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Developing Quality Technical Information: A Handbook for Writers and Editors (3rd Edition) Paperback – Jun 25 2014

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 624 pages
  • Publisher: IBM Press; 3 edition (June 25 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0133118975
  • ISBN-13: 978-0133118971
  • Product Dimensions: 17.5 x 2 x 22.6 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 839 g
  • Average Customer Review: 2.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #16,828 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

About the Author

The authors are all long-standing and respected members of the information development community at IBM. Although the authors have served in various roles throughout their careers, information quality has always been and continues to be their primary focus.

 

Michelle Carey is an information architect and technical editor at IBM and has taught technical communication at University of California Santa Cruz Extension. Michelle is the co-author of the book DITA Best Practices: A Roadmap for Writing, Editing, and Architecting in DITA. She is an expert on topic-based information systems, software product error messages, grammar, embedded assistance for user interfaces, and writing for international audiences. She also writes computational linguistic rules for a grammar, style, and terminology management tool. Michelle enjoys teaching, grammar, herding cats, and riding and driving anything with a lot of horsepower.

 

Moira McFadden Lanyi is an information architect and technical editor at IBM. She has experience with topic-based writing, DITA, embedded assistance, user interface design, and visual design. She created 99% of the artwork in this book. She is a co-author of the book An Introduction to IMS. Moira enjoys visiting San Francisco with her family as often as possible, cooking fresh, healthy meals, and watching her courageous son ride his unicycle and surf.

 

Deirdre Longo is an information architect and strategist at IBM. She has been a pioneer for embedded assistance in IBM: defining the scope of that term, developing standards for embedded assistance, and modeling how to work effectively in cross-disciplinary teams. She has taught webinars for the Society of Technical Communication (STC) and published articles on information architecture topics in STC’s Intercom. She is an avid yoga practitioner.

 

Eric Radzinski is a technical editor and information architect for industry-leading mainframe database software at IBM. He is a co-author of The IBM Style Guide: Conventions for Writers and Editors and is well versed in topic-based writing, embedded assistance, DITA, and writing for a global audience. Eric makes his home in San Jose, California, with his wife and their three children.

 

Shannon Rouiller is an information architect and technical editor at IBM. She has experience with quality metrics, topic-based information systems, DITA, videos, embedded assistance, and user interface design. She is a co-author of the book Designing Effective Wizards. Shannon dabbles in sports photography and likes to solve puzzles.

 

Elizabeth Wilde is an information quality strategist at IBM, developing strategies and education for developing high-quality content. She develops Acrolinx computational linguistic rules that enforce grammar, style, and DITA tagging rules. She teaches an extension course in technical writing at the University of California Santa Cruz. Her hobbies include growing cacti and succulents and collecting tattoos.

 

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0xb30f39c0) out of 5 stars 6 reviews
12 of 15 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xb3110558) out of 5 stars A Must Have for any Technical Writer Aug. 8 2014
By T Anderson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
As an enterprise and software architect the one thing I hate most about my job is documentation, yet the importance of doing documentation on sizable projects is what I find myself preaching about the most.

One reason I understand the importance of documentation is that I came from an electronic engineering background. As an electronic engineer 93% - 97% of my time was consumed doing proof of concepts and documentation. Almost all of that time was documentation.

It was just my luck that my boss was an English grammar teacher before moving into engineering. My documents came back very bloody. He used a red pen to mark up my documents. It took me 2 years, and a whole lot of tongue biting, but I started getting papers through him without a red mark. I still remember the first one. I walked outside to where the smokers took their breaks and let out a screaming "YES, Finally!!!"

I have been without my grammar teaching boss for over 18 years now, and I am pretty sure if he came across the book reviews I am writing now, he would be sending me bloodied up copies!!! I really needed this book!!

Technical documentation is a hard skill set to learn, at least doing good technical documentation is. I have been on Template Zombie projects where teams considered documentation complete when they had filled in enough templates to overwhelm the customer to the point where they would not have time to review 1/10 of what was being written.

One project I was on built a documentation generator so it was easier to duplicate documents and only change the title and a few pieces of content. The sad part of that project was they got paid for each document handed in. The criteria for getting paid for use cases were that they had to have something underneath every heading in the document.

Documentation should not be something you check off of the project's task list, it should add value to the project or it should not be done. This book will definitely help you make valuable documentation. I have listed the chapters below to give you an idea of what the book covers.

