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The Design of Everyday Things: Revised and Expanded Edition Paperback – Nov 5 2013

4.6 out of 5 stars 12 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Basic Books; Revised Edition edition (Nov. 5 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0465050654
  • ISBN-13: 978-0465050659
  • Product Dimensions: 2.5 x 16.5 x 21 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 363 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars 12 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #320 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Review

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“Even classics can be updated and improved… Highly recommended.”

“This book changed the field of design. As the pace of technological change accelerates, the principles in this book are increasingly important. The new examples and ideas about design and product development make it essential reading.”—Patrick Whitney, Dean, Institute of Design, and Steelcase/Robert C. Pew Professor of Design, Illinois Institute of Technology

“Twenty-five years ago The Design of Everyday Things was instrumental in orienting my approach to design. With this latest revised and expanded edition, Don Norman has given me a host of new ideas to explore as well as reminding me of the fundamental principles of great and meaningful design. Part operating manual for designers and part manifesto on the power of designing for people, The Design of Everyday Things is even more relevant today than it was when first published.”—Tim Brown, CEO, IDEO, and author of Change by Design

“Norman enlightened me when I was a student of psychology decades ago and he continues to inspire me as a professor of design. His new book underpins all essential aspects of interaction design, the mother of human creation. It equips designers to make the world a safer, more pleasant and more exciting place. The cumulated insights and wisdom of the cross-disciplinary genius Donald Norman are a must for designers and a joy for those who are interested in artifacts and people.”—Cees de Bont, Dean, School of Design, and Chair Professor of Industrial Design, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University

About the Author

Don Norman is co-founder of the Nielsen Norman Group, an executive consulting firm that helps companies produce human-centered products and services. He is Breed Professor of Design Emeritus at Northwestern University and Professor Emeritus at the University of California, San Diego, where he was founding chair of the Department of Cognitive Science and chair of the Department of Psychology. He has served as Vice President of Apple Computer's Advanced Technology Group, and his many books include 'Emotional Design', 'The Design of Future Things', and most recently, 'Living with Complexity'.


Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Don Norman puts into words what i have struggled to communicate to so many organizations. His understanding of design principles os thorough and plainly explained. This will be a staple reference on my shelf. Every project manager operations manager and engineer should be fully aware of these principles and put them into practice.
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By Jeffrey Swystun TOP 50 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on Aug. 18 2015
Format: Kindle Edition
Author Norman popularized the term user-centered design and a proponent of design thinking. I believe these approaches to design make it seem like the product has been designed with you in mind. He uses short illustrative case studies to describe the psychology of good and bad design. The rich theory is brought alive through the examination of light switches, door knobs and other day-to-day items we have common and frequent interaction. Here are some bon mots from the book:

“Design is really an act of communication, which means having a deep understanding of the person with whom the designer is communicating.”

“The design of everyday things is in great danger of becoming the design of superfluous, overloaded, unnecessary things.”

“Good design is actually a lot harder to notice than poor design, in part because good designs fit our needs so well that the design is invisible.”

This is the most recent edition of a 25 year old book that remains relevant and entertaining. The 2013 edition has been updated (NEST is given its due) and includes two entirely new chapters. I like that Norman does not believe in human error as much as bad design (especially when I push on a door that should be pulled). All of this has been made more impressive given at time of this review the book is #1 in Industrial & Product Design, #1 in Retailing, and #4 in Applied Psychology.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Thoroughly enjoying The Design of Everything Things - I've picked it up in between other readings, and seem to find little lightbulb moments with the everyday objects I encounter after reading a passage or two. Don Norman provides an interesting perspective and history to how all these little things we encounter add up. Great design read!
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I read this book twice. Norman does a great job of pointing out great and poor design, and you'll never look at a door knob in the same way for the rest of your life. All designers should have this book open on their desks at all times.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Interesting as an engineer to see the alarming disconnect between the best design intentions and the experience of actual users !
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Easy to read, packed full of useful tidbits; lots of take-aways and an overall better understanding of how to improve design.
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