Buy Used
CDN$ 4.04
+ CDN$ 6.49 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: This book is in very good condition and will be shipped within 24 hours of ordering. The cover may have some limited signs of wear but the pages are clean, intact and the spine remains undamaged. This book has clearly been well maintained and looked after thus far. Money back guarantee if you are not satisfied. See more of our deals.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Designers' Stationery Hardcover – Feb 15 2002

4.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
CDN$ 13.40 CDN$ 4.04

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child
click to open popover

No Kindle device required. Download one of the Free Kindle apps to start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, and computer.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product Details

  • Hardcover: 144 pages
  • Publisher: HBI (Feb. 15 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0066213908
  • ISBN-13: 978-0066213903
  • Product Dimensions: 24.2 x 22.4 x 2.3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 875 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,853,789 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  •  Would you like to update product info, give feedback on images, or tell us about a lower price?

Product Description

About the Author

Roger Walton is currently Art Director of Duncan Baird Publishers and has lectured on Design at several major art colleges in the U.K. He is General Editor of eight other graphic design titles, including Typographics 1, 2, 3 and 4.

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See the customer review
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
As a designer that purchases more design books than what he needs (or has time to read), it is suffice to say that I have purchased many books on letterheads, business cards, etc. In these books, you see how design companies created letterheads and business cards for their clients.
And there are good books out there but have you ever wondered what the letterheads and business cards for design agencies/firms look like?
What "Designers' Stationery: How designers and design companies present themselves to the world" does is just that.
When I first saw this book, I just had to purchase it because there is nothing like it out in the market. Every book is again about the designer's clients and this book shows you the innovative letterheads, envelopes and business cards created by these companies.
I would have given this a five star rating but one thing that I didn't see that is important to me when buying books on stationary is the paper stock these design companies used to print their stationery on. Sure, it's nice to see special features listed but for most books on stationery, it's useful and nice to know the paperstock used.
If you don't mind spending [money] to checking out how international design companies putting some flare into their stationery, check this book out. You really see some innovative ways they are able to attract attention. It might even make you want to redo your own stationery. Check it out!
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0xa6a12300) out of 5 stars 2 reviews
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa6a14e88) out of 5 stars A different perspective to books on stationery. Aug. 12 2002
By [KNDY] Dennis A. Amith - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
As a designer that purchases more design books than what he needs (or has time to read), it is suffice to say that I have purchased many books on letterheads, business cards, etc. In these books, you see how design companies created letterheads and business cards for their clients.
And there are good books out there but have you ever wondered what the letterheads and business cards for design agencies/firms look like?
What "Designers' Stationery: How designers and design companies present themselves to the world" does is just that.
When I first saw this book, I just had to purchase it because there is nothing like it out in the market. Every book is again about the designer's clients and this book shows you the innovative letterheads, envelopes and business cards created by these companies.
I would have given this a five star rating but one thing that I didn't see that is important to me when buying books on stationary is the paper stock these design companies used to print their stationery on. Sure, it's nice to see special features listed but for most books on stationery, it's useful and nice to know the paperstock used.
If you don't mind spending [money] to checking out how international design companies putting some flare into their stationery, check this book out. You really see some innovative ways they are able to attract attention. It might even make you want to redo your own stationery. Check it out!
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa6a16030) out of 5 stars Good idea, poorly executed Aug. 22 2006
By DianaKC - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This book should have been a useful and interesting resource, but its function is seriously undermined by the hideous visual design. Instead of presenting the designers' stationery on a neutral background so that it can be clearly seen and appreciated, the book's designer(s) fill the space around and behind the examples with bright colors and shapes, blown up logos, and other distracting clutter. No shadows, borders, or other delineating marks are used to distinguish the stationery from the background, making it difficult at times to even pick out what parts of the page are examples and what are just background "flourishes."

I recommend that instead of this book, people interested in designers' stationery and other self-promotional work look to design magazines like Step, Print, and Communication Arts for their annual reviews of the best in this and other design areas.


Feedback