Part 1: Introduction
Chapter 1. Technical information continues to evolve
Chapter 2. Developing quality technical information

Part 2: Easy to use
Chapter 3. Task orientation
Chapter 4. Accuracy
Chapter 5. Completeness

Part 3: Easy to understand
Chapter 6. Clarity
Chapter 7. Concreteness
Chapter 8. Style

Part 4: Easy to find
Chapter 9. Organization
Chapter 10. Retrievability
Chapter 11. Visual effectiveness

Part 5: Putting it all together
Chapter 12. Applying more than one quality characteristic
Chapter 13. Reviewing, testing, and evaluating technical information

Part 6: Appendixes
Appendix A. Quality checklist
Appendix B. Who checks which characteristics?
Glossary
Resources and references

When I came into the Dot Com Boom I found some software engineering, but most of what I found was the wild west and cowboy coding running rampant. The industry has not changed much since then. We just gave names to the chaotic processes to justify our lack of discipline. I continued my engineering practices and quickly learned how to document software processes and architectures, but convincing others to do it was a different story.

The only way I have been able to show it has value is do it myself. After the team sees I am willing to suffer the boredom of documentation they tend to step in and help. That wouldn't happen if we didn't make use of the documentation and they didn't see value in it.

It has been years since I have had someone to officially review it. This book really helps keep the important things in mind, and since there is no one else to review it, I can use all the help I can get. Right now one of the things I do to catch issues in my documents is have them spoken back to me using the speech capabilities on my computers. This helps me catch sentence structure issues, and some typos. It doesn't catch using the wrong their/there, insure/ensure, except/accept, and many more like sounding words that I mess up.

I use Sparx Enterprise Architect to document systems. Behind every diagram you find the information that explains them. If that information is not simple to understand, and easy to read, the diagram's value falls greatly.

Throughout the process you need to write for several different audiences. Your stakeholders are interested in different aspects of the system. Creating a clear view of what each type of stakeholder wants to see is a painful process, but it always pays off.

It makes me think about the solution from angles I normally wouldn't. Not only think about them, but diagram and describe them in a way that the solution's diagrams and associated documents can stand on their own. It makes me justify and clarify all the decisions made about the system, before it is in production!

Doing documentation is like coding. You start with a shell of what you are building, and you add the details to the different topics with each iteration of your development cycle. Your goal- to make simple, complete, accurate, logical, easy to understand documents. That is exactly what this book will guide you to do.

There are tons of examples showing the original text, diagram, or screen shot of a design, and then the revised version. There are two really cool appendices and a nice glossary. The first appendix is a huge checklist for quality characteristic. The second appendix is a big chart showing which roles should be reviewing the different aspects of the document.

Over all I found every chapter of this book valuable. As time goes on, the hardest part for me is keeping it all in mind. For that reason, this book will be staying by my side just like each of my current most useful programming books. If you do any documenting of software systems, this is a must read. Every software architect, enterprise architect, CIO, developer, tester, and project manager working on a software project, should have this book in his or her hands. You own to your stakeholders and yourself.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xb31105ac) out of 5 stars So valuable, I have paperbacks and the Kindle edition July 19 2015
By Jay P. - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I am a technical writer and editor with eight years of experience, and I regret that I did not read this book when I first started my career. When people ask me about getting started in technical documentation, I recommend this book to them. The main sections of the book provide guidelines on writing documentation that is easy to use, easy to understand, and easy to find. The book definitely follows these concepts, which helps when I reference it for developing content, editing content, or determining the best style guidelines for the documentation teams that I work with.

This book has been so invaluable that I have a paperback at home, a paperback in the office, and a Kindle edition that I can reference from my mobile devices. It is full of so much useful information, I reread sections periodically to refresh myself on the guidelines in that section. Whether you are new or experienced in technical documentation, I highly recommend this book to you.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xb3110888) out of 5 stars Best tech writing and reviewer responsibilities reference book for everyone, not just tech writers and editors Nov. 27 2015
By Yvonne Kucher - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I've been a technical editor for many decades and I always tell anyone who asks that this is the best reference for anyone who writes or reviews technical content because it is.

I've used this book for my editing since version 2 and I'm a believer that if you use this book, your tech writing will improve and your understanding of the roles of the different reviewers will be much clearer.

Buy it, read it, use it! Just do it!
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xb3110da4) out of 5 stars so I can't say it's the best, but I can highly recommend it March 16 2016
By Joseph Laba - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I am a neophyte technical writer, but experienced in grammar and composition. Having only read the first few chapters, I have already learned several theoretical and practical points that I have been able to apply. This is my first book on the subject, so I can't say it's the best, but I can highly recommend it. I would buy this book again.
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xb311066c) out of 5 stars Five Stars July 1 2015
By E. Moffitt - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Fantastic information for writing help manuals and similar technical documents.


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