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Duke Original recording remastered

4.2 out of 5 stars 22 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (Feb. 21 1995)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Original recording remastered
  • Label: Atco
  • ASIN: B000002J2F
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  LP Record
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars 22 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #12,637 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)
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1. Behind The Lines
2. Duchess
3. Guide Vocal
4. Man Of Our Times
5. Misunderstanding
6. Heathaze
7. Turn It On Again
8. Alone Tonight
9. Cul-De-Sac
10. Please Don't Ask
11. Duke's Travels
12. Duke's End

Product Description

Product Description

Digitally remastered reissue of the 1980 album by the esteemed Prog/Rock band featuring a new stereo mix of the album. This reissue features the new mix of the album's original tracks (sans bonus tracks) yet adds a new breath of fresh air on these classic recordings. 12 tracks including 'Misunderstanding', Turn It On Again' and 'Duchess'. EMI. 2008.

Amazon.ca

Duke saw Genesis start, somewhat unwillingly, to shed their progressive-rock mantle. Partly this was a response to the radically changing musical scene, partly a result of Phil Collins's new-found influence within the band as a songwriter, and partly it was a logical direction if they were to capitalize upon the success of "Follow You Follow Me" from 1978's And Then There Were Three. Recorded at Abba's Polar Studios in Stockholm, Duke showcased a more commercial sound, brisker arrangements, and more down-to-earth (some would say merely more prosaic) lyrics. Though Tony Banks was still responsible for the majority of the songwriting, turning in the classic "Duchess" and "Heathaze," the album also contains Collins's first two solo compositions, including "Misunderstanding," a template for the songs of his forthcoming solo career. In contrast to the relatively muddy-sounding And Then There Were Three, Duke is clear and sharp, with Collins's increasingly arena-friendly drum sound showcased in the mix. --James Swift


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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
there are some great tunes on this but overall not their best - not certain how much they worked at this but to me this was really trying to work their more commercial side - it work on some tunes - but failed on others
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Format: Audio CD
I really don't think this website should be used as a discussion forum, but I feel that "trickoftail"'s last "review" was more or less a response to my post, so I'm going to reply here just this once.
Smallcreep's Day is a nice album, but there really isn't anything "progressive" about it (not that that necessarily matters.) A Curious Feeling I agree is excellent, and possibly the best Genesis solo album overall. Not sure if it's "progressive" or not, but it's still wonderful.
My bottom line is that some Genesis fans have too narrow of a definition of "progressive". They seem to think it's all about the long compositions and grandiose arrangements and keyboard and guitar solos, etc. etc...but progressive music is really more about *attitude*, and the willingness to creatively incorporate various styles and ideas into rock music. At this point in their career (1980), Genesis was still doing that. To say that Genesis "sold out" at this point in their career is simply wrong. "Selling out" means to compromise your standards and principles solely for the purpose of making money. Genesis had always been writing pop songs and trying to get songs on the radio ever since their heyday - so if songs like Misunderstanding, Turn It On Again, Please Don't Ask etc. are examples of selling out, then you might as well say songs like Happy The Man, I Know What I Like, Counting Out Time, Carpet Crawlers etc. are sellouts too. Even if they are somewhat accessible, they certainly aren't formatted for Top 40 radio.
Another reason this album isn't a sellout is because it dares to take risks and move Genesis' music into a different direction, while still retaining some of their classic qualities (something which Yes and ELP failed to do nearly as well.
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Format: Audio CD
I felt compelled to give a brief review of Duke because of the inexplicably negative ones here, so that those new to Genesis or who haven't listened to Duke would know the truth. I first bought this record at the age of 13 a few years after its release, and it has always stood as one of my favorites of the Genesis catalog, as well as among my record collection as a whole. I return to it time and again. As others have pointed out, stylistically it's a transitional album for the group, between their art-rock period and their more pop-oriented era. As such, it has elements of both eras and this is one of its great attributes. This is simply a phenomenal listening experience. It's ear candy from start to finish, with doses of the layered, complex arrangements we love from this band, like "Duke's Travels/Duke's End," to pop tunes like "Turn It on Again" that never get old. It is wholly accessible both to those who might dig Phil Collins' solo stuff and those who are looking for more intelligent and stylish art rock. No it ain't "Lamb Lies Down..." or "Selling England...," but all bands evolve and like those records, "Duke" has its own prominent place in the creative world of Genesis.
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Format: Audio CD
Anyone who says "Post-Hackett Genesis sounds just like Phil Collins solo" or "Genesis turned into a pop band when Steve left" has obviously never listened to an album like Duke. (They probably never listened to much early Genesis either, aside from the songs that were 7 minutes or longer.) Genesis' music has always been a hybrid of pop and progressive styles, and Duke carries that tradition into the 1980s.
That isn't to say they hadn't changed at all. Duke has an overall happier and more straightforward feel than previous efforts, and the lyrics deal with real-life issues (especially Collins' marital problems) rather than the surreal fantasies of their past. Also, the Motown/R&B influence that Genesis hinted at on previous albums is much more prominent here, particularly on Behind The Lines, Misunderstanding, Turn It On Again, and the heartbreaking Please Don't Ask (gotta love the bass licks on that song), and the whole failed-romance theme that runs throughout the album suits this kind of music very well. The closing instrumentals, Duke's Travels and Duke's End, carry on in the tradition of songs like Los Endos and In That Quiet Earth.
A few songs do fall short of previous standards -- Mike's "Alone Tonight" is rather generic and whiny, and Tony's "Cul-De-Sac" is unnecessarily bombastic in places. Also, it's a shame that two excellent songs, "Evidence of Autumn" and "Open Door", were left off the album...perhaps they could have been used to replace the two mentioned above.
Still, this album has plenty of good compositions, great arrangements, and passionate performances -- Phil's vocals in particular have never sounded better.
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Format: Audio CD
So it's 1980, prog rock is not cool anymore, and everybody is trying to score a disco hit, or become a spiked-hair neo punk band, or do some of that Jamaican stuff (reggae, is it called?). You are Genesis, your star singer is long gone, and your not-so-star guitarist is gone too. What do you do?
A great album it seems.
I couldn't care less whether this album has "commercial" music in it. I do know it is good music -and that suffices for me. Whether it was recorded in ABBA's Swedish studios or not, well, duh. These three guys had talent, and once they realized they didn't need to play twenty minutes of ever-changing riffs to be good (yeah, this is for Tony Banks), they moved to a different -better- dimension.
This album is sooooo much better than any of the old 70's Genesis previous works. Gone is the need to impress, welcome are the steady rhythms, the bass pulse, and Phil Collins' natural sense to score big hits. Hold on a second, how come prog rock stars are allowed to make big bucks too? (and still many old dinosaurs think that way...)
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