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On Death and Dying Paperback – Jun 9 1997

4.4 out of 5 stars 25 customer reviews

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Harry Potter and the Cursed Child
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Scribner; 1 edition (June 9 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0684839385
  • ISBN-13: 978-0684839387
  • Product Dimensions: 14 x 2 x 21.4 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 281 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars 25 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #116,604 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

Review

"Life"A profound lesson for the living.

About the Author

Elisabeth Kübler-Ross, MD, [1926–2004] was a Swiss-born psychiatrist, humanitarian, and co-founder of the hospice movement around the world. She was also the author of the groundbreaking book On Death and Dying, which first discussed The Five Stages of Grief. Elisabeth authored twenty-four books in thirty-six languages and brought comfort to millions of people coping with their own deaths or the death of a loved one. Her greatest professional legacy includes teaching the practice of humane care for the dying and the importance of sharing unconditional love. Her work continues by the efforts of hundreds of organizations around the world, including The Elisabeth Kübler-Ross Foundation: EKRFoundation.org.

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4.4 out of 5 stars
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Format: Paperback
Elisabeth Kübler-Ross's book, 'On Death and Dying', is one of the classic works in the field, still used to educate and inform medical, counseling, and pastoral professionals since its original publication in the 1960s. Kübler-Ross did extensive research in the field by actually talking to those in the process of dying, something that had hitherto been considered taboo and an unthinkable, uncaring thing to do. Kübler-Ross asked for volunteers, and never pressured people to do or say anything they didn't want to. One of her unexpected discoveries was that the medical professionals were more reluctant to participate than were the patients, who quite often felt gratitude and relief at being able to be heard.
Kübler-Ross also spoke to families, and followed people through their ailments, sometimes to recovery, but most often to their death. She let the people guide her in her research: 'We do not always state explicitly [to the patient] that the patient is actually terminally ill. We attempt to elicit the patients' needs first, try to become aware of their strengths and weaknesses, and look for overt or hidden communications to determine how much a patient wants to face reality at a given moment.'
This caring approach was often an aggravation for Kübler-Ross and her staff, because they would know what the patient had been told but was not yet ready to face. Kübler-Ross recounts stories of attempts to deal with death in different ways; denial, anger, bargaining, depression, acceptance -- in fact, the various stages of grief were first recognised in Kübler-Ross's research.
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Format: Paperback
When I first started teaching an undergraduate course in Death & Dying in 1972, I could correctly assume that every student had already read Kubler-Ross. Now, they've never heard of her, which is a pity. Despite the total lack of evidence to support her five-stage paradigm, she did us all a favor by pulling the shroud off of the topic. She was the first popular writer to deal with feelings of the dying patient. Her book, which cost $1.95 back then, was hot stuff. She actually talked to terminally ill people and didn't beat around the bush. Now we've got any number of pop psychologists applying her five -stage theory to all sorts of things she never even thought of: grief, marriage problems, alcohol treatment, you name it. I tell my students that the staging theory has been around for 32 years now. If it is going to have any experimental support, perhaps it might have emerged by now. The fact is that people are much more complex than any five stages can account for, and people can hold more than one emotion at a time. I've heard Kubler-Ross herself say this many times. But, we can remember five ideas, so there you have it. If she'd proposed a 16-stage hierarchy, she would have never gotten big. At any rate, there are no real scientists in thanatology that now credit her much at all any more, but for historical purposes this is still a valuable book.
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Format: Paperback
Kubler-Ross's work is as valuable today as it was 30 years ago. She described the five stages of dying, while never maintaining that one had to go through the stages in perfect order or that one couldn't have other emotions along with, e.g, anger. No one would argue that death is loss--loss of one's self, or loss of someone dear to us. Many of us have other kinds of loss, i.e., a missing child--a child we have no hope of ever seeing. Is that not death of another kind? The tenets of Kubler-Ross continue to be popular because they have been empirically tested.
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Format: Paperback
I don't think any of us are prepared for death when it comes, be it accidental or even if it involves a long-term illness. Something about the finality and enormity of it makes it impossible to grasp. So "On Death and Dying" has to be the ultimate "handbook" if you will, on the subject. Most of us are familiar with the "stages" but there's more to this gem than just an explanation of that. The book really revolves around the terimally ill more so than those unexpected deaths that we so fear. Even so it's a worthwhile buy. I've been reading any and everything I can find on this subject, from books like Albom's "Tuesday's With Morrie" to the quirky and compelling looks at the different types of loss as pictured in Jackson McCrae's "The Children's Corner." "On Death" is a must for everyone. Afterall, it's something all of us will be experiencing.
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I am almost 18 now and my mom died at a car accident when i was 13 years old. I never knew how to cope with it and still dont really. This book is extremely well written but it didnt really help me. THe book is for terminal ill and for their relatives and friends, but it doesnt help a lot, when a loved one has died a sudden death. This book is great and it touched me but noone has ever told me that this book is not a great deal having to cope with a sudden death. In that case, better read "I wasnt ready to say good-bye" by Brook Noel, Pamela D. Blair. Because life goes on...
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