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Eat Pray Love 10th-Anniversary Edition: One Woman's Search for Everything Across Italy, India and Indonesia Paperback – Jan 30 2007

3.6 out of 5 stars 119 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Riverhead Books; 1 edition (Jan. 30 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0143038419
  • ISBN-13: 978-0143038412
  • Product Dimensions: 13.7 x 2.5 x 21.3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 299 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars 119 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #851 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

From Amazon

If wisdom could be traded like currency, author Elizabeth Gilbert would be a wealthier woman by far, though it's likely her fabulous memoir, Eat Pray Love, racked up a few bucks during its stay on the New York Times bestseller list. What Gilbert imparts in her story--basically, bracing self-knowledge acquired during a year of travel following a bitter divorce and a shattered rebound romance--is at once astounding yet totally obvious. As Gilbert would attest, albeit more eloquently, the most important stuff in life is pretty much under our noses, but we occasionally have to shake ourselves senseless in order to see it (enlisting a guru and a medicine man are highly recommended).

Take this simple but devastating observation posited while Gilbert was on the final leg of a global tour. "I have a history of making decisions very quickly about men. I have always fallen in love fast and without measuring risks. I have a tendency not only to see the best in everyone, but to assume that everyone is emotionally capable of reaching his highest potential. I have fallen in love more times than I care to count with the highest potential of a man, rather than with the man himself, and then I have hung on to the relationship for a long time (sometimes far too long) waiting for the man to ascend to his own greatness. Many times in romance I have been the victim of my own optimism."

Ten million women are smiling wry smiles and nodding their heads in agreement (men too, probably, but the book has a definite female skew). Such emotional bulls-eyes are hit early and often in Eat Pray Love, each seemingly more poignant than the last. Alternately funny and heartbreaking and always deeply resonant, Eat Pray Love, takes the reader on two epic journeys – one through Italy, India and Indonesia and the other deep inside Gilbert's intense psyche. Charles Montgomery's towering The Last Heathen: Encounters with Ghosts and Ancestors in Melanesia notwithstanding, travel memoirs just don't get any better than that. --Kim Hughes

From Publishers Weekly

Starred Review. Gilbert (The Last American Man) grafts the structure of romantic fiction upon the inquiries of reporting in this sprawling yet methodical travelogue of soul-searching and self-discovery. Plagued with despair after a nasty divorce, the author, in her early 30s, divides a year equally among three dissimilar countries, exploring her competing urges for earthly delights and divine transcendence. First, pleasure: savoring Italy's buffet of delights--the world's best pizza, free-flowing wine and dashing conversation partners--Gilbert consumes la dolce vita as spiritual succor. "I came to Italy pinched and thin," she writes, but soon fills out in waist and soul. Then, prayer and ascetic rigor: seeking communion with the divine at a sacred ashram in India, Gilbert emulates the ways of yogis in grueling hours of meditation, struggling to still her churning mind. Finally, a balancing act in Bali, where Gilbert tries for equipoise "betwixt and between" realms, studies with a merry medicine man and plunges into a charged love affair. Sustaining a chatty, conspiratorial tone, Gilbert fully engages readers in the year's cultural and emotional tapestry--conveying rapture with infectious brio, recalling anguish with touching candor--as she details her exotic tableau with history, anecdote and impression.
Copyright Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I know millions of women got a lot out of this book, but I just couldn't find anything enlightening in it. The author was also paid in advance to have the spiritual experience she writes about, which made me doubt its sincerity. I did enjoy the food descriptions in the 'eat' part, though.

The best book of this genre is "Gift From the Sea" by Ann Morrow Lindbergh.
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Format: Paperback
Gilbert's adventures combine a challenging spiritual quest with dreamlike travel experiences. Her struggles with inner pain are real and gripping, while the exotic locales stoke the reader's appetite for more. She seems to mix it all very well -- inner growth, vocational renewal, and the best kinds of friendship. I just loved her Balinese friend Wayan.

Some people would consider this book spiritual tourism at its most escapist. But let me give one paragraph as an example of what Gilbert puts herself through:

"It took me a while to drop into real silence. Even after I'd stopped talking, I found I was still humming with language. My organs and muscles of speech -- brain, throat, chest, back of neck -- vibrated with the residual effects of talking long after I'd stopped making sounds. My head shimmered in a reverb of sound, the way an indoor swimming pool seems to echo interminably with sounds and shouts, even after the kindergarteners have gone home for the day. It took a surprizingly long time for all this pulsation of speech to fall away, for the whirling noises to settle. Maybe it took about three days."

I'm really glad to see this book topping the bestseller lists in North America, and I hope Gilbert's kind of adventure becomes the popular aspiration of the future.

--author of A Galaxy of Immortal Women: The Yin Side of Chinese Civilization
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Format: Paperback
This is the story of a self-absorbed woman getting over a failed relationship. She escapes to Italy, India and Bali in search of discovering some meaning to her life. Unfortunately, her experiences are not only entirely glib and mundane, they are written in such a cute and syrupy style that I finished reading the book only through sheer perseverance. I could go on about how this book can be seen as a reflection of modern individualistic society, but I digress.

I found this book utterly nauseating. A complete waste of time.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The first time I saw Eat, Pray, Love I didn't really understand the cover or what it was about. I was a young new mother and had no inclination or time to read anything too heavy or too involved because days might pass before I could pick up a book again. Still, I purchased the book after a girlfriends glowing review. I began reading, tired, overworked and in the throws of mommy hood I quickly became bored, irritated, skipped ahead and like many of the poor reviews left here - I just gave up and passed the book on to someone else. I had similar sentiments in that I was just a regular joe blow who would never have the time or the money to take a year and find myself. Find yourself? Who has time for that, and like other reviewers I judged Liz for being able to do such a thing. Everyone I spoke to that mentioned the book I would say, "I just couldn't get into it." To say I was jealous of Liz was an understatement. However, my jealousy was masked with judgement.

When the movie came out I was quick to line up and be there on opening night. Why I wasn't sure, but I was curious if the movie would translate better for me. My sister and I attended the movie and I completely lost my sh#t in the movie theatre, crying and relating to that dark and most honest moment where Liz asks God for a sign and he tells her, "Go back to bed Liz." The movie turned my opinion around, I felt more like I could relate to Liz and being that a couple years had passed since I'd attempted the book my life had changed as well. Don't we all want a little more from life? Why should we settle? And why do we as women jump to judgement and shaming when another woman so brilliantly takes control of her life and sets out to find happiness within her instead of relying on someone else.
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Format: Paperback
Didn't like it at all. A journey into navel-gazing with a self-absorbed, whining author.
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Format: Paperback
It took me a while to actually get into this book, then I found her Italian experience interesting, probably because I'm Italian, but once she landed in India, I had a hard time reading all that crap!! and it just went on and on and on...
Need I say more, I did not finish the book.
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Format: Paperback
I'm going to play devil's advocate for this bestseller. After some very high recommendations from my friends, I purchased a copy of Eat Pray Love and brought it with me on my winter cruise. After numerous frustrating attempts to get through the first chapter I just could not finish this book. I found Ms. Gilbert's attitude and her prose to be artificial and self serving. How many of us can just pack-up and uproot ourselves, running away from our commitments? I understand the appeal of the book. It represents the imagined journey of discovery, the one without intrusive airport security, lonely moments in hotels and bad restaurant tables. All while being lead around by tour guides like so many sheep. Soon, I took my copy of Eat Pray Love and tucked it back into my luggage.
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