and most of all anything that discusses the fate of the "princes in the Tower." All that is generally counted as "authoritative," it turns out, is the product of Tudor dynasty information factories. Tey, however, very likely had in her possession the writings of Sir Clements Markham, a late Victorian-era civil servant, whose careful revisionist argument is here unfolded in a lively, compelling narrative of incremental discovery.
Prompted by a reproduction of a famous portrait of Richard, Tey's laid-up sleuth, with the help of an American researcher, marshalls from his bed an archival assault on the estimable Sir Thomas More, Henry (the VII) Tudor, and the entire phalanx of worthies who have reported, for the last half a millennium, that Richard was the demonic crookback murderer of Shakespeare's characterization. Happily for us, there's more (sic) to the story than the traditional record, and those not already sucked into the revisionist Ricardian argument may very well be converted. Tey's engaging "fiction" is not only a great boon to all Ricardians--who, with Richard III Societies on both sides of the pond, must surely win hundreds if not thousands of new converts yearly as a result of this 50-year-old work--but the perfect place to begin your own exploration of this great historical proto-conspiracy.
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Format: Paperback
A pleasant little historical screed, Daughter of Time seems to be in love with revisionism for its own sake. To the detriment of its thesis, it presents all arguments against Richard III's villainy as good arguments, and all arguments for his villainy as bad arguments. While the factual arguments set out in the book, such as the unreliability of More's account of Richard III's reign and the lateness of the accusations against Richard, are persuasive, Tey also places great reliance upon her (and her characters, Grant and Carradine's) ability to judge a man's character and motives from his face and his actions after 400 years. This kind of "a person like X would never have done Y" argument counts for beans with me -- people are way too complex for such simple and subjective judgments.
When it is not writing in full-out polemic mode, Tey's dialogue is urbane and fun to read. If she had only had the sense to separate the good arguments for her thesis from the bad ones, she would have been convincing as well as entertaining.
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