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The Day the Crayons Quit Hardcover – Jun 27 2013

4.8 out of 5 stars 109 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 40 pages
  • Publisher: Philomel Books (June 27 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0399255370
  • ISBN-13: 978-0399255373
  • Product Dimensions: 26.2 x 1 x 26.2 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 431 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars 109 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #306 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

Review

Goodreads' 2013 Picture Book of the Year!

Amazon's Best Picture Book of the Year!

A Barnes & Noble Best Book of 2013!

Winner of the E.B. White Read-Aloud Award

* “Hilarious . . . Move over, Click, Clack, Moo; we’ve got a new contender for the most successful picture-book strike.” –BCCB, starred review 

“Jeffers . . . elevates crayon drawing to remarkable heights.” –Booklist

“Fresh and funny.” –The Wall Street Journal

"This book will have children asking to have it read again and again.” –Library Media Connection

* “This colorful title should make for an uproarious storytime.” –School Library Journal, starred review 

* “These memorable personalities will leave readers glancing apprehensively at their own crayon boxes.” –Publishers Weekly, starred review 

“Utterly original.” –San Francisco Chronicle

About the Author

Although Drew Daywalt grew up in a haunted house, he now lives in a Southern California home, haunted by only his wife, two kids, and five-month-old German Shepherd. His favorite crayon is Black.

Oliver Jeffers (www.oliverjeffersworld.com) makes art and tells stories. His books include How to Catch a Star; Lost and Found, which was the recipient of the prestigious Nestle Children’s Book Prize Gold Award in the U.K. and was later adapted into an award-winning animated film; The Way Back Home; The Incredible Book Eating Boy; The Great Paper Caper; The Heart and the Bottle, which was made into a highly acclaimed iPad application narrated by Helena Bonham Carter; Up and Down, the New York Times bestselling Stuck; The Hueys in the New Sweater, a New York Times Best Illustrated Book of the Year; and This Moose Belongs to Me, a New York Times bestseller. Originally from Belfast, Northern Ireland, Oliver now lives and works in Brooklyn, New York.
 


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Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I loved reading this book so much that I read it twice when I first got it, laughing out loud. Then when my husband came home, I read it to him. Such great humour and this is a book for anyone who remembers colouring with crayons. My son is four months so can't enjoy it to the extent that I did but I look forward sharing it with him again when he's older and can relate.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Love love love this book! Very fun and clever, and allows for a lot of creative thinking. I get requests to read this book ALL THE TIME. It's great when my kids love the book as much as I do. The younger kids have it memorized, and older ones love reading it in funny voices themselves. The art is great as well. If I could give more than 5 stars, I would!
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Format: Hardcover
My three-year-old daughter Magda loved this book so much that she can't wait to start school just so she can bring it with her to show her teacher. It's about a boy named Duncan who has an unexpected discovery one day at school. His crayons have all written him letters of complaint! Grey crayon is tired of colouring in all those large animals--elephants hippos, whales; Black crayon is tired of only being used to outline other colours; Blue crayon is just plain tired; Green crayon is happy enough but he'd like to intervene on behalf of his friends, Orange and Yellow, who are currently not speaking to each other as each claims to be the true colour of the sun; and Pink and Beige feel frankly ignored. How will Duncan appease them all?

Magda loved this book because she found it funny to think of her crayons as having opinions and complaints. Of course, I've heard her arguing with her Lambie on more than one occasion, so maybe she didn't find it so hard to believe after all.

I liked it because it's funny and clever, it encourages children to be creative with how they use their crayons (why not draw an orange whale or a yellow sky?) AND it's illustrated by the marvellous Oliver Jeffers (author/illustrator of The Incredible Book Eating Boy).

You can see more of Oliver Jeffers in his video, "Oliver Jeffers, Picture Book Maker" on my blog, Cozy Little Book Journal.

Source Disclaimer: I received a review copy directly from the publisher (thank-you!), but this did not influence the content of my review in any way. All opinions expressed are strictly my own (with a little help from my daughter of course).
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Format: Kindle Edition
This book is a winner for sure. It is absolutely one for your private collection, a must-have, a keeper. It is a debut book for the author, Drew Daywalt, and Oliver Jeffers is "THE illustrator" man to partner with. The book is narrated by individual disgruntled crayons who have their "day in court" and try to explain their grievances to their owner Duncan.

Duncan just wants to colour but when he opens up his crayon box he is confronted with letters of protest from each of its residents. Red is unhappy and overwhelmed because of overuse. Neurotic Purple is having a breakdown because he's a neat-freak and Duncan sometimes colours outside of the lines. He states,"If you don't start colouring inside the lines soon, I'm going to lose it." Grey is throwing in the towel because of misuse. He always gets the BIG jobs like colouring in the whales and elephants...come on give me a break. White is feeling neglected and non-existent and feels all empty inside because if she didn't have a black outline no one would know she was there. Black is beginning to hate just being the "outliner." Beige is tired of playing second fiddle to brown. Green seems happy and well adjusted but Orange and Yellow are not speaking to each other and are driving him crazy. Blue has a legitimate complaint as he is worn down to a stub with all of his contributions to Duncan's art. Pink is calling foul because she thinks she is being discriminated against because she is a girl. And don't get me started on Peach. Poor Peach is stripped naked, no underwear, and cannot even come out of the box because she is so unhappy.

Duncan reads all the letters and comes to a brilliant conclusion that each colour will be satisfied with. This book is playful, imaginative and unique. A perfect book for the back-to-school syndrome that is about to overtake your kids. I totally loved everything about it and highly recommend it.
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Format: Hardcover
I love the Day the Crayons Quit because the bright colours are great and the attitude they use on poor duncon. He just wanted to colour. The ending was so fun because he used all his crayons for everything they wanted to be.
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Format: Hardcover
This book is hillarious!! As an adult I really enjoyed the humour. Perfect for elementary school children. BUY THIS, you won't regret it!
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Format: Hardcover
My son adores this book. He has the crayons and what each colour would like/hate to draw memorized. He asks about Duncan, and how the crayons feel. I highly recommend it.
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Format: Hardcover
Duncan is a little boy who loves to colour. One day he opens his crayon box to find – not crayons, but – notes from his crayons! It seems they each have filed a complaint with him, quit, and left home. Of course, each wrote the note itself so the words are in the colour of the crayon. Here are a few:

Pink crayon feels that it’s more of a colour for girls so isn’t used much. How many things are pink?

Red crayon feels it’s used too much.

Blue crayon complains about being used so much it’s become too short to see over the edge of the box.

White writes that it usually can’t be seen unless outlined.

Peach is embarrassed. It seems Duncan peeled its paper off so now it feels naked.

Yellow and orange are fighting – something about the colour of the sun – so aren’t speaking to one another anymore.

Poor Duncan. What is he to do? You’ll have to read the book to find out what he comes up with to make them all happy. :)

This is a funny, well-written story young children should enjoy having read to them, and later learning to read themselves. This reader wanted to know what colour’s note would come next and what problem would be presented. The illustrations are cute and nicely done, with the crayons’ printing like a young child would do.

This book by Drew Daywalt was rated as Amazon Best Children’s Book of 2013.
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