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Deep Red (Widescreen) [Import]

4.1 out of 5 stars 87 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Actors: David Hemmings, Daria Nicolodi, Gabriele Lavia, Macha Méril, Eros Pagni
  • Directors: Dario Argento
  • Writers: Dario Argento, Bernardino Zapponi
  • Producers: Claudio Argento, Salvatore Argento
  • Format: Dolby, Dubbed, Subtitled, Widescreen, NTSC, Import
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English
  • Dubbed: English
  • Region: All RegionsAll Regions
  • Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: UNRATED
  • Studio: Anchor Bay
  • Release Date: Sept. 9 2003
  • Run Time: 126 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars 87 customer reviews
  • ASIN: 6305807957
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Product Description

Amazon.ca

Considered by many to be Dario Argento's first masterpiece, Deep Red recalls his first hit, The Bird with the Crystal Plumage. British star David Hemmings (Blow-Up) plays an American jazz pianist who witnesses a brutal, bloody murder from afar and turns detective to find the killer. Kooky Italian journalist Daria Nicolodi (Argento's wife and cowriter on Suspiria) joins him as comic relief and tepid romantic interest, but the real costar is Argento's high style: gliding camera, razor-sharp editing, and gorgeous but gruesome set pieces. The story is convoluted, to say the least--plotting was never Argento's strong suit and the unnecessary exposition often drags the film down--but his vivid, horrific imagery is perfect for a thriller driven by haunting memories. Deep Red was originally released in the U.S. in a severely cut version retitled The Hatchet Murders (odd since the killer uses a butcher's knife). Producer Bill Lustig has restored the film to its original two-hour-plus running time, though some scenes exist only with Italian-language soundtracks (which are subtitled). It's a bit jarring at first (it makes for an unintended joke when a man suddenly checks his hearing aid after a language switch), but it's the only way to see Argento's original cut. There's also a brief 25th anniversary documentary with Argento and cowriter Bernardino Zapponi, and the DVD offers a choice of English and Italian language versions. --Sean Axmaker

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
After thirty years from its original appearance in 1975, Profondo Rosso (as Deep Red is titled in Italian) is still an exciting movie to watch. Unlike many of Argento's subsequent movies, Deep Red's plot is very well constructed, and the careful viewer (well...the VERY careful viewer) can pick up at least two crucial clues. The first, in the very first minutes of the movie, is central to the plot, but it is very easy to miss. It makes for a nice challenge to the first time viewer. Deep Red marks, in my opinion, the highest level of Argento's work. The atmosphere of the movie is greatly enhanced by the first collaboration of Argento with the musical group Goblin. A great soundtrack. I saw this movie first when I was a young student. Now,I saw it again to keep me company during my weekly long run on the treadmill. It made the run exciting, and time just flew!
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Format: DVD
A title that cannot miss in your Italian thriller collection! A movie that cannot be left unseen. A soundtrack that whips your spine cord. The ultimate masterpiece of Argento is a mixture of gore effects (last Italian work by Carlo "ET" Rambaldi), bedtime lullabies, screaming queens, supernatural atmosphere and memory games, supported by a perfect plot and a series of great Italian theatre actors whose only function in this film is to be killed in sequence, in a crescendo of ultraviolence.
The DVD edition of PROFONDO ROSSO is presented in widescreen 2.35:1 enhanced for 16x9 TVs, giving the audience all but the impression of a movie directed 27 years ago. The audio tracks are in Dolby Sorround 5.1, in Italian and in English, but portions of the English soundtrack were either never recorded or lost. These scenes are therefore presented in Italian with optional English subtitles. The extra features show the Italian and U.S. theatrical trailer and a featurette, 25th Anniversary, with an interview with director Dario Argento, writer Dardano Sacchetti and the Goblin, the group responsible for the nightmarish soundtrack which is part of the worldwide success of Argento's movie. Watch it alone, in the dark...
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By A Customer on March 8 2002
Format: DVD
I will make this short and sweet. For anyone interested in Italian giallo, then this is just required viewing and shame on those of you who waited this long to watch Deep Red. For the more experienced giallo audience, Deep Red, Profundo Rosso, Deep Red Hatchet Murders...whatever you want to call it, is strictly sub-par. Maybe worse. The film gives itself away RIGHT AWAY. Giallo Rule Number 1: Don't show the audience the killer fifteen minutes into the film (unless you are Mario Bava, then it is okay) See TWITCH OF THE DEATH NERVE. Giallo Rule Number 2: Make the motives of the killer interesting. Or at least entertaining. Dario falls short. Argento's Rule Number 1: Kill of Daria Nicoldi's character. Well, this is when Dario and Daria were sleeping together so I guess it doesn't count. The restored version included quasi-interesting plot points only to go nowhere with them. Half of it is Bernadino(?) Zapponi's fault for co-writting the script. This film was a commercial success in Italy because a)Dario Argento directed it after his failed 'Five Days In Milan' b) Fired the original film composer to replace him with the prog rock band Cherry Five who changed their name to Goblin and c) Goblin rule. This isn't the greatest film, as some people would have you believe. Watch Tenebrae (AWESOME MOVIE) or better yet, try to find Lucio Fulci's MURDER TO THE TUNE OF THE SEVEN BLACK NOTES...
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Format: DVD
People weren't lying when they said this was Argento's masterpiece. Everything from murder scences to the ones where people were just talking kept me in interest. Once again the music was incredible. All of Argento's music in his movies seem to be well done. The ending of this movie was fantastic! I enjoyed this film a lot more then Tenebrae because it was more interesting. This movie made more sense..and kept me in suspence more. I don't know why some people said that this movie is boring, because it is not.
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Format: DVD
I really couldn't tell you why I have yet to watch every film in Dario Argento's filmography, but by watching "Deep Red," I am finally starting to make some inroads into his body of work. It was easy to claim ignorance of many of this Italian director's important works a few years ago because it was difficult to find them anywhere, let alone in an uncut form. Fortunately, DVD arrived on the scene and eager film fans with dollars to spend inspired numerous companies to start churning out any movie they could get their hands. Even Troma, the flagship of flaccid filmmaking, released a so-so version of Argento's "The Stendhal Syndrome." It wasn't too long before practically every Argento film arrived on store shelves, many of them in uncut, unrated formats. Unfortunately, most viewers have most likely never heard of Dario Argento. These days, more people are familiar with the director's beautiful daughter Asia than with the horror maestro himself. What a shame. Argento's films, at least the ones I have seen, are masterpieces of style injected with truly cringe inducing violence. For a few years in the 1980s and 1990s, Argento drifted away from his tried and true giallo formula, only recently returning to some semblance of form with "Stendhal" and "Sleepless." "Deep Red" is Argento firmly entrenched in his giallo prime, a movie loaded with black-gloved killings, intricate plot twists and turns, and atmosphere so think you can cut it with a knife.
Starring David Hemmings (who recently passed away) and Dario's real life squeeze Daria Nicolodi, "Deep Red" continually reminded me of his first picture, "The Bird With the Crystal Plumage" because Argento presents with essentially the same set up.
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